archive-ca.com » CA » A » AMNESTY.CA

Total: 947

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Stop Saudi Arabia’s oppressive anti-terror law | Amnesty International Canada
    Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Our Work Get Involved Donate About Us Stop Saudi Arabia s oppressive anti terror law Thursday November 8 2012 00 00 At a time when people throughout the Middle East and North Africa have been exercising their legitimate right to express dissent and call for change Saudi Arabian authorities have been seeking to squash this right for its citizens Philip Luther Amnesty International s Deputy Middle East and North Africa Director A draft anti terrorism law reviewed in June by Saudi Arabia s Shura Council a government appointed consultative body would offer a cloak of legality to long standing oppressive measures taken by the government in the pretext of countering terrorism The Draft Penal Law for Terrorism Crimes and Financing of Terrorism would allow the authorities to prosecute peaceful dissent as a terrorist crime Sentences are harsh and include the death penalty Questioning the integrity of the King or the Crown Prince would result in at least 10 years imprisonment The draft law allows for arbitrary detention denying detainees the right to be promptly brought before a judge and to be released or tried within a reasonable time It gives a specialized court the power to detain without charge or trial for up to a year and to extend such detention indefinitely Detainees are not given a means to challenge the lawfulness of their detention in front of a court The draft law also fails to include a clear prohibition of torture and other ill treatment No judicial review or oversight is included in the law The last nine months has seen a new wave of repression in Saudi Arabia as authorities have cracked down

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/get-involved/take-action-now/stop-saudi-arabia%E2%80%99s-oppressive-anti-terror-law (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Edward Snowden: “I should have come forward sooner.” | Amnesty International Canada
    4 2015 20 21 Two years since he first released documents revealing the extent of government spy networks NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden talked to us about how he and the political landscape have changed Check out the links below this interview for more information on mass surveillance two years after the Snowden reveelation and how you can take action What do you think has changed over the last two years People are much more sceptical of surveillance programs than they were before I came forward After looking through the information that has been revealed people have broadly confirmed that our governments have been breaking the law Even the courts which have every incentive to say nothing to see here move along To have been a part of that and to now have the opportunity to restore not just a measure of lawfulness to governments but a measure of liberty to our digital lives is something that gives me a reason to get out of bed in the morning What have people in the intelligence community said There are a lot of political incentives for people involved in intelligence to say the disclosures are extraordinarily damaging But in private a lot of them are very concerned about whether or not mass surveillance is right and whether or not we should be doing it at all Officials also think that the public awareness of mass surveillance is actually beneficial to them Because if you reveal to the world that you ve got the most incredible spy machine on the planet every other spy wants to talk to you and trade baseball cards with you I ve seen a lot of that Any regrets I have one regret I should have come forward sooner Had I done so I think we would have a much greater degree of liberty in our online lives Because the biggest challenge we face in reforming these surveillance programs is that once the money has been spent and once the practices have been institutionalized in secret without the public knowing it s very difficult to change them The government doesn t want to just uproot these systems and throw them away And spy chiefs have gotten used to the ability to go you know we don t even need to order surveillance on this person we already have all of their private records because we spy on everybody So let s just look through the last 30 years of their phone calls location records and border crossings It s very difficult to convince them to give that up What would you say to people who think I ve got nothing to hide so mass surveillance doesn t matter It s not about having nothing to hide it s about being you It s about being friends with who you want to be friends with without worrying about what it looks like on paper or inside some private record in some dark government vault It s about realising there

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/edward-snowden-%E2%80%9Ci-should-have-come-forward-sooner%E2%80%9D (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Does your country share data with the USA and its allies? | Amnesty International Canada
    Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Does your country share data with the USA and its allies Friday June 5 2015 14 06 Brought to you by Amnesty International and Privacy International On 5 June 2013 whistleblower Edward Snowden first exposed how governments are invading our privacy on a massive scale As a former analyst for the USA s National Security Agency NSA he showed the world how intelligence agencies are working together to spy on our emails web searches calls and so much more But that s not all The documents he leaked also revealed how governments are willingly sharing our personal data with the USA We ve learned that the NSA has secret pacts to share intelligence with at least 41 countries These private arrangements are almost totally hidden from view and attack the privacy of hundreds of millions of people Explore the map below to see whether your government is sharing data with the USA The Five Eyes alliance For 70 years the UK USA New Zealand Canada and Australia have formed an integrated global surveillance network exchanging intercepted communications with each other by default Europe Pact For 33 years the Five Eyes have co operated with this European club providing technology in return for access to their networks and exchanging some intercepted communications Special allies in the Asia Pacific region Across the region the Five Eyes are providing technology and assistance They may also be exchanging some intercepted communications but the arrangement is shrouded in secrecy Third

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/does-your-country-share-data-with-the-usa-and-its-allies (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 7 ways the world has changed thanks to Edward Snowden | Amnesty International Canada
    Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home 7 ways the world has changed thanks to Edward Snowden Thursday June 4 2015 20 30 On 5 June 2013 whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed the first shocking evidence of global mass surveillance programmes We ve since learned that the USA s National Security Agency NSA and the UK s Government Communications Headquarters GCHQ have been monitoring the internet and phone activity of hundreds of millions of people across the world Two years on we take a look at how the landscape has changed thanks to the documents Snowden released Read the full report Edward Snowden two years on 1 We know A LOT more about what governments are doing For example we know that companies including Facebook Google and Microsoft were forced to handover customer data under secret orders from the NSA And that the NSA recorded stored and analysed metadata relating to every single telephone call and text message transmitted in Mexico Kenya and the Philippines 2 There has been huge public opposition to government mass surveillance In our poll of 13 countries across every continent we found that 71 of people are strongly opposed to their governments spying on the internet and phone activity More than 450 organisations and experts across the world have signed up to necessary and proportionate principles on how to apply human rights to communications surveillance And more than 80 000 people have already signed Amnesty s global petition to ban mass surveillance 3 Judges have ruled aspects of these programs to be illegal In the UK the legal body that oversees the secret services declared aspects of the sharing of intercepted communications between the USA and the UK to have been unlawful before December 2014 And in the USA a court of appeal ruled in May 2015 that the bulk collection of US phone records was illegal 4 Technology companies and software engineers are building privacy into software Several major companies including Apple Google and Whatsapp have improved the default security and encryption provided to users Greater consumer pressure has pushed the industry to strengthen its approach to protecting users privacy 5 Global experts are speaking

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/7-ways-the-world-has-changed-thanks-to-edward-snowden (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • How technology helped us expose war crimes in Nigeria | Amnesty International Canada
    city of more than 500 000 people Confirming the location of an incident is a crucial step in the authentication process so finding this fact was highly relevant to reference the footage in a report we published on 31 March 2014 exposing war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by the Nigerian military and Boko Haram The report documented the killings carried out in January February and March 2014 by both Boko Haram and the Nigerian Security Forces It highlights 14 March as a tipping point when the security forces unleashed a brutal crackdown on former detainees On 14 March Boko Haram gunmen attacked the Giwa military barracks in Maiduguri Borno state They fought their way into the detention facilities and freed several hundred detainees Amnesty International has received credible evidence that as the military regained control more than 640 people mostly unarmed recaptured detainees were extrajudicially executed in various locations across Maiduguri Little did I know that this low quality 35 second clip was only the tip of the iceberg Over the next 14 months I reviewed close to 150 clips painting a shocking picture of how both Nigerian armed forces and Boko Haram commit atrocities on an ongoing basis It was at times a gut wrenching process that without a doubt left its mark on myself and others involved in this work I would be lying if I d claim to be a cool investigator that remains unaffected by this grim and often grisly content My hope though is that our findings will have a positive and lasting impact on the human rights situation in Nigeria The footage stemming from eyewitnesses and likely perpetrators captured mainly on cell phones and shared between individuals or on social media played a crucial role in the research released in our new report today However the significance of the accompanying authentication efforts goes beyond Nigeria Citizen media is revolutionizing human rights fact finding opening up new possibilities for investigations by human rights watchdogs and potentially also courts In order to realize this potential new methodologies and tools have to be developed The extensive experience with the footage from Nigeria also allowed me to develop a simple framework for reviewing citizen media for human rights investigations which I am confident will be replicable elsewhere Here s some insight into our work Authenticating amateur videos of atrocities The videos we have found predominantly show human rights violations by Nigerian military forces and an associated civilian militia the so called Civilian Joint Task Force Civilian JTF that uses machetes and other crude weaponry to go after perceived Boko Haram supporters In order to use the videos we had to first carefully review and authenticate them the risk of inaccuracies is enormous as can be witnessed by regular blunders in reporting While verifying citizen media often centres on confirming the date and location of an incident in human rights fact finding it is also important to interview eyewitnesses and identify specific violations and the responsible perpetrators

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/how-technology-helped-us-expose-war-crimes-in-nigeria (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 6 simple tools to protect your online privacy and help you fight back against mass surveillance | Amnesty International Canada
    information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home 6 simple tools to protect your online privacy and help you fight back against mass surveillance Wednesday May 20 2015 10 51 By Tanya O Carroll Adviser to Amnesty International s Technology and Human Rights Team As intelligence agencies hoover up more and more of our online communications we ve compiled a list of some simple apps and tools to help protect your privacy and make your calls emails texts and chats more secure Faced with the enormous power of agencies such as the NSA and GCHQ it can feel like there is little we can do to fight back However there are some great ways you can take control of your private communications online The six tools below which have been designed with security in mind are alternatives to the regular apps and software you use They can give you more confidence that your digital communications will stay private Note No tool or means of communication is 100 secure and there are many ways that governments are intercepting and collecting our communications If you re an activist or journalist you should use these tools as part of a comprehensive security plan rather than on their own Additionally this list is by no means comprehensive we recommend checking out Security in a Box from Tactical Technology Collective and Front Line Defenders and Surveillance Self Defense from the Electronic Frontier Foundation too 1 TextSecure for text messages TextSecure is an easy to use free app for Android iPhones have a compatible app called Signal It looks a lot like WhatsApp and encrypts your texts pictures video and audio files The app is open source and provides end to end encryption That means only you and the person you are sending to will be able to read the messages See below for an explanation of technical terms 2 Redphone for voice calls Redphone is another free open source app for Android for iPhones it s the same Signal app which combines voice calls and messaging which encrypts your voice calls end to end All calls are over the internet so you only pay for wifi or data rather than using your phone s credit 3 meet jit si for video calls and instant messaging meet jit si is a free and open source service to secure your voice calls video calls video conferences instant messages and file transfers It runs directly in your browser with no need to download anything and allows you to invite multiple people to join a video call It s a bit like Google hangouts but your calls and chats are encrypted end to end There is also a desktop version called Jitsi which you can download for Windows Linux Mac OS X and Android 4 miniLock for file sharing This free and

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/6-simple-tools-to-protect-your-online-privacy-and-help-you-fight-back-against-mass-surveillance (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The new Big Brother: Five shocking facts about France’s attempt to monitor your communications | Amnesty International Canada
    Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home The new Big Brother Five shocking facts about France s attempt to monitor your communications Monday May 4 2015 10 42 Photo Credit REUTERS Zoran Milich France is about to take one step closer to becoming a surveillance state with a new bill up for a first vote on May 5th dramatically expanding the government s power to spy on what people do online and offline The authorities claim the bill is needed to better prevent terrorism and any form of foreign interference and promote essential foreign policy interests However the overly generic definitions are likely to leave the door open to abuse Here are some of the things the French authorities will be able to do without first obtaining authorization from a judge Possibly intercept all your online communications French authorities could be able to secretly look at the emails people send the information they store in the cloud their confidential online records including medical appointments and the searches they do on engines such as Google See who you are in contact with The French authorities will be able to secretly hack computers and mobile devices and spy

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/the-new-big-brother-five-shocking-facts-about-france%E2%80%99s-attempt-to-monitor-your-communications (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 7 reasons why ‘I’ve got nothing to hide’ is the wrong response to mass surveillance | Amnesty International Canada
    launched UnfollowMe our campaign to end governments use of mass surveillance the Amnesty Facebook and Twitter feeds were swamped A lot of people told us If you ve got nothing to hide you ve got nothing to fear The reasoning goes that if you ve done nothing wrong it doesn t matter if governments want to collect all your data emails phone calls webcam images and internet searches because they won t find anything of interest It s an attractive argument but it s not right and here s why A lot has been written about this issue but for answers we looked through the responses of Amnesty supporters on Facebook We ve used your comments to explain why nothing to hide is the wrong way to respond to governments use of mass surveillance 1 Privacy should be a right unless something is done that arouses legitimate suspicion Karine Davison Usually governments conduct targeted surveillance when they monitor a person or group for specific legitimate reasons For this they ll need to get permission from a judge for example to monitor the internet use of someone they suspect of criminal activities If surveillance is indiscriminate our communications are being monitored without any reasonable suspicion that we might be doing something dodgy Governments are treating us all like criminal suspects and every detail of our personal lives as suspicious And there are few laws to control what they re doing 2 So no problem with a webcam in your bathroom or your bedroom either Ulf Carsson You may not think you care about your privacy but the chances are you probably do Every day we do things in our homes that we wouldn t do in public It s not because we have something to hide but just that there are parts of our lives we d rather keep private John Oliver host of US TV show Last Week Tonight asked people in New York how they felt about governments looking at their personal sexual pictures although he put it a little more crudely Unsurprisingly people feel less comfortable when they think of government agents looking at their most private images 3 BTW wanting my privacy is NOT equal to have something to hide James Earl Walsh Mass surveillance is an unprecedented intrusion into the privacy of ordinary people At no point in history have we accepted that governments should be able to monitor everything we do to keep us safe Imagine if we were told they wanted to install cameras in our living rooms or microphones under tables in coffee shops to ensure they could catch criminals This is the physical world equivalent of online mass surveillance It s a huge overreach of government power and we consent to it every time we say we have nothing to hide Instead we should say to governments I have nothing to hide and my private business is none of yours 4 Nothing to hide as long as you agree 100 with the

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/7-reasons-why-%E2%80%98i%E2%80%99ve-got-nothing-to-hide%E2%80%99-is-the-wrong-response-to-mass-surveillance (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive