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  • Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    Rethink Dementia Conference Get Help Close We re Here to Help Nous sommes ici pour vous aider Support Soutien Education Éducation Resources Ressources Get Involved Close Donate Fundraise Volunteer Raise Your Voice Join Local Initiatives Share Your Thoughts Dementia Friends News Events About Us Close Mission Vision Values Our History Key Dates Annual Report Staff Directory Partners Board of Directors Career Opportunities Contact Us Learn more about Alzheimer s disease and other dementias Discover the people programs and services available to help people living with Alzheimer s disease and their families Be a part of the solution by getting involved with the chapter our events and fundraising Latest News Collins Barrow Giving Back for Over 20 Years Written by Susan Paul Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County Tracey Pagé was at a meeting at Collins Barrow more Headlines Collins Barrow Giving Back for Over 20 Years The Walk for Alzheimer s a Tangible Way to Help Caregiver Fact sheet Maintaining Relationships Understanding how dementia affects relationships and what will help Walk for Alzheimer s Story I can do it was her motto and most of the time she could Focus on Frontotemporal Dementia Donate Now Register Now Newsletter Sign

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/ (2016-04-26)
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  • About Dementia | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    précoce Les Démences On Y Repense About Dementia What is Dementia 10 Warning Signs Stages of the Disease Benefits of Early Diagnosis ReThink Dementia Questions Statistics Research Recent Presentations Our Contribution to Research Alzheimer Society Research Program Local Trials Studies Invite a Speaker La maladie En quoi consistent l Alzheimer et maladies apparentées 10 signes précurseurs Les stades de la maladie d Alzheimer Avantages du diagnostic précoce Les Démences On Y Repense Living With Dementia I Have Dementia Planning for the Future Legal and Financial Health and Personal Care Driving and Dementia Caring for Yourself Caring for Someone with Dementia Care Planning Checklist Understanding Behaviour Take Care of Yourself Long Distance Caregiving Safety in the Home Long Term Care Community Dementia Services Rethink Dementia Conference Quotidien J ai la maladie Planifier l avenir S occuper de quelqu un Get Help We re Here to Help Support Soutien Ottawa Minds in Motion Minds In Song Drop in and Connect Support Groups Individuals in Early Stages of Dementia Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Renfrew County Drop In and Connect Support Groups Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Soutien en français Café rencontre Groupes de soutien Groupe de soutien pour les familles francophones Soutien individuel Education Éducation Other Opportunities Learn Online Webinars Interactive Learning Transition to Long Term Care Staff Families Working Together Dementia 101 Dementia 102 Communication Dementia 103 Behaviour Ottawa Free Education for Families Learning Series for Caregivers Other Opportunities Renfrew County Free Education for Families Learning Series for Caregivers Ressources éducatives en français Séries d apprentissage Webinaires Apprentissage interactif La transition vers les soins de longue durée Resources Ressources Helpful Information Caregiver Fact Sheets Publications of Interest Useful Links Wandering First Link Transition to Long Term Care For Healthcare Professionals Other Languages Renfrew County Ressources en français

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/about-dementia/ (2016-04-26)
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  • What is Dementia? | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    existing diseases or conditions that the person may have infections toxins in the environment education level alcohol and tobacco use diet and exercise Are there treatments for symptoms of Alzheimer s disease Several medications are now available to treat some symptoms of Alzheimer s disease These drugs are not a cure for the disease They do not stop its progression Ask your doctor if there is a treatment suitable for you Will my children get Alzheimer s disease The sporadic form of Alzheimer s disease which used to be called late onset Alzheimer s disease was formerly assumed to have no family linkages We now know however that a person with a direct relative parent or sibling with Alzheimer s disease has a three times greater chance of developing the disease than someone who does not The risk increases further if both parents have the disease So aside from the FAD related genes there are Alzheimer s disease related genetic factors shared by family members A very small percentage of people have an inherited form of the disease This rare form is called familial autosomal dominant FAD Alzheimer s disease In certain families it passes directly from one generation to another Having more than one family member with Alzheimer s disease does not necessarily mean that your family has the inherited form Is there genetic testing for Alzheimer s disease Genetic testing for the disease is not widely available in Canada It is usually limited to people with a strong family history of the disease who are enrolled in specific research studies Some testing is also done on referral from a family physician You cannot request genetic testing on behalf of another family member How does Alzheimer s disease progress Alzheimer s disease typically follows certain stages that cause changes in the person s and family s lives Because the disease affects each individual differently the symptoms the order in which they appear and the duration of each stage vary from person to person In most cases the disease progresses slowly and the symptoms of each stage may overlap often making the move from one stage to another quite subtle The duration of the disease is usually seven to ten years but may be much longer in some people What are related dementias Related dementias include vascular dementia frontotemporal dementia including Pick s disease Creutzfeldt Jakob disease and Lewy body dementia Each of the related dementias has unique aspects but all share common symptoms gradual and ongoing decline of short and long term memory changes in language abilities mood and behaviour judgment and reasoning making it impossible over time to perform simple tasks Dementia eventually affects all aspects of a person s life including how the person thinks feels acts and reacts to his environment Currently there is no known cure for these diseases but studies show that lifestyle changes can help slow the progression of the disease Researchers are confident that within seven to ten years there will be

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/about-dementia/what-is-dementia/ (2016-04-26)
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  • 10 Warning Signs | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    her sentences difficult to understand 4 Disorientation of time and place It s normal to forget the day of the week or your destination for a moment But a person with Alzheimer s disease can become lost on their own street not knowing how they got there or how to get home 5 Poor or decreased judgment People may sometimes put off going to a doctor if they have an infection but eventually seek medical attention A person with Alzheimer s disease may have decreased judgment for example not recognizing a medical problem that needs attention or wearing heavy clothing on a hot day 6 Problems with abstract thinking From time to time people may have difficulty with tasks that require abstract thinking such as balancing a cheque book Someone with Alzheimer s disease may have significant difficulties with such tasks for example not recognizing what the numbers in the cheque book mean 7 Misplacing things Anyone can temporarily misplace a wallet or keys A person with Alzheimer s disease may put things in inappropriate places an iron in the freezer or a wristwatch in the sugar bowl 8 Changes in mood and behaviour Everyone becomes sad or moody from time to time Someone with Alzheimer s disease can exhibit varied mood swings from calm to tears to anger for no apparent reason 9 Changes in personality People s personalities can change somewhat with age But a person with Alzheimer s disease can become confused suspicious or withdrawn Changes may also include apathy fearfulness or acting out of character 10 Loss of initiative It s normal to tire of housework business activities or social obligations but most people regain their initiative A person with Alzheimer s disease may become very passive and require cues and prompting to become involved About Dementia What is Dementia 10 Warning Signs Stages of the Disease Benefits of Early Diagnosis ReThink Dementia Questions Statistics Research Recent Presentations Our Contribution to Research Alzheimer Society Research Program Local Trials Studies Invite a Speaker La maladie En quoi consistent l Alzheimer et maladies apparentées 10 signes précurseurs Les stades de la maladie d Alzheimer Avantages du diagnostic précoce Les Démences On Y Repense Living With Dementia I Have Dementia Planning for the Future Legal and Financial Health and Personal Care Driving and Dementia Caring for Yourself Caring for Someone with Dementia Care Planning Checklist Understanding Behaviour Take Care of Yourself Long Distance Caregiving Safety in the Home Long Term Care Community Dementia Services Rethink Dementia Conference Quotidien J ai la maladie Planifier l avenir S occuper de quelqu un Get Help We re Here to Help Support Soutien Ottawa Minds in Motion Minds In Song Drop in and Connect Support Groups Individuals in Early Stages of Dementia Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Renfrew County Drop In and Connect Support Groups Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Soutien en français Café rencontre Groupes de soutien Groupe de soutien pour les familles francophones Soutien individuel Education Éducation

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/about-dementia/10-warning-signs/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Stages of the Disease | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    decisions A guiding principle should be to uphold his dignity privacy and safety When making decisions on behalf of another person it is important to follow the person s wishes if they are known If they have not been communicated knowing his values and beliefs can help you make a decision that most closely resembles the one he would have made Some people may have an Advance Directive or living will that will help family members carry out the wishes of the person with dementia If plans have not been made or if family members disagree you may want to consider asking a third party such as a member of the health care team clergy or counsellor to help You will continue to make decisions regarding care strategies throughout the disease process These decisions should take into consideration the progression of the disease the overall health of the person with dementia and risks and benefits of care strategies Decisions that you might face include treating a broken hip after a fall or choosing whether or not to begin tube feeding Continued communication with the doctor and other members of the health care team will be important during this time People in the late stage Experience severe loss of memory ability to process information and understanding of time and place Lose their ability to speak although they may still say words or phrases Non verbal communication will become more important May rock back and forth or keep calling out the same sound or word They may also constantly wring their hands pull at their clothes tap or fidget They may even touch themselves inappropriately in public Become more agitated in the late afternoon and early evening a phenomenon often called sundowning Need help with eating and using the toilet They often cannot control passing of urine and stool Lose the ability to walk without help then the ability to sit without support the ability to smile and the ability to hold their head up The brain appears to no longer be able to tell the body what to do Cannot swallow properly May lose weight In many cases those with late stage Alzheimer s disease need to live in a care facility If they are at home they need added support People with late stage Alzheimer s disease cannot think of or start activities on their own So whether they are at home or in a facility the goal for late stage Alzheimer care should be making the person s quality of life as good as it can be to be at the highest level of well being possible physically mentally and emotionally Activities should fit whatever strengths and abilities the person with Alzheimer s disease has taking into account the person s life history likes and dislikes End of Life The experience of dying is different for each person It comes in its own time and its own way However the process of dying often follows a somewhat predictable path

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/stages-of-the-disease/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Benefits of Early Diagnosis | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    fully in his own health care decisions and future plans 3 Using medications effectively Treatment of Alzheimer s disease and other dementias is typically most effective when started early in the disease process 4 Focusing on what s important An early diagnosis allows the person to set priorities based on what is important to them such as travelling pursuing new goals or deciding when to stop working 5 Making choices is empowering An early diagnosis allows the person with dementia to make informed decisions about legal financial and care matters and make their wishes known to their family and friends 6 Taking advantage of resources The person and their family can benefit from local Alzheimer Society information support and education programs to learn how to live well with dementia 7 Supporting families Families who understand the disease and the challenges that come with its progression are better able to support the person with dementia and get the help that s right for them 8 Advocating People with dementia can make their voices heard to raise awareness about the disease the need for quality care and increased funding for research 9 Advancing research People with dementia can participate in clinical trials and other research to help improve diagnosis and enhance care 10 Reducing stigma People with dementia can continue to live life to the fullest Sharing experiences of living with dementia can be very helpful in reducing the stigma of the disease and in encouraging others to reach out for support The Alzheimer Society acknowledges the Alzheimer s Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin for their website content which has been modified with permission Helpful Materials Be a stigma buster Combattez les préjugés About Dementia What is Dementia 10 Warning Signs Stages of the Disease Benefits of Early Diagnosis ReThink Dementia Questions Statistics Research Recent Presentations Our Contribution to Research Alzheimer Society Research Program Local Trials Studies Invite a Speaker La maladie En quoi consistent l Alzheimer et maladies apparentées 10 signes précurseurs Les stades de la maladie d Alzheimer Avantages du diagnostic précoce Les Démences On Y Repense Living With Dementia I Have Dementia Planning for the Future Legal and Financial Health and Personal Care Driving and Dementia Caring for Yourself Caring for Someone with Dementia Care Planning Checklist Understanding Behaviour Take Care of Yourself Long Distance Caregiving Safety in the Home Long Term Care Community Dementia Services Rethink Dementia Conference Quotidien J ai la maladie Planifier l avenir S occuper de quelqu un Get Help We re Here to Help Support Soutien Ottawa Minds in Motion Minds In Song Drop in and Connect Support Groups Individuals in Early Stages of Dementia Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Renfrew County Drop In and Connect Support Groups Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Soutien en français Café rencontre Groupes de soutien Groupe de soutien pour les familles francophones Soutien individuel Education Éducation Other Opportunities Learn Online Webinars Interactive Learning Transition to Long Term Care Staff Families Working Together Dementia 101 Dementia

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/benefits-of-early-diagnosis/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Newsletter Sign-up | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    privacy of its donors clients members volunteers and other individuals about whom we collect personal information We strive to embrace best practices and follow the principles of the Canadian Standards Association CSA model code for the protection of personal information Read the full Privacy Policy About Dementia What is Dementia 10 Warning Signs Stages of the Disease Benefits of Early Diagnosis ReThink Dementia Questions Statistics Research Recent Presentations Our Contribution to Research Alzheimer Society Research Program Local Trials Studies Invite a Speaker La maladie En quoi consistent l Alzheimer et maladies apparentées 10 signes précurseurs Les stades de la maladie d Alzheimer Avantages du diagnostic précoce Les Démences On Y Repense Living With Dementia I Have Dementia Planning for the Future Legal and Financial Health and Personal Care Driving and Dementia Caring for Yourself Caring for Someone with Dementia Care Planning Checklist Understanding Behaviour Take Care of Yourself Long Distance Caregiving Safety in the Home Long Term Care Community Dementia Services Rethink Dementia Conference Quotidien J ai la maladie Planifier l avenir S occuper de quelqu un Get Help We re Here to Help Support Soutien Ottawa Minds in Motion Minds In Song Drop in and Connect Support Groups Individuals in Early Stages of Dementia Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Renfrew County Drop In and Connect Support Groups Caregiver Support Groups One on One Support Soutien en français Café rencontre Groupes de soutien Groupe de soutien pour les familles francophones Soutien individuel Education Éducation Other Opportunities Learn Online Webinars Interactive Learning Transition to Long Term Care Staff Families Working Together Dementia 101 Dementia 102 Communication Dementia 103 Behaviour Ottawa Free Education for Families Learning Series for Caregivers Other Opportunities Renfrew County Free Education for Families Learning Series for Caregivers Ressources éducatives en français Séries d apprentissage Webinaires Apprentissage

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/newsletter-sign-up/ (2016-04-26)
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  • Questions | Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County
    to their own expectations or the expectations they imagine others have of them by thinking about themselves and the rest that they need It is important that you set realistic limits to what you can do and it is important that you look after yourself so that you have the energy to give to caregiving Taking a break using the respite options available to you will not only help you but will also in the end help your spouse because you will return more refreshed and able to carry on My husband likes things done a certain way Will the professional caregivers know how to handle him Over the years you have learned how your husband responds to caregiving and what works You can help professional caregivers by filling out All about me It is a resource intended for people with dementia to provide health care providers with information about themselves The booklet can be filled by the person with dementia or with help from their caregiver to provide a snapshot of the person information about them as an individual such as needs preferences likes dislikes and interests This resource will enhance the quality of care and support provided by community workers as they get to know the person or while she adjusts to a new home Special Times I would like to go away on a holiday My wife is in the middle stage of the disease I find that she is more confused and does not like new places Should we go It sounds as if the trip might overwhelm your wife You may want to talk to friends and family about their thoughts on the trip and whether you might be setting yourself up for more work and worry than vacation Unfortunately there comes a time with the disease when familiar places and routine are necessary to maintain the person s level of comfort Usually at this point travel to new places will not be enjoyable for either of you I find the holidays are overwhelming for my mother who has Alzheimer s disease Do you have any tips to make it easier for both of us Keep to your mother s routine as much as possible Try to keep celebrations simple with few people Plan events at a time of day when your mother is at her best If necessary ask someone to stay with her while you go out and celebrate or when you are entertaining at home My wife has been in the hospital and has become fairly confused The doctors say it is because she is in new surroundings What should I do Provide the staff with as much information as possible on your wife You can do this by filling out a copy of All About Me a resource intended for people with dementia to provide to health care providers with information about themselves Visit regularly and ask other family members or friends to drop by Take some of your wife s belongings that are familiar to her such as an afghan pictures or her favourite magazine Understanding the Healthcare System I am nervous about having a stranger look after my husband but I know I need a break Can you help It is very natural to be concerned about someone you don t know taking care of your husband There are some things you can do to make it easier on everyone On the worker s first visit to the house you may wish to stay close by to give both your husband and the worker a chance to get to know each other Once they are comfortable you can venture out Completing the Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County s Personal Care Book provides you with an opportunity to write down everything about your husband in one spot This will give the worker the information about your husband that will help her to provide good care The home support worker who comes into the house is really a nice person but she doesn t always do things the way I want What should I do Your first step should be to talk to her about what you need her to do If that is not successful you may have to talk to her supervisor However most people find that a gentle direct approach usually works There are so many different agencies that can provide help Where do I start Start by determining what you need Is it in home respite or a day program Do you need help with housework or someone to talk to Once you have figured out what you need match your need with a service A counselor at the Alzheimer Society of Ottawa and Renfrew County CCAC Case Manager or Psychogeriatric Community Services Dementia counselor can often help you sort this out Relating and Communicating My sister has dementia Some days when I speak to her she understands On other days it is almost like there is a wall between us and nothing seems to be understood This is not uncommon with dementia There are some days that are good and other days where the person s abilities are limited On the days when you are having problems you will need a lot of patience Try to understand both your sister s verbal and non verbal communication Sometimes a person s non verbal communication can tell you more than the words Try the techniques outlined in the Alzheimer Society of Canada s Day to Day sheet on Communication Unfortunately there will be times when you and your sister will not understand each other s words At that point it will be extremely important to show your sister that you care and that you are trying to understand her as she will most likely be frustrated too My husband and I have been married for a long time Lately he seems to want to have sex more often It is not that I don t love

    Original URL path: http://alzheimerottawa.ca/questions/ (2016-04-26)
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