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  • Enforced Disappearances | Amnesty International Canada
    Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues International Justice Home Our Work Issues International Justice Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Enforced Disappearances The International Criminal Court Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Enforced Disappearances Even today I think maybe today tomorrow they will return my son to me Every night he appears in my sleep and during the day I cry all the time That is not a life anymore For me everything came to a halt I don t live I just walk over the earth Bilat Akhmatkhanova mother of Artur Akhamatkhanov who was subject to enforced disappearance in Grozny capital of the Chechen Republic in 2003 He was 22 years old What are enforced disappearances Enforced disappearance takes place when a person is

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/international-justice/enforced-disappearances (2016-02-13)
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  • The International Criminal Court | Amnesty International Canada
    Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues International Justice Home Our Work Issues International Justice Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Enforced Disappearances The International Criminal Court Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects The International Criminal Court The International Criminal Court Overview The establishment of a new permanent International Criminal Court ICC in 2002 represents a major breakthrough in international justice The ICC is the world s first permanent international judicial body capable of bringing perpetrators of genocide crimes against humanity and war crimes to justice and providing reparation to victims when states are unable or unwilling genuinely to do so Since the adoption of the treaty establishing the ICC known as the Rome Statute almost two thirds of UN member states have ratified it Only a handful of

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/international-justice/the-international-criminal-court (2016-02-13)
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  • Indigenous Peoples | Amnesty International Canada
    countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Home Our Work Issues Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples Overview In very plain terms the focus of our work is to arrive at a place where Indigenous peoples can actually exercise and enjoy our individual and collective rights without obstruction It s that simple Dalee Sambo Dorough Inuit Circumpolar Council After nearly a decade crucial case before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal concludes with landmark victory for First Nations children Learn more Centuries of racism and dispossession have denied Indigenous peoples the opportunity to enjoy their basic human rights In every continent in the world Indigenous peoples are among the most marginalized impoverished and frequently victimized members of society In the face of widespread violence and oppression Indigenous peoples are standing up for their rights and challenging the international

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples (2016-02-13)
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  • Indigenous Peoples in Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    in Canada Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Indigenous Peoples in Canada Canada must now work out fair and lasting terms of coexistence with Aboriginal people Canada s claim to be a fair and enlightened society depends on it Recommendation of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples 1996 New action appeal on proposed Site C dam For decades high level government inquiries federal audits and international human rights bodies have repeatedly and consistently pointed to an unacceptable gap between Indigenous and non Indigenous peoples in the enjoyment of basic human rights Despite living in one of the world s wealthiest countries Indigenous families and communities in Canada continue to face widespread impoverishment inadequate housing food insecurity ill health and unsafe drinking water Indigenous peoples have demonstrated extraordinary resilience in the face of historic programs and policies such as the residential school program that were meant to destroy their cultures but they must still live with the largely unresolved legacy of the harm that was done The Canadian Government Government services needed to improve people s lives and address the legacy of past wrongs often fall far short of what is needed The federal government s repeatedly claims to spend large amounts of money on Indigenous peoples But the reality is that despite the urgent and pressing needs of Indigenous peoples funding for many basic services for Indigenous peoples is often significantly less than what is provided in predominantly non Indigenous communities A National Commitment The Canadian Constitution affirms the inherent rights of Indigenous peoples and the Treaties that they have entered into with Canada Canadian courts have called the protection of Indigenous rights an underlying constitutional value a national commitment and a matter of public interest Governments in Canada are supposed to act as guarantors of these rights Instead in positions taken during negotiations and before courts governments in Canada have consistently sought to minimize their responsibilities Processes to resolve disputes over Indigenous land rights are so adversarial prolonged and costly that the Inter Commission on Human Rights has concluded that lands claims processes in Canada don t meet international standards of justice Land and Water The widespread failure to protect Indigenous peoples rights to lands and resources or to ensure timely resolution of outstanding land disputes undermines the ability of Indigenous peoples to maintain ways of living on the land that are vital to their cultures health and well being It also denies Indigenous peoples the opportunity to make their own decisions about the best forms of economic development needed to meet the needs and aspirations of their

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada (2016-02-13)
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  • Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada It is so disappointing to see the federal government put its interests ahead of the interests of children again by pursuing these legal technicalities Dr Cindy Blackstock Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society The federal government s underfunding of services for First Nations children living on reserves has created a crisis situation for these children and their families Learn more Today more First Nations children are being taken away from their families than at the height of the residential school era This is happening because their families may not have the resources to meet all their needs and because child welfare services in First Nations communities also don t have the resources that are urgently needed to support these families At the heart of the problem is the fact that the federal government s budget for children s services in First Nations communities is at least 22 less per child than what the provincial governments dedicate for child welfare services in other communities This is despite often greater needs and the higher costs of delivering services

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada/discrimination-against-first-nations (2016-02-13)
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  • Resource Development in Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Northern Gateway Pipeline debate Site C Dam Human Rights at Risk The Lubicon Cree Ongoing human rights violations Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Resource Development in Canada Reconciliation requires a more generous and flexible approach that seeks to identify and create common ground Further as a general rule resource extraction should not occur on lands subject to aboriginal claims without the free prior and informed consent of the aboriginal peoples concerned United Nations Special Rapporteur James Anaya at the conclusion of his 2013 official mission to Canada New action appeal on proposed Site C dam The federal government has predicted that more than 600 major resource development projects will get underway across Canada over the next decade In northern and central British Columbia alone 100 major projects in mining forestry and other industries are currently underway or under development The vast majority of proposed resource development projects in Canada will affect lands and waters that are vital to the cultures and economies of First Nations Inuit and Métis peoples Canadian and international law require rigorous protections for Indigenous peoples relationships with

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada/resource-development-in-canada (2016-02-13)
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  • Northern Gateway Pipeline debate | Amnesty International Canada
    in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Resource Development in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Resource Development in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Northern Gateway Pipeline debate Site C Dam Human Rights at Risk The Lubicon Cree Ongoing human rights violations Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Northern Gateway Pipeline debate The Northern Gateway Project is a proposal to build two parallel pipelines to connect the Alberta oil sands to the British Columbia coast One pipeline is intended to carry a daily average of 525 000 barrels of oil sands bitumen oil and industrial chemicals to a proposed facility in Kitimat B C where the bitumen and oil would be loaded onto tankers for export including to new markets in Asia The other pipeline would carry industrial chemicals to the oil sands for the extraction and transport of bitumen If the project goes ahead it would lead to pipeline construction across roughly 1000 rivers and streams in the traditional territories of Indigenous peoples in Alberta and British Columbia the transport of bitumen oil and industrial chemicals across these territories and through coastal waters vital to other Indigenous nations and ultimately contribute to increased demand for oil sands extraction on Indigenous territories in Alberta The majority of First Nations whose traditional lands would be crossed by the proposed Northern Gateway project have opposed the pipeline as have First Nations who depend on the downstream rivers and coastal waters In March 2010 nine First Nations in B C issued their own ban on tanker traffic in the coastal waters of their territories In December 2011 61 First Nations with territory in the largest watershed on the proposed pipeline route issued a declaration denouncing Northern Gateway as a grave threat to our laws traditions values and our inherent rights as Indigenous peoples The Northern Gateway proposal was the subject of a lengthy

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/resource-development-in-canada/northern-gateway-pipeline-debate (2016-02-13)
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  • Site C Dam - Human Rights at Risk | Amnesty International Canada
    the very few areas in the region that so far has been largely preserved from large scale resource development First Nations and Métis families and communities rely on the valley for hunting and fishing gathering berries and sacred medicine and holding ceremonies Their ancestors are buried in this land The proposed 8 billion plus Site C hydroelectric dam would flood more than 80 km of the river valley stretching west from Fort St John The severe impact on Indigenous peoples is beyond dispute A joint federal province environmental impact assessment concluded that the dam would severely undermine use of the land would make fishing unsafe for at least a generation and would submerge burial grounds and other crucial cultural and historical sites The West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations have gone to court to protect their traditional lands Their struggle has been supported by the Union of BC Indian Chiefs the Assembly of First Nations and many others including local farmers and other landowners in the Peace Valley An urgent situation BC Hydro is not waiting for the resolution of the outstanding legal issues that are still before the courts The provincial utility has begun clear cutting great swaths of the Peace Valley floor destroying the unique plant and animal habitat that is at the heart of the First Nations legal challenge to the project A small group of residents calling themselves the Treaty 8 Stewards of the Land have set up a camp at an historic site in the path of the logging Their actions have at least temporarily stopped the logging but the camp members are risking arrest for their action Helen Knott one of the Stewards of the Land has said before the court cases are even heard BC Hydro is destroying the very valley that these court cases are intended to protect The way I see it they are stealing from future generations both Indigenous and non Indigenous We are not here just for us but for the ones that will come after us The Treaty 8 Stewards of the Land are calling on the Prime Minister to honour his promise to uphold the Treaties by stepping in and cancelling all federal permits for the dam Read more Site C violates human rights Government officials in British Columbia say that they have consulted with Indigenous peoples about Site C But consultation is not supposed to be a hollow exercise it s purpose is to protect the underlying rights set out in Treaties the Canadian Constitution and in international human rights law The rights have not been protected In fact they ve been largely ignored The federal and provincial governments have not even assessed whether the harm that caused by the dam is compatible with Canada s Treaty obligations And there has been no serious consideration of the possibility that the harm done to Indigenous peoples being so great that the best course of action would be to find another source of energy Amnesty International is

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada/resource-development-in-canada/site (2016-02-13)
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