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  • Honour our Stolen Sisters at a vigil on October 4 | Amnesty International Canada
    Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Our Work Get Involved Donate About Us Honour our Stolen Sisters at a vigil on October 4 Friday September 4 2015 09 05 October marks 11 years since Amnesty International released our Stolen Sisters report In 2004 our report was ground breaking and helped to shine a light on a little known Canadian human rights crisis and it promoted solutions identified by the Native Women s Association of Canada and other partners in the Indigenous community Much has changed in the past decade October 4 has become a national day to commemorate the lives of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls over 200 vigils were held across the country last year Cross country walks have been held to raise awareness Tens of thousands of petition signatures have been handed over to the federal government Provincial and territorial governments have called for a national inquiry Two federal Parliamentary Committees have studied the scope of the violence The issue has been repeatedly raised at the United Nations Three international missions came to Canada in 2013 to investigate the issue And in 2014 the RCMP for the first time ever reported figures on the scope of the violence What is missing A comprehensive national response in keeping with the scale and seriousness

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/take-action-now/honour-our-stolen-sisters-at-a-vigil-on-october-4 (2016-02-13)
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  • Canada: Tell your Member of Parliament we want no more Stolen Sisters | Amnesty International Canada
    Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Our Work Get Involved Donate About Us Canada Tell your Member of Parliament we want no more Stolen Sisters Your Member of Parliament needs to know that constituents like you are calling for a comprehensive national response to the alarmingly high rates of violence against Indigenous women Phone or meet with your Member of Parliament MP during the week of October 14 17 when MPs are home for the Thanksgiving break week to express concern about the scale of the violence and to call for a National Action Plan on violence against Indigenous women coupled with a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women Who is your MP Find out here How do I contact my MP MPs have an office in Ottawa Ontario and an office in their riding Phone the office in their riding Let the person who answers the phone know that you are a constituent and want to speak to your MP about a human rights issue Arrange to meet either by phone or in person MPs spend lots of time in Ottawa but they are usually in their home riding when the House of Commons is not sitting The House of Commons is not sitting from October 14 17 and MPs will likely be home for Thanksgiving This makes it an ideal week to book a meeting When you make your call to book a meeting be pleasant but persistent your MP is there to represent you and should make time to meet with you How to Prepare Know your subject Read up before your meeting A good place to start is Amnesty s Frequently Asked Questions document along with our Stolen Sisters and No More Stolen Sisters reports Additional information is available on our webpage Have a local angle Even though

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/take-action-now/canada-tell-your-member-of-parliament-we-want-no-more-stolen-sisters (2016-02-13)
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  • Stolen Sisters: A human rights response to discrimination and violence against Indigenous women in Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    Canada 2015 Canada Votes 2015 What you can do Questions for Candidates No Giving Up A year of challenges and determination China Colombia Colombia Indigenous Survival Make it Visible Slideshow Take Action This is what we Demand Art Project Background Resources Donate Contact Mexico Zimbabwe Russia Central African Republic The Rebellion in the Middle East and North Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Secondary links News Events Blog Research Store Write for Rights Stolen Sisters A human rights response to discrimination and violence against Indigenous women in Canada Activists show solidarity with missing and murdered women on Parliament Hill 4 October 2012 Susanne Ure Amnesty International Reports October 04 2004 Violence against women and certainly violence against Indigenous women is rarely understood as a human rights issue To the extent that governments media and the general public do consider concerns about violence against women it is more frequent for it to be described as a criminal concern or a social issue It is both of those things of course But

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/research/reports/stolen-sisters-a-human-rights-response-to-discrimination-and-violence-against-indig (2016-02-13)
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  • No More Stolen Sisters: The need for a comprehensive response to discrimination and violence against Indigenous women in Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Secondary links News Events Blog Research Store Write for Rights No More Stolen Sisters The need for a comprehensive response to discrimination and violence against Indigenous women in Canada Drum painted by artist Jay Bell Redbird Amnesty International Reports September 30 2009 Families like mine all over Canada are wondering how many more sisters and daughters we have to lose before real government action is taken Darlene Osborne whose relatives Felicia Solomon and Helen Betty Osborne were murdered Indigenous women in Canada face much higher rates of violence than other women In a 2004 Canadian government survey Indigenous women reported rates of violence including domestic violence and sexual assault 3 5 times higher than non Indigenous women Studies suggest that assaults against Indigenous women are not only more frequent they are also often particularly brutal According to another government survey young First Nations women are five times more likely than other women to die as a result of violence In October 2004 Amnesty International released a report Stolen Sisters A Human Rights Response to Discrimination and Violence against Indigenous Women in Canada which documented some of the underlying causes of violence against Indigenous women carried out by both Indigenous and non Indigenous men As the report showed widespread and entrenched racism poverty and marginalization are critical factors exposing Indigenous women to a heightened risk of violence while denying them adequate protection by police and government services

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/research/reports/no-more-stolen-sisters-the-need-for-a-comprehensive-response-to-discrimination-and- (2016-02-13)
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  • Violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada: A summary of Amnesty International's concerns and call to action | Amnesty International Canada
    Canada Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns No More Stolen Sisters Kwe Standing With Our Sisters Open for Justice Stop Torture Stop Torture Act Stop Torture Learn Stop Torture Share Stop Torture Tools Priority Countries Canada Human Rights Agenda for Canada 2015 Canada Votes 2015 What you can do Questions for Candidates No Giving Up A year of challenges and determination China Colombia Colombia Indigenous Survival Make it Visible Slideshow Take Action This is what we Demand Art Project Background Resources Donate Contact Mexico Zimbabwe Russia Central African Republic The Rebellion in the Middle East and North Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada A summary of Amnesty International s concerns and call to action The scale and severity of violence faced by Indigenous women and girls in Canada First Nations Inuit and Métis constitutes a national human rights crisis Despite the vast scale and entrenched nature of the crisis and the many calls for action made by Indigenous peoples

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/lead-in-your-community/violence-against-indigenous-women-and-girls-in-canada-a-summary (2016-02-13)
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  • Canada uses World Conference to continue indefensible attack on UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples | Amnesty International Canada
    rights as an opportunity to continue its unprincipled attack on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples On Monday the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples a high level plenary of the UN General Assembly in New York adopted a consensus statement reaffirming support for the UN Declaration Canada was the only member state to raise objections Chief Perry Bellegarde Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations said The World Conference was an opportunity for all states to reaffirm their commitment to working constructively with Indigenous peoples to uphold fundamental human rights standards Alone among all the UN members Canada instead chose to use this forum to make another unprincipled attack on those very standards The Outcome Document the product of many months of negotiations between states and Indigenous representatives prior to the World Conference calls on member states to take appropriate measures at the national level including legislative policy and administrative measures to achieve the ends of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples The Outcome Document also affirms provisions in the UN Declaration that decisions potentially affecting the rights of Indigenous peoples should be undertaken only with their free prior and informed consent After the Outcome Document was adopted Canada filed a two page statement of objections saying that it could not commit to uphold provisions in the UN Declaration that deal with free prior and informed consent FPIC if these provisions were interpreted as a veto The notion that the Declaration could be interpreted as conferring an absolute and unilateral veto power has been repeatedly raised by Canada as a justification for its continued opposition to the Declaration This claim however has no basis either in the UN Declaration or in the wider body of international law Like standards of accommodation and consent set out by the Supreme Court of Canada FPIC in international law is applied in proportion to the potential for harm to the rights of Indigenous peoples and to the strength of these rights The word veto does not appear in the UN Declaration The right of free prior and informed consent is crucial to us as self determining peoples said Matthew Coon Come Grand Chief of the Grand Council of the Crees The government has never explained what it means by veto Is a veto absolute If so then a veto isn t the same thing as consent In international law human rights are generally relative and not absolute The right to free prior and informed consent in the UN Declaration is not absolute Grand Chief Ed John First Nations Summit said In the recent decision recognizing Tsilhqot in title the Supreme Court itself rejected Canada s incomprehensible position In its unanimous decision recognizing Tsilhqot in ownership of a large part of their traditional lands the Supreme Court stated in June Governments and individuals proposing to use or exploit land whether before or after a declaration of Aboriginal title can avoid a charge of infringement or failure to adequately consult by

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/news/public-statements/joint-press-release/canada-uses-world-conference-to-continue-indefensible (2016-02-13)
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  • Syrian refugees start a new life in Norway through resettlement | Amnesty International Canada
    tells us what a huge difference moving to Norway has made in their lives The Norwegian authorities deliberately scheduled the call on Kahraman s first birthday remembers Sherihan a 29 year old musician They said We have a gift for you You can come to Norway We didn t know anything about Norway but we were so happy In a bright apartment in a modest 1950s building in a quiet corner of Oslo Norway she and her husband are teasing each other This is how I see Norway says Hennan an artist aged 31 Children come first then the woman then the dog and at last the man They both laugh Blood spattered pieces of bread The happy scene is a million miles away from what they left behinhd in Aleppo Syria Those days were hard says Hennan I saw a man being shot by snipers on the way from the bakery He was carrying a loaf of bread above his head to show that he was unarmed Around his dead body there were blood spattered pieces of bread I saw a woman gathering the pieces she probably had hungry children at home Most of my new sketches are sad Hennan adds because they re based on our experiences of war Hennan looks at some of his new sketches He had to leave all of his artwork behind when he fled his home in Aleppo Syria Amnesty International Barely surviving in Syria In Aleppo our life was simple says Sherihan We went to work made dinner and spent time with family or friends I played the flute at a music institute I had many dreams We were saving up to buy a nice car and big house a place to raise a child You know stuff that everyone wants I loved to be at home discussing politics with my friends or reading says Hennan I had around 700 books Some were illegal about religion or politics or in Kurdish a minority language banned in Syrian schools workplaces and books Our apartment was right on the border between the opposition and government areas One day someone shot and killed our neighbour just because they thought he supported Assad Syria s President We moved to the countryside continues Sherihan It was cold and there wasn t a lot to eat and no water or electricity I was pregnant by then We couldn t think about the future we only had the capacity to survive Their son Kahraman was born on 24 June 2013 Tough times in Turkey When Kahraman was a few months old we noticed that he wasn t responding well to our movements Sherihan continues A doctor told me he was blind and would be for his whole life I was devastated I decided to go back to Aleppo to get a second opinion It took 13 hours and I had to cross a street where snipers had shot and killed many people I took Kahraman in my arms and

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/syrian-refugees-start-new-life-norway-through-resettlement (2016-02-13)
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  • Trains to Nowhere – Hungary’s harsh welcome for refugees | Amnesty International Canada
    We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Trains to Nowhere Hungary s harsh welcome for refugees Tuesday September 8 2015 09 28 By Barbora Cernušáková Hungary Researcher at Amnesty International Bicske Hungary Follow Barbora on Twietter BCernusakova His brother just looked at him The Pakistani man in his fifties lay lifeless beside a train track a few hundred metres from Bicske train station It is unclear how he died but he was trying to find a better life in Europe Both men were part of a larger group running away from a train that had been halted since yesterday in the Hungarian train station Many other refugees and migrants are still refusing to leave the train because they don t want to go to Hungarian reception centres This week at the main Keleti station in Budapest and in Bicske I witnessed a new low in the cruelty of the treatment of refugees in Hungary Barbora Cernuscova Hungary Researcher at Amnesty International After being barred from boarding trains for days yesterday morning the police at Keleti suddenly lifted the barriers Hundreds of people rushed to a train decorated with silhouettes hugging and celebrating and a prominently featured German flag Many people desperate to leave Hungary after being stuck for days in dire conditions around the train station believed this train would take them to Germany where scenes of residents welcoming refugees have beamed around the world in recent days The carriages quickly filled and at about 11am the train departed But at Bicske around 30 km outside Budapest their journey came to an abrupt halt A Palestinian refugee from Syria who was on the train told me what happened The train stopped The police announced that we have to disembark otherwise they would use force So we complied opened the doors and started walking to the platform Outside the station there were buses The police were shouting and we saw smoke I decided to escape so I walked away and continued along the railways hoping I was heading in the direction of Austria But I was walking back to Budapest instead Eventually I gave up and took a taxi back to Keleti train station for 30 euros The retreat to Keleti must have been devastating for him as he knew only too well what awaited Crowds of people have been stuck waiting at the station for days even weeks on end They sleep on the hard floor covered by their clothes and blankets or sheltered by tents distributed by volunteers Nearby fast food chains have turned into the main providers of sanitation facilities Information on what will happen as well as what options and rights people have is scarce Hungary s government washes its hands of Keleti and the wider situation of refugees in the country They argue that the refugees don t want to stay there anyway But I don t blame the refugees for wanting

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/trains-to-nowhere-%E2%80%93-hungary%E2%80%99s-harsh-welcome-for-refugees (2016-02-13)
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