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  • Canada must be “Open for Justice” - organizations call for action for overseas victims of Canadian companies | Amnesty International Canada
    University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Media Awards Multimedia Canada must be Open for Justice organizations call for action for overseas victims of Canadian companies News releases October 22 2013 People who have been harmed by Canadian mining oil and gas companies overseas may soon be able to bring their cases to Canada Today 23 Canadian organizations and their international allies issued a call to action to Members of Parliament and all Canadians to ensure that victims of Canadian corporate abuse abroad can access justice in Canada The call to action addresses two key barriers to justice weak out of court mechanisms and obstacles to suing in Canadian courts It is time for Canada to create a mandatory extractive sector Ombudsman and to legislate access to courts for people who are harmed by the overseas operations of Canadian oil mining and gas companies said Emily Dwyer Coordinator of the Canadian Network on Corporate Accountability CNCA Canada s voluntary Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor has proved hopelessly ineffective since the Office was established in 2009 We brought the first case to the CSR Counsellor s Office in 2011 when Mexican workers were harassed and intimidated because they tried to unionize at a Canadian mine said Valeria Scorza ProDESC Mexico Even though the Counsellor found that our complaint was made in good faith and met all the criteria she couldn t do anything because the company wasn t willing to participate Ms Scorza s experience is not unique no complaint has ever gone through a full review process In most cases the company has simply walked away Even the now disbanded advisory panel to the CSR Counsellor recognizes the Office is deeply flawed A Canadian company implicated in human rights abuses should not be able to put a stop to a complaint process said Ken Neumann National Director for the United Steelworkers Union An independent decision maker should be making that decision based on the merits of the case Companies regularly try to hide from accountability by insisting that cases related to their overseas operations should not be heard by Canadian courts In our globalized world we can t hide behind

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/news/news-releases/canada-must-be-%E2%80%9Copen-for-justice%E2%80%9D-organizations-call-for-action-for-overseas-vict (2016-02-13)
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  • Open for Justice Rally | Amnesty International Canada
    Torture Act Stop Torture Learn Stop Torture Share Stop Torture Tools Priority Countries Canada Human Rights Agenda for Canada 2015 Canada Votes 2015 What you can do Questions for Candidates No Giving Up A year of challenges and determination China Colombia Colombia Indigenous Survival Make it Visible Slideshow Take Action This is what we Demand Art Project Background Resources Donate Contact Mexico Zimbabwe Russia Central African Republic The Rebellion in the Middle East and North Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Open for Justice Rally May 14 2014 On a sunny day in Ottawa hundreds of Canadians from coast to coast gathered on Parliament Hill to call on the Canadian government to hold extractive companies accountable for their mining activities overseas Specifically we demanded that Canada to be Open for Justice At the rally Amnesty International Development and Peace Kairos Inter Pares and the United Steelworkers Humanity Fund personally delivered boxes containing more than 80 000 thousand letters to Members of Parliament Many MPs were at the rally to receive

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/open-for-justice-rally (2016-02-13)
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  • Syria: stop enforced disappearances | Amnesty International Canada
    do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Our Work Get Involved Donate About Us Syria stop enforced disappearances Thursday November 8 2012 00 00 I will crush the throat of your son return him back to you like Ghayath Mattar Threat reportedly said by the leader of the raid on Muhammad Yassin Al Hamwi s apartment Syrian activist Ghayath Mattar died in custody four days after his arrest on September 6 2011 On September 23 2011 more than 20 uniformed and plain clothed members of security forces believed to be Air Force Intelligence arrived at the apartment of 65 year old Muhammad Yassin Al Hamwi also known as Abu Haytham looking for his 22 year old son Muhammad Muhammad Al Hamwi who was visiting friends elsewhere in the building The security forces arrested Muhammad Yassin Al Hamwi confiscated digital equipment and other items from the apartment and destroyed property They then proceeded to arrest Muhammad Muhammad Al Hamwi along with two other men he had been visiting 34 year old Ahmad Kuraitem and 22 year old Shaker al Masri All four men remain detained incommunicado at an unknown location Since protests broke out in Syria in February 2011 thousands of suspected government opponents have been arrested and not heard of for long periods of time Some subjected to enforced disappearance were released after months of secret or incommunicado detention Others remain disappeared The authorities refuse to disclose any information about their whereabouts or well being leaving their families in anguish Though the practice has significantly increased during the current unrest Amnesty International has been documenting cases of enforced disappearance in Syria since the late 1970s An enforced disappearance takes place when a person is arrested detained or abducted by the state or agents acting for the state who then deny that the person is being held or conceal their whereabouts placing them outside the protection of the law Enforced disappearances are crimes under international law In Syria the practice is part of a widespread and systematic attack against the civilian population making these disappearances also crimes against humanity Take Action Please send messages to Bashar al Assad the President of Syria calling on him to disclose the whereabouts and fate of 22 men including Muhammad Yassin Al Hamwi who disappeared following their arrests The most reliable way to reach authorities in Syria is by fax though you may have to try dialing several times Please adapt the sample text below you can also print it as a pdf using the link on the right hand sidebar Write To His Excellency President Bashar al Assad President Syrian Arab Republic Fax 963 11 332 3410 Salutation Your Excellency Copies To Major General Mohamad Ibrahim al Shaar Minister of Interior Fax 963 11 211 9578 His Excellency Imad al Fraij Minister of Defence Fax 963 11 223 7842 or 963 11 666

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/take-action-now/syria-stop-enforced-disappearances (2016-02-13)
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  • Canada: No more Stolen Sisters | Amnesty International Canada
    One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Our Work Get Involved Donate About Us Canada No more Stolen Sisters Tuesday May 6 2014 00 00 Hundreds upon hundreds of our sisters and daughters have gone missing or been murdered Putting a few dollars into the kind of police work that happens anyway is not a solution We need a concrete national plan of action that will bring real change in our lives Bernadette Smith sister of 21 year old Claudette Osborne who vanished from Winnipeg in July 2008 In May 2014 for the first time ever the RCMP released figures on the scale and scope of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada Their figures show that 1 017 Indigenous women were murdered between 1980 and 2012 a homicide rate at least four times higher than that faced by all other women in Canada But even these figures may underestimate the scale and severity of the threat to Indigenous women s lives since many police forces still routinely fail to record whether or not the victims of violent crime are Indigenous The federal government has acknowledged that the violence faced by Indigenous women is rooted in discrimination impoverishment and inequality Government officials have repeatedly stated that the situation demands action not more study But measures to date have been woefully inadequate to address the scale and severity of the violence or to deal with the underlying factors of discrimination and poverty that contribute to the threats to Indigenous women and girls The federal response has focused primarily on police tools and powers This is not enough A more comprehensive response is needed to address the discrimination and inequality that puts Indigenous women at risk or denies them adequate protection A national action plan and a national public inquiry are both needed if Canada wants to seriously tackle the high rates of violence experienced by Indigenous women and girls Across Canada Indigenous women s organizations provincial and territorial governments and a wide range of social justice organizations have called for a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women An inquiry doesn t have to be just another study An inquiry can be a crucial tool to ensure that government listens to the affected families and communities who best understand the issues and acts on the solutions that they have already identified Canada has an international human rights obligation to enact a national action plan on violence

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/take-action-now/canada-no-more-stolen-sisters (2016-02-13)
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  • Colombia: Take action for the survival of Indigenous peoples | Amnesty International Canada
    Agenda for Canada 2015 Canada Votes 2015 What you can do Questions for Candidates No Giving Up A year of challenges and determination China Colombia Colombia Indigenous Survival Make it Visible Slideshow Take Action This is what we Demand Art Project Background Resources Donate Contact Mexico Zimbabwe Russia Central African Republic The Rebellion in the Middle East and North Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Our Work Get Involved Donate About Us Colombia Take action for the survival of Indigenous peoples Wednesday December 19 2012 00 00 Take action Many people have felt compelled to flee but displacement is a huge threat to our survival We fear the Wayúu will become completely extinct testimony of the Wayúu Indigenous Nation Colombia March 2012 At least one in three Indigenous nations in Colombia distinct cultures and societies like the Wayúu people face an urgent threat of total destruction The causes the impact of armed conflict unrestrained resource development on their lands and the failure of the Colombian government to uphold their rights

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/take-action-now/colombia-take-action-for-the-survival-of-indigenous-peoples (2016-02-13)
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  • Compelling reasons to celebrate the International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples | Amnesty International Canada
    Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Compelling reasons to celebrate the International Day of the World s Indigenous Peoples Friday August 8 2014 10 30 We lived at the side of the road we lived badly Several members of the community died in accidents of disease Nobody respected us Now this is our victory I am very happy and I cry because my grandmother my father and many members of my family did not have the opportunity I have today to enjoy our land I m grateful to everyone Aparicia Gonzalez an Indigenous Enxet woman from the Sawhoyamaxa community in Paraguay This week as the United Nations marks the International Day of the World s Indigenous Peoples August 9th we want to take a moment to celebrate two crucial recent victories in the long struggle for the recognition of the rights of Indigenous peoples On June 26 the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Tsilhqot in people had proven their continued ownership of and right to control a large swath of land in the heart of their traditional territory The landmark decision at long last moves the constitutional recognition of Indigenous land title previously largely abstract and routinely ignored into the realm of practical reality Earlier in June the President of Paraguay enacted a law that will allow the return of more than 14 400 hectares of land to the Sawhoyamaxa a community of the Enxet Indigenous people The community s legal battle for recognition of their land rights which began in 1991 eventually went to the Inter American Court of Human Rights Throughout this time community members have lived in deplorable conditions in a precariously narrow strip of land between a major highway and the lands that had been taken from them In regional overview released today Amnesty International called recognition of the land rights of the Sawhoyamaxa and Tsilhqot in victories of great importance

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/compelling-reasons-to-celebrate-the-international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-peoples (2016-02-13)
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  • Joint Statement Supporting Chief Spence and "Idle No More" | Amnesty International Canada
    a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Media Awards Multimedia Joint Statement Supporting Chief Spence and Idle No More Public statements January 02 2013 Indigenous and human rights organizations stand in solidarity with Chief Theresa Spence in her appeal for full respect for Aboriginal and Treaty rights by the government of Canada There is an urgent need for Canada to demonstrate genuine respect and long term commitment initiated by a meeting between First Nations leadership the Prime Minister and the Governor General Take Action Tell Prime Minister Harper that the Canadian government must uphold its legal and moral obligations to Indigenous peoples Full honour and implementation of Indigenous peoples Treaties are crucial to the evolution of Canada and the principle of federalism Cooperative and harmonious relations cannot be achieved by devaluing Treaties or by unilateral government actions We firmly support grassroots actions of the Idle No More movement It has put the spotlight on federal policy and legislative agendas that are trampling the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples affirmed in domestic and international law Human rights not colonialism In 2012 the Supreme Court of Canada highlighted the history of colonialism displacement and residential schools and how that history continues to translate into lower educational attainment lower incomes higher unemployment higher rates of substance abuse and suicide and higher levels of incarceration Canada must abandon out dated discriminatory approaches from the colonial era especially in relation to Indigenous peoples lands territories and resources What is urgently required is a principled framework consistent with international human rights law Currently countless amendments and laws are being adopted that undermine Indigenous peoples human rights including Treaty rights These legislative measures were developed with little or no consultation with Aboriginal peoples and without their consent Such actions erode democracy the rule of law and integrity of Parliament Indigenous peoples rights and related government duties are an integral part of Canada s Constitution They are affirmed in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples The government should address this grievous situation in good faith Justice peace and reconciliation remain crucial objectives The omnibus budget bill C 45 introduced far reaching changes Amendments include changes to complex land provisions in the Indian Act that compound existing problems It also re writes environmental laws including Navigable Waters Protection Act Fisheries Act and Hazardous Materials Information Review Act which were used to promote and protect a sustainable environment clean water and healthy oceans The integrity of the environment is being assaulted to the detriment of present and future generations Canada is estimated to contain nearly 32 000 major lakes and more than 2 25 million rivers Yet a new Navigation Protection

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/news/public-statements/joint-statement-supporting-chief-spence-and-idle-no-more (2016-02-13)
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  • How long will government turn its back on Grassy Narrows? | Amnesty International Canada
    Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home How long will government turn its back on Grassy Narrows Wednesday August 27 2014 10 56 It is long past time for the government to take responsibility to fix what they have broken clean up our river and help us out rather than kicking us while we are down Grassy Narrows Chief Roger Fobister Sr For almost a decade Amnesty International has stood with the people of Grassy Narrows in their long struggle to determine for themselves the fate of the forest and waters on which they depend This campaign led by the people of Grassy Narrow and supported by a wide range of social justice and environmental organizations has had remarkable success with company after company announcing that they will not log at Grassy Narrows or handle wood cut at Grassy Narrows unless the community gives its consent These remarkable victories however have taken place against the backdrop of an ongoing unresolved and largely unacknowledged tragedy Throughout the 1960s an upstream pulp and paper mill dumped approximately 20 000 pounds or 9 metric tonnes of mercury into rivers and lakes vital to the people of the Grassy Narrows and the neighboring White Dog First Nation When the contamination was discovered in 1970 there were already signs of severe mercury poisoning including loss of muscle control and other neurological degeneration among fishers guides and others who regularly ate fish from the contaminated waters In the decades that have followed community members have reported an ongoing health crisis with high rates of neurological impairments and other chronic illnesses Tragically these chronic problems are even hurting young people born long after the communities were assured that their waters would be safe again Despite this the provincial government has never publicly acknowledged that mercury dumping which it permitted has led to mercury poisoning at Grassy Narrows and Whitedog The limited compensation that is provided to people with symptoms associated with mercury poisoning is based on outdated models of how mercury affects

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/how-long-will-government-turn-its-back-on-grassy-narrows (2016-02-13)
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