archive-ca.com » CA » A » AMNESTY.CA

Total: 947

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations | Amnesty International Canada
    Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Resource Development in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Resource Development in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Northern Gateway Pipeline debate Site C Dam Human Rights at Risk The Lubicon Cree Ongoing human rights violations Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects The Lubicon Cree Ongoing human rights violations The Lubicon Cree A case study in ongoing human rights violations the basic health and resistance to infection of community members has deteriorated dramatically The lack of running water and sanitary facilities in the community needed to replace the traditional systems of water and sanitary management is leading to the development of diseases associated with poverty and poor sanitary and health conditions Lubicon complaint upheld by the United Nations Human Rights Committee in 1990 Over the last three decades the province of Alberta has licensed more than 2600 oil and gas wells on the traditional territory of the Lubicon Cree That s more than five wells for every Lubicon person Territory that the Lubicon have relied on

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/the-lubicon-cree-ongoing-human-rights-violations (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Grassy Narrows | Amnesty International Canada
    Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Grassy Narrows Grassy Narrows the right to a healthy environment We have struggled for many years to save our way of life in the face of clear cut logging which has contaminated our waters and destroyed our lands We cannot go back to the old way of business where decisions were imposed on our people and our land with devastating consequences for our health and culture Grassy Narrows trapper Joseph Fobister The flooding of their lands The dumping of mercury into their waters And the large scale logging of their traditional hunting and trapping territories The people of Grassy Narrows an Anishnaabe community in northwest Ontario depend on the land as basis of their culture and as a continued vital source of foods and plant medicines But this relationship has been repeatedly threatened and undermined as a the result of government decisions made without their consent or even adequate consultation In 2002 community members

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada/grassy-narrows (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Protests and Policing: the legacy of Ipperwash | Amnesty International Canada
    Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash I saw police with handguns shot guns machine guns or something like machine guns all pointing right at us I said to my husband Oh my God what do we do now Rhonda Kunkel and her husband were arrested at gun point at the site of a land rights protest in the Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory when they arrived to ask about the safety of their son On September 6th 1995 an Ontario Provincial Police OPP sniper shot and fatally wounded an unarmed Indigenous man Dudley George after police moved to forcibly end a land rights protest at Ipperwash Provincial Park Fourteen years later the province returned the land at the heart of this dispute to the Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation In the meantime a landmark provincial inquiry was held into the factors leading to the confrontation between protestors and police and ways to prevent excessive use of force in the future During the Inquiry the OPP pointed to a policy framework that it had adopted after the killing of Dudley George The Framework for Police Preparedness for Aboriginal Critical Incidents states that during land rights protest the OPP will make every effort prior to understand the issues and to protect the rights of all involved parties and will promote and develop strategies that minimize the use of force to the fullest extent possible The Inquiry report endorsed the Framework

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada/protests-and-policing-the-legacy-of (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  • The Right to Water | Amnesty International Canada
    Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada Discrimination Against First Nations Children in Canada Resource Development in Canada Grassy Narrows Protests and Policing the legacy of Ipperwash The Right to Water No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects The Right to Water Canada The Right to Water in First Nations Communities Photo Arriving at the Shoal Lake 40 reserve by ferry The lake provides all the drinking water for the city of Winnipeg but the people of Shoal Lake 40 have been under a boil water advisory for 17 years because the federal government has failed to replace the community s inadequate water treatment system Joint message to the federal party leaders An estimated 20 000 First Nations people living on reserves across Canada have no access to running water or sewage In addition at any one time 110 to 130 First Nations are under boil water advisories because their municipal water is not safe to drink In 2006 an expert

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/indigenous-peoples-in-canada/the-right-to-water (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • No More Stolen Sisters | Amnesty International Canada
    More Stolen Sisters Justice for the missing and murdered Indigenous women of Canada Indigenous women are going missing and being murdered at a much higher rate than other women in Canada a rate so high it constitutes nothing less than a national human rights crisis Amnesty Mission to Upper Peace River Valley BC Every year women from Fort St John travel to Ottawa with a banner listing the missing and murdered women and girls in their community and every year the banner includes more names This is why Amnesty International is currently carrying out a Fact Finding mission to northeastern British Columbia from April 27 May 8 Follow our Researchers for updates News and Analysis Take Action December 8 What exactly is a National Inquiry MMIW OurInquiry November 25 New statistics on violence against Aboriginal people released November 24 MMIW New information about serial killers another reason why an inquiry is so urgent October 28 Civilian oversight needed in Val d Or investigation of Sûreté du Québec June 19 Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls every life should matter Apr 15 The need for accurate and comprehensive statistics on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls Mar 8 Federal government response to UN expert committee finding of grave human rights violations shockingly inadequate Mar 6 Human rights investigations highlight Canada s failure to meaningfully address violence against Indigenous women and girls Mar 1 What happened at the National Roundtable on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Feb 19 National roundtable on violence against Indigenous women time to renew calls for effective accountable and comprehension action Jan 12 Regional human rights body condemns Canada s failure to address crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women Nov 27 Ensure support for Indigenous women after sexual violence in the US Oct 1 Open letter to Canadian Parliamentarians from the head of the Amnesty global movement Sept 29 Ending violence against Aboriginal women and girls must be a priority for Canadians in election year Sept 24 Why do we need a National Action Plan on violence against women Sept 17 Frequently asked questions about violence against Indigenous women Sept 17 Missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls Understanding the numbers Sept 16 Public statement Latest federal action plan on violence against Indigenous women short on action Sept 12 Why is a National Public Inquiry on missing and murdered Indigenous women needed June 10 Open letter to Minister Peter MacKay May 16 New RCMP stats on violence against Indigenous women March 7 Parliamentary Committee report fails Aboriginal women and girls and all Canadians Sign our petition Collect petition signatures Attend an October 4 vigil Why are the rates of violence so high Racist and sexist stereotypes deny the dignity and worth of Indigenous women encouraging some men to feel they can get away with violent acts of hatred against them Decades of government policy have impoverished and broken apart Indigenous families and communities leaving many Indigenous women and girls extremely vulnerable to exploitation

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/campaigns/no-more-stolen-sisters (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples | Amnesty International Canada
    Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Home Our Work Issues Indigenous Peoples Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Indigenous Peoples in Canada No More Stolen Sisters The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Campaign for Colombia Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Implementation of the Declaration should be regarded as a political moral and legal imperative without qualification James Anaya UN Special rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous peoples The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples sets out minimum standards for the survival dignity and well being of Indigenous peoples around the world The Declaration builds on existing human rights standards many of which represent established legally binding obligations of states and applies these standards to the specific needs and circumstances of Indigenous peoples The Declaration provides guidance to governments a roadmap for non Indigenous peoples to better understand the rights of Indigenous peoples and a powerful tool to advocate for the rights of Indigenous peoples before courts and tribunals The United Nations adopted the Declaration on September 13 2007 after more than two decades of negotiations and deliberations in which Indigenous peoples from around the world participated as experts on their own rights The triumph of the Declaration s adoption was marred only by the actions of four prominent and wealthy Western states Australia New Zealand the United States and

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/indigenous-peoples/the-united-nations-declaration-on-the-rights-of-indigenous-people (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Refugees and Migrants | Amnesty International Canada
    do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Home Our Work Issues Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Refugee Protection in Canada The Rights of Migrants The Syrian Refugee Crisis Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Refugees and Migrants Photo Standing in front of a row of plastic tents a young boy flashes the V sign in a refugee camp on the border between Syria and Turkey near the northern city of Azaz on December 5 2012 ODD ANDERSEN AFP Getty Images Join our Facebook Group Regardless of their status in a country both regular and irregular migrants have human rights including the right to freedom from slavery and servitude freedom from arbitrary detention freedom from exploitation and forced labour the right to freedom of assembly the right to education for their children equal access to courts and rights at work Amnesty s research shows that both irregular and regular migrants face serious human rights violations Watch Video When you don t exist Amnesty International s campaign for the human rights of migrants refugees and asylum seekers in Europe and at its borders What s New Refugees Start New Life in Norway through Resettlement Blog November 2 Trains to Nowhere Hungary s Harsh Welcome to Refugees Blog September 8 Syria s Refugee Crisis in Numbers Blog September 8 Time for Europe to End the Refugee Shame Blog September 4 2015 Macedonia Thousands trapped and at risk of violence as border sealed 21 August 2015 Thousands of mainly Syrian Afghan and Iraqi refugees and asylum seekers are trapped and face a serious risk of violence after Macedonian authorities sealed the country s southern border on Thursday creating a new crisis zone amid the global refugee crisis News Release SOS Europe Asylum seekers relocation deal only a small step towards fixing a broken system 20 July 2015 The EU must immediately put in place more safe and legal routes for those in need of protection ease restrictions on freedom of movement of successful asylum seekers and significantly strengthen financial and operational assistance to frontline member states EU ministers are also set to discuss drawing up a possible list of safe countries of origin meaning that asylum seekers from those states would face restrictions on their right to apply for asylum The concept of a safe country of origin is both absurd and dangerous Media Advisory Balkans Refugees and migrants beaten by police left in legal limbo and failed by EU 7 July 2015 Thousands of refugees asylum seekers and migrants including children making dangerous journeys across the Balkans are suffering violent abuse and extortion at the hands

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/refugees-and-migrants (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Refugee Protection in Canada | Amnesty International Canada
    Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Refugees and Migrants Home Our Work Issues Refugees and Migrants Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Refugee Protection in Canada The Rights of Migrants The Syrian Refugee Crisis Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Refugee Protection in Canada Canada has been viewed as a global leader with respect to refugee protection It has signed the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees other human rights instruments which protect refugees Canada was the first country to set out guidelines for considering the refugee claims of women and has taken an active role globally in the resettlement of refugees through both government and private sponsorship programs In recent years however Canada like many other countries is creating more barriers for people seeking safety and security Amnesty International is concerned that the debate around asylum seekers and refugees in Canada is being framed by myths and misconceptions Government ministers frequently refer to asylum seekers and refugees as bogus and attempt to shape public attitudes with language which suggests refugees are criminals or otherwise breaking the rules Amnesty International continues to advocate for the rights of refugees in Canada and globally in order to ensure that governments live up to their human rights obligations to protect refugees and to ensure that refugees and migrants are treated fairly and with dignity hat s New UPDATES One Less Life in Limb o Luis Alberto Mata has been granted permanent resident status in Canada after more than 12 years May 25 2015 Luis Mata is a Convention Refugee who has been waiting more than 12 years to become a permanent resident in Canada Read more about Luis story here April 16 2015 Amnesty International welcomes Syrian refugee announcement but questions and concerns remain Press Release 7 January 2015 On December 1 2014 the Canadian government lifted the moratoria on removals to Haiti and Zimbabwe This means that Haitian and Zimbabwean nationals could face deportation if they do not

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/human-rights-for-refugees-and-migrants/refugee-protection-in-canada (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive