archive-ca.com » CA » A » AMNESTY.CA

Total: 947

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Supreme Court ruling: Issue of logging at Grassy Narrows still unresolved | Amnesty International Canada
    Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Supreme Court ruling Issue of logging at Grassy Narrows still unresolved Friday July 11 2014 11 58 Trapper Andrew Keewatin Jr at Grassy Narrows Today s Supreme Court ruling on logging at Grassy Narrows reaffirms important limitations on the power of governments in Canada to make decisions that could undermine the ability of Indigenous peoples to live off the land The court case was initiated by Grassy Narrows trappers whose traplines were threatened by clearcut logging licensed by the Ontario government In the original trial decision an Ontario court concluded that because of the terms of the Treaty and the particular history of the region only the federal government not the provincial government has the authority to make decisions about development on the portion of the Grassy Narrows traditional territory called the Keewatin area The Supreme Court rejected this argument concluding instead that the powers of the Crown to take up Treaty lands applied to the provincial government However the Court also stated that the legal obligations and restrictions on Crown powers resulting from the Treaty must also apply to the province The Court stated The promises made in Treaty 3 were promises of the Crown not those of Canada Both levels of government are responsible for fulfilling these promises when acting within the division of powers under the Constitution Act 1867 The Supreme Court ruling goes on to state that the harvesting rights of the Ojibway over the land must be respected and that any decisions by the province to permit logging or other development of the land must fulfill the standard of consultation and accommodation of Indigenous rights and interests that is

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/supreme-court-ruling-issue-of-logging-at-grassy-narrows-still-unresolved (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ‘A place to regain who we are': Grassy Narrows First Nation, Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    Torture Share Stop Torture Tools Priority Countries Canada Human Rights Agenda for Canada 2015 Canada Votes 2015 What you can do Questions for Candidates No Giving Up A year of challenges and determination China Colombia Colombia Indigenous Survival Make it Visible Slideshow Take Action This is what we Demand Art Project Background Resources Donate Contact Mexico Zimbabwe Russia Central African Republic The Rebellion in the Middle East and North Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Secondary links News Events Blog Research Store Write for Rights A place to regain who we are Grassy Narrows First Nation Canada In the 1960s the river system that runs through Grassy Narrows First Nation was contaminated by mercury research June 21 2009 The Indigenous community of Grassy Narrows in north western Ontario Canada has experienced decades of suffering and dislocation This has included among other violations of their rights flooding of their traditional territory leading to the loss of wild rice crops wildlife habitat and heritage sites relocation of the community mercury contamination of

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/research/reports/%E2%80%98a-place-to-regain-who-we-are-grassy-narrows-first-nation-canada (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • What exactly is a National Inquiry? #MMIW #OurInquiry | Amnesty International Canada
    so many years as part of our No More Stolen Sisters campaign they are in our thoughts today and every day In the lead up to this announcement many questions What exactly is a National Inquiry What can it accomplish How will the voices of Indigenous women and girls and family members be heard To help answer some of these questions and to assist those involved in preparations for the National Inquiry the Legal Strategy Coalition on Violence Against Indigenous Women LSC a nation wide ad hoc coalition of groups and individuals has released a Frequently Asked Questions Resource on Public Inquiries This document is informed by an overview of applicable law as well as an assessment of what past public inquiries have done The responses to these FAQs contain information rather than advice They are limited to a description of what inquiries can do and how commissions of inquiry identify and perform their mandates This is a publicly accessible document that includes helpful links and a suggested reading list for members of the public who would like to look into certain issues in greater detail on their own Following are a few excerpts from the FAQ Can an inquiry examine individual cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls It is important for the future Inquiry to ensure that all investigations of missing and murdered women are thorough and unbiased It is also important to review cases in a way that highlights both positive practices where they exist as well as system failings that need to be addressed If this is consistent with the Commission of Inquiry s terms of reference it may be possible for it to examine individual cases However given the high volume of implicated cases individual case reviews for all past cases may not be feasible More importantly a public inquiry may not be the most helpful or advantageous way to review individual cases Rather an independent civilian investigation unit whose sole purpose and focus is to investigate individual cases may be appropriate Such a unit could liaise with the Commission but its mandate could extend beyond the life of the Commission Ultimately it will be important to ensure that any inquiry or civilian investigation unit reviewing individual cases is independent from government and accountable Who will be able to participate in these proceedings Participation in an inquiry may depend on the type or format of the proceedings For open and informal proceedings the Commission may encourage widespread public participation usually by means of written comments submitted on paper or electronically or by presenting to Commissioners in person with the possibility of skype and other accessible means Adversarial hearings may require standing to participate This means that people who want to participate in the hearing process will need to establish either 1 how they are affected by the issues being addressed in the hearing or 2 how their participation would further the public interest In this situation the Commission would have the discretion to

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/what-exactly-national-inquiry-mmiw-ourinquiry (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New statistics on violence against Aboriginal people released | Amnesty International Canada
    Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home New statistics on violence against Aboriginal people released Wednesday November 25 2015 13 39 Photo Credit Still Dancing is by Canadian Indigenous artist Jonathan Labillois A new report released today by Statistics Canada shows that Indigenous people are six times more likely than other people in Canada to be murdered Amnesty International has long called for systematic publicly available data on the Aboriginal identity of both the victims and perpetrators of violence Such data can be crucial to better understand and eliminate violence When the first national statistics on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls were released in 2014 by the RCMP Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women An National Operational Overview the data was widely misrepresented and oversimplified in public debate The numbers show a complex and pervasive pattern of violence against Indigenous women and girls Amnesty International is still reviewing the data in the latest report but we feel it is important to emphasize the following Both Aboriginal women and men face a much heightened risk of being murdered Between 2001 and 2014 Aboriginal women were six times more likely than non Aboriginal women to be murdered In 2014 Aboriginal men were seven times more likely than non Aboriginal men to be murdered Both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal women are most likely to be killed by someone they know However a higher proportion of Aboriginal victims were killed by an acquaintance than non Aboriginal victims 42 versus 35 In 2014 these acquaintances included casual acquaintances 35 close friends 7 people in a business relationship 4 neighbours 2 and authority figures 2 The majority of murders of all women take place in the home But for Aboriginal women there is a notably high rate of murder outside the home In 2014 66 of Aboriginal female victims were murdered in their homes compared to 88 of non

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/new-statistics-violence-against-aboriginal-people-released (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • #MMIW - New information about ‘serial killers’ another reason why an inquiry is so urgent | Amnesty International Canada
    Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home MMIW New information about serial killers another reason why an inquiry is so urgent Tuesday November 24 2015 13 18 BY CRAIG BENJAMIN AND JACKIE HANSEN Indigenous women and girls in Canada are roughly 7 times more likely to be targeted by serial predators This is according to an article in the published this week in the Globe and Mail PLEASE SIGN AND SHARE Canadians demand No more Stolen Sisters Based on the Globe s own database of both convictions and ongoing police investigations journalists Kathryn Blaze Baum and Matthew McClearn identified 18 confirmed cases where men responsible for multiple murders serial killers were convicted of the murders of Indigenous women and girls By also including unresolved cases where a serial killer is suspected the number rises to 77 This represents less than 10 percent of established cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada We must never lose sight however of the fact that each murder represents an individual tragedy leaving behind families and communities to grieve for the loved ones who have been stolen from them And whether the number of Indigenous women and girls targeted by serial killers is 18 or 77 or an even higher number these crimes should provoke shock outrage and a demand for action The sad fact however is that for at least part of the public and media such shock and outrage is reserved for crimes when the victims are non Indigenous In 2001 journalist Warren Goulding published a book called Just Another Indian A Serial Killer and Canada s Indifference that examines a series of murders of Indigenous women in Saskatoon that went largely ignored in the press About this Goulding has said It s all part of the indifference to the lives of Aboriginal people They don t seem to matters as much as white people How much have things changed In the last two decades a powerful movement led by Indigenous women hasmade the violence faced by Indigenous women and girls such an inescapable fact of Canadian political life that it factored into the recent federal election The newly elected federal government made a national inquiry a clear priority And yet This past weekend in an editorial questioning the need for such an inquiry the National Post made the categorical claim Whatever is happening here it is not white serial killers travelling to remote aboriginal communities to hunt vulnerable women Sadly the National Post is not alone in its selective approach to the violence facing Indigenous women and girls Until recently there were

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/mmiw-new-information-about-%E2%80%98serial-killers%E2%80%99-another-reason-why-inquiry-so-urgent (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Civilian oversight needed in Val d’Or investigation of Sûreté du Québec | Amnesty International Canada
    du Québec Wednesday October 28 2015 09 34 Indigenous women from Val d Or Quebec a small town located about 500km northwest of Montreal alleged that officers from the Sûreté du Québec SQ Quebec s provincial police have committed serious crimes against them including physical and sexual assault According to a report aired last week on the Radio Canada program Enquête SQ officers are alleged to have routinely picked up women who appeared to be intoxicated drove them out of town and left them to walk home in the cold Some of the women interviewed by Radio Canada also allege that they were physically assaulted or made to perform sex acts These allegations are extremely serious But although law enforcement and government officials have known about the allegations since May it wasn t until the Radio Canada report aired that the eight officers under investigation for sexual misconduct were put on leave or transferred to administrative duty And it wasn t until last week that the investigation of the officers was transferred from the Sûreté du Québec to the Montreal Police The Government of Quebec did the right thing in taking the investigation out of the hands of the SQ But as Amnesty International Canada Francophone stated in a press statement last week this isn t good enough There is a need for a truly independent investigation into these cases and all other cases of abuse by SQ officers There needs to be civilian oversight of any investigation And careful attention needs to be given to the bigger picture of how police treat Indigenous peoples in general and Indigenous women in particular The courage to report Making the decision to file a complaint about sexual assault and abuse of power by an authority figure is an incredibly difficult thing to do Filing multiple complaints of abuse of power and sexual assault with the police with the same police force alleged to have carried out these acts requires almost unimaginable courage And then to speak publicly about these allegations to show their faces to reveal their names this is almost unheard of The women of Val d Or who so bravely came forward and publicly reported serious allegations of police misconduct must receive justice and they must receive ongoing support and protection a challenge when the very people they have filed complaints against are the police who are supposed to protect them Striking parallels Some details of the allegations in Quebec mirror a well documented pattern of police abuse in the city of Saskatoon Saskatchewan that even before it came to light publicly was known among police officers as Starlight Tours In 2001 two Saskatoon police officers were convicted of unlawful confinement for picking up an Indigenous man named Darrel Night and dropping him off on the edge of town in sub zero weather Night was lucky to have survived the ordeal When he came forward his account focused public attention on a number of suspicious freezing deaths of other Indigenous

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/civilian-oversight-needed-val-d%E2%80%99or-investigation-s%C3%BBret%C3%A9-du-qu%C3%A9bec (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls: every life should matter | Amnesty International Canada
    Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls every life should matter Friday June 19 2015 17 17 With the release of a new report today the RCMP confirmed that it is no longer attempting to track murders of First Nations Inuit and Métis women across all jurisdictions in Canada National data missing In May 2014 the RCMP released a national survey of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls Although there were critical gaps in the data that report marked the first national report of its kind and included data from the RCMP and other police services across the country However the RCMP update report issued today only included new records for cases within its own jurisdiction The report states that The RCMP does not collect and report homicide data for the over 300 non RCMP police agencies who each gave individual consent to use their data for the 2014 Overview This means for example that the new update excludes murders of Indigenous women and girls in all of Ontario and Quebec When it released its 2014 report the RCMP said it had worked with police services across Canada to establish the Indigenous identity of missing and murdered women Given the acknowledged importance of comprehensive and accurate reporting to understand and address violence against women it is nothing less than shocking that the RCMP has not continued to collaborate with other police services to maintain and make public up to date records that are truly national More than family violence Throughout the report the RCMP repeatedly emphasizes that violence within the family is a key factor in violence against all women This is undoubtedly true and the importance of effective strategies and adequate resources to address domestic violence cannot be overstated At the same time violence within the family is far from the only factor putting the lives of Indigenous women and girls at risk The 2014 RCMP report found that spouses family members and other intimates were responsible for 62 of murders of Indigenous women in Canada As is the case for all other women in Canada domestic violence may account for the majority of violence But it doesn t account for all the violence Crucially 38 of Indigenous women and girls who have been murdered were not killed by spouses or family members Their lives matter too and ongoing attention and concerted action is needed to prevent murders that occur outside the family environment The 2014 report found that almost all offenders in these cases were known to their victims So who are these offenders It should be noted that the definition of known is broad and extends to a broad category

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and-girls-every-life-should-matter (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The need for accurate and comprehensive statistics on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls | Amnesty International Canada
    obligation to do everything in their power not only to ensure that attacks on women and girls are fully investigated and those responsible brought to justice but also to address the social and economic factors putting women and girls at risk Until last year there were no official national police statistics on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls which is in itself an indication of the failure of police and government to do all they can to ensure their safety Last year when the RCMP attempted to compile its first report on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls it had to deal with the fact that police homicide reports often record the ethnic identity of victims as unknown While the RCMP claim to have successfully resolved the Indigenous identity of the majority of homicides through coordination with the original reporting police forces they acknowledge that there are no standards or training for police on how to record this information accurately and that police may simply guess or record Indigenous identity based on whether the individual looks Aboriginal to them All of this raises questions about the accuracy of the RCMP data But even taking the data at face value the information released to date demonstrates a clear need for urgent concerted action A shockingly high rate of violence According to the 2014 RCMP report at least 1 017 Indigenous women and girls were murdered between 1980 and 2012 This is in addition to 105 Indigenous women and girls who were recorded as missing under suspicious circumstances or for undetermined reasons Furthermore these figures entirely leave out the large numbers of unresolved suspicious deaths not covered by the RCMP report There are serious well documented concerns over the adequacy of police investigations when family members have concerns but there is no direct evidence of foul play Such cases continue to be excluded from the discourse Each of these deaths and disappearances should be cause for concern The need for action is even more apparent when the numbers of murders of Indigenous women and girls is compared to the overall low homicide rate in Canada In the decade covered by the RCMP report the period during which the figures are likely to be most accurate the homicide rate for Indigenous women and girls was roughly 7 times higher for Indigenous women and girls than for all other women and girls in Canada Violence in the home in the community and on the streets Like other acts of violence against women in Canada most recorded murders of Indigenous women and girls were committed by an intimate partner or family member Government officials have focused on the figure that 62 percent of murders of Indigenous women and girls reported by the RCMP were acts of domestic violence What has been ignored is that the fact that this is actually a significantly lower percentage than in the general population According to the RCMP 74 of murders of non Aboriginal women are committed by

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/the-need-for-accurate-and-comprehensive-statistics-on-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women-and (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •