archive-ca.com » CA » A » AMNESTY.CA

Total: 947

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Yorm Bopha set free in Cambodia | Amnesty International Canada
    Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Yorm Bopha set free in Cambodia November 26 2013 Yorm Bopha has been released from prison in Cambodia Just days after being reunited with her family and community she told to Amnesty International Thank you to Amnesty International s supporters Your campaign has been successful as my release shows But my case is not over yet Please keep pushing the Cambodian government to end the case against me And please keep supporting me my community and others in Cambodia We can achieve the most success when we all work together A 30 year old mother of one Yorm Bopha has been imprisoned since her arrest in September 2012 on accusations of planning an assault on two men She was convicted in December last year for intentional violence with aggravating circumstances despite no evidence against her and inconsistent witness testimonies Amnesty International designated Yorm Bopha a prisoner of conscience having determined that the real reason for her imprisonment was her human rights activism She had been defending her community s rights at the former Boeung Kak Lake in the capital Phnom Penh where thousands of people have been forcibly evicted since 2007 Amnesty International

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/good-news/yorm-bopha-set-free-in-cambodia (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • A historical Victory for Indigenous Community in Paraguay | Amnesty International Canada
    countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home A historical Victory for Indigenous Community in Paraguay April 25 2014 Mobilization Akye populations Axa and Sawhoyamaxa Paraguay AI On 24 April the plenary of the Paraguayan Senate voted on a bill to return 14 404 hectares of traditional land to the Sawhoyamaxa indigenous community The decision of the Senate is a major step forward to ensure compliance with the 2006 judgement of the Inter American Court of Human Rights The passing of the bill will allow the State to expropriate the land and to return it to the Sawhoyamaxa indigenous community by paying the landowner compensation After the Senate the bill will have to be discussed and approved by the Lower Chamber Cámara de Diputados and subsequently enacted promulgada by the President of Paraguay The Sawhoyamaxa indigenous community has been fighting for their traditional land for over 20 years and has celebrated this important decision The positive outcome achieved by the community in the Senate may be crucial to secure final approval of the bill 146 families have been fighting for more than 20 years to return to their land The Yakye Axa and Sawhoyamaxa belong to the Enxet ethnic group of Indigenous Peoples For years they have been forced to live in temporary homes because their

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/good-news/a-historical-victory-for-indigenous-community-in-paraguay (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Meriam Yehya Ibrahim Update | Amnesty International Canada
    Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home Meriam Yehya Ibrahim Update Friday June 27 2014 14 47 Meriam with her baby and family BREAKING NEWS 24 July 2014 Meriam Yehya Ibrahim and her family left Sudan and arrived in Italy earlier this morning Amnesty International continues to press the government of Sudan to change the laws so that no one ever has to endure this kind of ordeal again Under the weight of massive truly impressive worldwide pressure Sudan overturned Meriam Yehya Ibrahim s death sentence and released her from prison Over 1 000 000 Amnesty International supporters and members in Canada and worldwide spoke up for Meriam After being sentenced to 100 lashes and death by hanging after over four months in prison with her 20 month old son Martin and after giving birth to daughter Maya on a floor in shackles Meriam was released from prison and re united with her husband Daniel But this happy family re union turned sour very quickly Sudanese officials detained Meriam and her family at the airport as they were trying to leave Sudan Meriam has been charged with attempting to travel with false documents Meriam Daniel and their two children are now living in the US Embassy in Khartoum while these new charges are addressed Meriam may be out of prison but she is not yet truly free What an unimaginable ordeal this has been for Meriam What a testimony to her strength that she held firm to her beliefs despite the injustice

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/meriam-yehya-ibrahim-update (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  • Doctor Tun Aung | Amnesty International Canada
    Thein Sein Nay Pyi Taw Republic of the Union of Myanmar fax 011 216 71 744 721 Postage 1 85 Email via online contact form http www president office gov mm contact Please make a copy for His Excellency Hau Do Suan Ambassador for Myanmar 336 Island Park Drive Ottawa ON K1Y 0A7 Canada fax 613 232 6999 Postage 0 63 Background It was tense in the western Myanmar town of Maungdaw Rakhine State on 8 June 2012 Relations between the town s communities the Rakhine Buddhists and the Rohingya Muslims were deteriorating rapidly Each group suspected that the other group had killed some of their people The police expected violence so they called on a respected medical doctor in the community to help them keep peace His name is Dr Tun Aung Rioting did start and it was violent People present say that Dr Tun Aung actively tried to calm the crowd He tried to tell them that the government was setting up an investigation into the killing of the Muslims But the crowd of thousands mostly Rohingya Muslims was out of control and many were not prepared to listen When Rakhine pronounced ra hine Buddhists hurled threats at him he and his family felt nervous They accepted an offer of a drive home from an immigration official but instead the official took them to immigration headquarters Officials there released his family within hours but held Dr Tun Aung They were likely looking for someone to blame after the violence ended For several weeks no one knew where he was His family finally learned that he was in Rakhine state s Sittwe prison 170km from his hometown of Maungdaw The 65 year old grandfather is still there today The distance makes it very difficult for his family to travel

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/write-for-rights/cases/doctor-tun-aung (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • You have helped obtain protection for Flaminio Onogama Gutiérrez | Amnesty International Canada
    Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home You have helped obtain protection for Flaminio Onogama Gutiérrez Monday April 7 2014 13 17 Photo Credit Flaminio Onogama Gutiérrez a prominent Embera Indigenous leader in Colombia and former Counsellor with the National Indigenous Organization of Colombia ONIC where he was in charge of the human rights department Over 9 000 Amnesty supporters have spoken up about the grave danger facing Flaminio Onogama Gutiérrez following death threats and the assassination of two of his family members Your voice is being heard Colombian media reported that thousands of Canadians had called for protection of Flaminio and his community The Canadian government informed us it called on Colombian officials to provide protection for Flaminio and the people of La Esperanza The Canadian government also reported it had contacted the prosecutor s office to call for action to bring to justice those responsible for the threats and assassinations The government of Colombia provided Flaminio with a bodyguard and other protection measures Flaminio sent the following message A huge thank you to everyone Believe me your support is so important But Flaminio also

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/you-have-helped-obtain-protection-for-flaminio-onogama-guti%C3%A9rrez (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Letter to My Son By Eskinder Nega | Amnesty International Canada
    a handful and copious number of peoples are hypnotized into inaction Our collective dignity as the world s oldest black nation demands that this spell be broken irrevocably No myth has had wider resonance than the supposed gulf in history lifestyle psychology and hence politics between nations Indeed the measure of progress has trended at varying pace for disparate peoples But between antiquity and the 16th century when the first flicker of scientific revolution appeared with the works of Copernicus in astronomy the rift between the most advanced and the primal was inconsequential It took two more centuries until the invention of the steam engine in 1789 in Britain before science commenced to transform society Up to this time the structural gap between Europe the most advanced and Africa perhaps the least developed was no more dramatic than the cleavage between rural and urban Europe itself Only in the last 100 150 years was there a recognizable paradigm shift with rural Europe finally overtaken by the rise of cities No country save the British with their Magna Carta in 1215 and bill of rights in 1689 could claim centuries old evolution of democratic institutions The rest of the world plunged haphazardly and unceremoniously into an unexplored world of democratic reconfiguration The trail blazer revolutionary France in 1789 did not seek space for evolution to abscond from the bosom of one of Europe s most strident monarchy to the enduringly seminal rights of men men and citizen which enshrined not merely for France but for all humanity the principle of a government constrained by law No less significantly France and many parts of Western Europe were democratic well before a sizable middle class emerged The same holds for Britain The U S too was not only securely democratic in the early 19th century but was also a nation with an overwhelmingly rural citizenry But fast forward to the mid 20th century and democratic countries were still far from the norm It took a world war between 1939 and 1945 for democracy to reverse catastrophic slide and settle for an uneasy parity with ascending totalitarianism in Europe An additional four decades long cold war spanning 1945 to 1990 was needed to decide the winner convincingly Only then did democracy attain momentum Despite the popular convention mischievously amplified by most autocrats to deter demands for rights no people or country could plausibly claim an extended tradition of democracy Unless that is the last 200 years of humanity s 5 000 years of communal history is deemed as elongated And it seems Africa has finally moved to aptly realign with history The tempo is to boldly march the French way The result is breathtaking Over two decades the period between the collapse of Communisim in 1989 to the end of the first decade of the new millennium Africa was transfigured from a repository of fatuous dictators to a stronghold of more democracies than Asia the continent with the fastest growing middle class in history How Ethiopia lagged in this transformative saga of African renaissance and reformation accounts for my imprisonment cruelly and yet impersonally imperiling my prized duty as a father My parents brief matrimony was an early causalty of the intractable tension between tradition and modernity in post liberation Ethiopia Gruesome though the Italian occupation was in the late 1930s it tore down a smug culture of complacency The need to modernize to embrace the know how of the outside world was no more in doubt The ease with which the nation had fallen to fascist Italy was proof beyond reproach That my parents both hailing from profoundly conservative Orthodox families who traditionally equated modern education with Catholicism were allowed to attend school is testimony of how deep feelings run Modern Singapore s founding father Lee Kuan Yew idealizes by way of his still ongoing great marriage debate the kind of union my parents forged Highly intelligent both had won super competitive scholarships to do tertiary studies in American universities Father was in New Jersey at Rutgers University for six years Mother s tenure at the American University of Beirut the jewel of higher education in the Middle East was shorter having pursued post graduate studies for a year Both returned home full of energy with a plethora of bright ideas and a healthy dose of the sanguine optimism of the inexperienced Like many of htier contemporaries their rise was swift easy and assimilated in style Both were successful upwardly mobile and still hungry for more when they met The only predicament was in how they personally embraced modernity an allegory of the dilemma at the national level To his credit father did not yield to the sentiment which Lee Kuan Yew ruefully laments about the compulsion of educated young men to marry down In mother he met a remarkably rare Ethiopian woman financially independent educated emotionally secure as a single woman and no less ambitious than himself But unlike many of his peers he did not dive for cover He was in fact a persistent pursuer her repeated protestation notwithstanding She was not particularly wary of him rather she was circumspect of her odds in a primeval society But in the end I presume his charm and certainly family pressure inexorably prevailed A lavish wedding sealed the pact Unlike virtually all the women of her generation education had emancipated mother not only financially but crucially emotionally Reversal of either was unsavory to be fended off at any cost She was in a sense a feminist absent the creed There was little of the past she cared for To exemplify her feelings she started smoking though discretely Had he known her devoutly religious father would have simply died of grief Neither as far as I could discern did father He would have certainly balked at the prospect of a smoking wife Even if he had wanted to oblige her society his friends and kin would have censured him But every puff was an exhilarating expression of freedom for her Freedom not from want but the strictures imposed by tradition When she finally stopped after her divorce it was for my sake I was trying to emulate the only parent I knew And by this time she also had a more serious diversion to engage her energy the quest unprecedented in Ethiopia to prove that there can be a better life for a single woman after a divorce Her vindication came in little over five years by way of the most successful clinic in the country which she owned and managed Father awed and embarrassed could only watch from the sidelines A rebellious wife customarily returned to her husband chastened and humbled To all appearances father was the quintessential modern man He was moderately liberal he lived in the right neighborhood he dressed fashionably his English was faultless and until the rise of communism drove the latest cars And he had money But this was only the façade His acquiescence to modernity extended only slightly beyond these parameters The nucleus of the values he internalized from society which were in need of metamorphosis to complement his public image remained intact In this sense his profiles outlines the paradox that is the modern Ethiopian intellectual There is the fixation with the façade of modernity the technology the infrastructure the economy the lifestyl But there is also the corresponding resistance to its essential modus operandi a radically transformed worldview This means redefined relationships between husband and wife parents and children individual and society the state and its citizens To mother on the other hand most established values were anachronistic She had no compunction discarding them In their place a singular fixation with independence took hold Society was of course less than ready to accommodate her Though unexpressed her husband had expected blunting of the fiery spirit a gradual but inevitable acceptance of a place in life as a stay at home mom She thought otherwise Forsaking a secure and well paying job when females with jobs were a rarity for a precarious entrepreneurial venture was inexplicable Both departures from convention were broadly misread as expressions of aggressive disposition Few were able to see an indomitable spirit of individualism that make a modern society possible This discord between a cumbersome past and a future grappling to unfold is also at the core of our national dispute over democracy A coarse encounter between the novel and the archaic is as old as history itself The anecdotal evidence is rarely for the new to relinquish to the old After all women no w live in a far more liberate milieu than the yesteryears when few brave souls like mother were challenging convention Our modern politics has its genesis in a coup attempt in 1960 Though overwhelmed with relative ease it left a lasting imprint on history by precipitating the rise of a fiery student movement a precursor to the nation s major political parties Inspired by Egypt s much romanticized coup in 1952 which propelled young left leaning revolutionary officers to power Ethiopia s was the first shot by soldiers to seize state power in black Africa But while Egypt s was conscientiously planned and executed to eschew violence Ethiopia s was marred by wanton carnage Thus the debut of modern Ethiopian politics shadowed by unbridled violence Fifty years later the menace of brute force still lies at the heart of politics By the reckoning of the imperial government father like many of the intelligentsia harbored suspect reformist sentiments Though rewarded with high positions at an early age there was tension in his relationship with the government But it was tension devoid of danger for both sides For the government father and many of the young Turks as they were propitiously called by some posed no danger of subversion They were impatient for hasty reform from inside not calamitous revolution from outside Even if the young Turks had their way the result would be far less than catastrophic with some measure of discomfort they were tolerated And indeed no sedition was ever intended by the young Turks All they wanted was to upgrade not change the software This somewhat cozy but uneasy bond between government and intelligentsia was upstaged the day university students flooded the streets in support of the coup attempt In 1960 the year of the coup attempt Ethiopia s elite center of learning was cloistered in a lone university college A full fledged university had yet to be realized This was almost a generation after liberation from the Italians In about the same interval war ravaged Germany and Japan had not only reconstructed but were on the verge of crossing new economic frontiers Ethiopia s shortcoming was manifestly evident And finally a new generation scandalized by the inertia indolence stoicism and cynicism had risen It was palpably time for change The 1960s could be credibly dubbed as the decade of student movements But at its dawn students nurtured no greater ambition than to be part of the global post war economic boom The revered genre of the silent strong male which dominated the 1950s was still paramount By the mid 1960s Vietnam radicalized American youth primarily on its colleges and universities In France it was another war Algeria that was the impetus for campus militancy In Iran and Europe think he meant Ethiopia it was a coup successful in the case of the former a debacle in the latter The quartet gave the world the most animated students in history By the mid 1970s however the Americans and French had fizzled out The Ethiopians and Iranians peaked in the late 1970s and quietly faded into oblivion in the early 1980s But their fleeting existence notwithstanding they left behind powerful legacies The backlash against the counter culture contempt for authority and tradition the students triggered in the US made the seminal presidencies of Nixon and Reagan possible It took the coalition forged by Obama to win a second term to alter the dynamics of American politics At their peak Iranian students mesmerized the world by storming the US embassy in Tehran and humiliating a proud superpower In less than a decade and a half Ethiopian students inspired a nation to uproot a monarchy that had preserved for a millennium Though they were from four far flung continents had distinct histories and promoted radically different visions the students shared a common denominator disdain for the status quo To the Americans no one older than 30 was trustworthy As a way to unshackle tradition they attacked its prudish sexual mores The French were unduly agitated against their government and vented their anger on the streets of Paris with passion unseen since the storming of the Bastille After rejecting the modernizing pretensions of their foreign tainted monarch Iranian students yearned for the purity of a lost age To the Ethiopian students groomed by rote learning rather than critical thinking Marxism became the Holy Grail the panacea to all the nation s ills But a pivotal divide also separated them The Americans and the French lived in free societies There were adept political parties vibrant free press useful civic organizations multitude of professional and trade unions to channel grievances and represent interests None of these were about to be supplanted by students The Ethiopians and Iranians lived in tired monarchies There were no conduits for dissent Here was an opening for transformative impact Unlike the Japanese and the Chinese after the madness of the Cultural Revolution Ethiopian students never really made the crucial connection between the indigenization of science and development They saw national redemption primarily in the social sciences and many of the best students flocked to them in droves despite steady underperformance on standardized reading and comprehension tests To father and his generation the monarchy was sacrosanct Very few of them flirted with republicanism Their ideal was a British monarchy To the students who were embittered and abruptly radicalized by the events of 1960 the monarchy and the US which was implicated in the reversal of the coup attempt became loathed icons Embracing socialism seemed only logical and inevitable And here is where an academic culture chronically short on critical thinking was to have detrimental effect Whereas in the U S and France deep scholarly foundations mitigated against the swamping of the student majority by extremism in Ethiopia and Iran intellectual buffers against infantile radicalization were ominously absent But while Iranian students rallied around grassroot sentiments for religious chastity and nationalism only Ethiopian students militated against all things aboriniginal Nothing was sacred to them The emperor was lampooned Religion was rejected Culture was mocked Tradition was attacked History was disputed Ethnicity was politicized It was a tsunami at full thrust against all things established A good measure of excitement was the intriguing possibility of engineering society from scratch But rejection is virtually a carefree venture There is little strenuous intellectual effort involved The demanding undertaking lies in the pursuit and nourishment of an alternative consensus Ultimately this is where the students failed calamitously Singularly transfixed with rebellion and only perfunctorily with its aftermath they were governed by no moral codes were disciplined by no hierarchy and were direly lacking sense of proportion to temper emotions In this sense they had no analogue in the Americans or the French Nor indeed in the Iranians The Americans and the French were ultimately anchored by nationalism and ingrained identity The Iranians of course had religion Having rejected both nationalism and religion Ethiopian students had nothing durably satiating to replace them with This was the pristine environment in which militancy thrived Extremism thus became not a mere idiosyncrasy but rather the structural building block of the movement Tragically what the Ethiopians radicalized was really nothing more than nihilism The mania was to tear down an existing order In the end after the collapse of the imperial order only a small minority by now metamorphasized into armed insurgents had the energy to tread o The majority was too exhausted to continue opting for exile and a well earned rest in the West Of A multitude of vague memories from my distant childhood the sense of dread that permanently enveloped my grandmother s home where my mother and I lived intermittently after the divorce still lingers with me Years later in the 1990s I was to learn rather to my shock ours was only one of a handful of families in the neighborhood that mourned the fall of Haile Selassie the diminutive king who had held sway over the nation for over half a century Initially I thought it was loss of privilege that explained our anomalous But I know now there was more If one word was to render the spirit of the revolution it would certainly be equality An inordinate passion for equality suddenly bewitched the public what in theory could only have meant equality of opportunity was in practice subverted to imply equality of merit Not even the elderly the repository of wisdom in traditional thinking were to be deferred to anymore The nation s best and brightest whose income lifestyle and manners marked them from the majority became more subjects of derision than role models They were no more in vogue It was time to celebrate mediocrity to artificially elevate it to a higher podium This atmosphere endured with disastrous consequences for the entire reign of the military dictatorship the guardian of the revolution and still influences the present It is this pauperization of value that lies at the provenance o fthe national malaise that has numbed the intellectual elite To be fair many nations including the meritocratic U S where guilt ridden 2008 2012 presidential candidate Mitt Romney was bullied for his wealth occasionally toy with debased populism but rarely has it persisted with the kind of intensity evident in Ethiopia It was this slide to debauched populism that distressed grandmother s household It was a prescient reserve that anticipated

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/letter-to-my-son-by-eskinder-nega (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Omar Khadr thanks Amnesty International members for standing up for him | Amnesty International Canada
    so many good people in the world like the members of Amnesty International willing to stand up for other people Omar Khadr Edmonton Institution October 5 2013 From Afghanistan to Guantánamo Bay and now the outskirts of Edmonton Who would have thought that human rights campaigning that began with a short news report that a 15 year old Canadian had been arrested by US forces on the battlefield in Afghanistan in the summer of 2002 and continued through a decade of activism media interviews and legal work while that same young Canadian endured the lawlessness and injustices of Guantánamo Bay would now bring me to a maximum security prison outside Edmonton But that is where after eleven years of working on his case I recently travelled to meet and spend some time with Omar Khadr Just over a year ago Amnesty International enthusiastically welcomed the news that Omar Khadr who had been sentenced to an eight year prison term under an October 2010 Guantánamo Bay plea deal was at long last being transferred back to a Canadian prison It seemed peculiar to characterize a transfer from one prison to another prison as a human rights victory But that it was For leaving Guantánamo behind was one step closer to leaving more than a decade of human rights violations behind as well And thus we noted that return to Canada was not the end but more aptly a first significant step toward justice For much injustice remains As he returned he still faced six years now five of a prison term that had utterly refused to take account of his status as a child soldier when he was captured in 2002 and all of the important international human rights provisions providing protection to children propelled coerced and misled out onto the battlefield As he returned the Canadian government had still done nothing and still has done nothing to respond to the January 2010 Supreme Court of Canada ruling that found government officials had been complicit in human rights violations Omar had endured at Guantánamo for which there must be a remedy And as he returned there had been no independent investigation into the detailed and credible allegations he has made about torture and ill treatment at the hands of US officials in both Afghanistan and Guantánamo Bay I travelled to Guantánamo Bay three times in 2010 to observe the military commission trial against Omar Khadr Under the strict rules governing NGO s allowed on the base I was not allowed to speak with him or any of the prisoners I would have likely been sent packing on the next flight out if I had so much as said good morning while he sat no more than 10 metres from me in the courtroom So this was my first opportunity to have a long overdue conversation I obviously wanted to hear much from him and I did I also wanted to share with him the extent of Amnesty International s campaigning on

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/omar-khadr-thanks-amnesty-international-members-for-standing-up-for-him (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • al-Khawaja's wife speaks about her imprisoned husband | Amnesty International Canada
    our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Home al Khawaja s wife speaks about her imprisoned husband Wednesday June 26 2013 11 21 Khadija al Mousawi and her jailed husband Abdulhadi al Khawaja By Khadija al Mousawi wife of imprisoned human rights defender Abdulhadi al Khawaja Take action for human rights defender al Khawaja It was on a Friday when we gathered in my daughter Fatima s flat as a family eating together talking about politics and human rights or joking and laughing Suddenly we heard a very loud noise In a matter of seconds the flat door was broken in and burly masked men burst into the room I cannot explain how I felt at that moment because no word in the dictionary or in any language can explain it My husband had always said whenever they come to take me please do not interfere and I will just go with them But he was not allowed to go peacefully One of them grabbed him by the neck and then pulled him down the stairs by his legs He was brutally beaten punched and kicked in front of me and my daughters When my eldest daughter interfered they responded with insults and tried to arrest her too I was torn between begging them not to take her and looking at my husband on the stairs where they were still kicking him and praying that he was ok As if that was not enough I suddenly noticed three masked men holding my three sons in law by their necks and taking them downstairs At that point I was furious sad and helpless My husband was gone but I could not show how sad I felt because my daughters were suffering after watching the arrest of their husbands and father From that night on our lifestyle changed We would stay up all night just in case the masked men decided to come back and sleep after sunrise We always slept fully clothed just in case Every sound made me jump and check the apartment was safe Days went by and we were waiting for news any news We asked a lawyer to try to get any information about their condition or whereabouts He told us that that would be fruitless since lawyers weren t being told anything about detainees I was praying to God Please just keep them alive because after seeing how Abdulhadi was beaten I was not sure that he had survived My daughter decided to go on hunger strike She was getting weaker

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/blog/al-khawajas-wife-speaks-about-her-imprisoned-husband (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •