archive-ca.com » CA » A » AMNESTY.CA

Total: 947

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • France | Amnesty International Canada
    Rebellion in the Middle East and North Africa Libya Bahrain Yemen Egypt Tunisia Syria Iran Iraq Israel and Occupied Palestinian Territories Nigeria Ukraine Individuals at Risk Case Updates Huseyin Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Human Rights and the Arms Trade Home Our Work Issues Human Rights and the Arms Trade Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade What Amnesty Wants In An Effective Arms Trade Treaty 6 key points USA United Kingdom Russia Germany France Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects France Campaign for an Arms Trade Treaty France France Germany and UK are consistently ranked third fourth or fifth globally in terms of the value of their conventional arms exports Countries supplied France s key customers include Singapore UAE Greece other NATO partners the Middle East and North Africa region and Francophone countries Recently France and Russia have begun exchanges on defence cooperation and naval equipment

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/campaign-for-an-arms-trade-treaty/france (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Surveillance, Security and Human Rights | Amnesty International Canada
    Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Home Our Work Issues Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Mass Surveillance Security Legislation Guantanamo Bay Omar Khadr Canadians Detained Abroad Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Surveillance Security and Human Rights Security and Human Rights Overview Breaking news in Canada Troubling attacks on Parliament leave us saddened and shaken 22 October 2014 Perspective Security reform should protect our freedom op ed by Alex Neve Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada John Packer Director of the Human Rights Research and Education Centre at the University of Ottawa and Roch Tassé National Coordinator of the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group Bill C 51 The Anti Terrorism Act is the biggest overhaul of Canada s national security laws since 2001 Widely expanded powers and new criminal offences raise serious human rights concerns Laws intended to protect us from threats should not put our human rights at risk Join Amnesty s call to withdraw Bill C 51 National security reforms must meet Canada s human rights obligations Governments have not only the right but the responsibility to respond to concerns about threats and attacks including terrorism and protect their citizens But not at any cost Government actions must conform with international human rights law including protections against torture and arbitrary arrest and detention Acts of terror threaten our human rights They are human rights abuses But real security must ultimately be based on advancing the human rights of everyone We cannot pursue the security of some at the expense of others Our work on Security and Human Rights focuses on these areas Unlawful detention Many governments have responded to or exploited heightened concerns about terrorism before and after 9 11 by detaining people without the usual safeguards that are due to anyone deprived of their liberty This serious violation of human rights can result in people languishing in prison for years without trial and without being able to see the evidence against them with no way to challenge their detention Some cases involve secret detention or enforced disappearance where the

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/surveillance-security-and-human-rights (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mass Surveillance | Amnesty International Canada
    Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Surveillance Security and Human Rights Home Our Work Issues Surveillance Security and Human Rights Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Mass Surveillance Security Legislation Guantanamo Bay Omar Khadr Canadians Detained Abroad Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Mass Surveillance If you are on the internet or use a mobile phone odds are you are being followed by governments through wide sweeping mass surveillance programs This isn t just part of life in the 21st century it s illegal and a human rights violation Watch the video Amnesty International s UnfollowMe campaign calls on governments to ban mass surveillance and unlawful intelligence sharing All countries should have strong legal safeguards to protect people against unlawful interception of their communications and their private lives Every border you cross every purchase you make every call you dial every cell phone tower you pass friend you keep article you write site you visit is in the hands of a system whose reach is unlimited but whose safeguards are not Edward Snowden CITIZENFOUR In June 2013 Edward Snowden leaked thousands of classified National Security Agency NSA documents revealing the sweeping surveillance programs run by the NSA UK Government Communications Headquarters GCHQ and the Five Eyes spying and intelligence sharing agreements between the US UK Australia Canada and New Zealand These programs spy on most of the world s digital communications The Snowden revelations proved beyond a doubt that governments have systematically violated their citizens rights to privacy on a global scale and in turn placed other rights at risk Private data can be used to target journalists persecute activists profile and disciminate against minorties and crack down on free speech The chill effect is all too real when people know they are being

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/survelliance-security-and-human-rights/mass-surveillance (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  • Security Legislation | Amnesty International Canada
    Celil Raif Badawi Good News 2014 in Pictures 2015 in Pictures Projects Syrian refugees Global Campaign to Stop Torture Focus on priority countries China Illegal Detention and Torture Europe Human Rights Migration Control Bringing the Arms Trade Treaty into Force Strategic Arms Controls Working Against the Death Penalty Treatment of Prisoners Setting and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Surveillance Security and Human Rights Home Our Work Issues Surveillance Security and Human Rights Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Mass Surveillance Security Legislation Guantanamo Bay Omar Khadr Canadians Detained Abroad Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Security Legislation This page is Under Construction While you are waiting take a look at our latest action Bill C 51 The Anti Terrorism Act is the biggest overhaul of Canada s national security laws since 2001 Widely expanded powers and new criminal offences raise serious human rights concerns Laws intended to protect us from threats should not put our human rights at risk Join Amnesty s call to withdraw Bill C 51 National security reforms must meet Canada s human rights obligations SEVEN REASONS TO BE CONCERNED ABOUT BILL C 51 A vague definition of threats that could include a wide range of

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/survelliance-security-and-human-rights/security-legislation (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Guantanamo Bay | Amnesty International Canada
    they and other detainees have been subjected Human rights concerns in Guantánamo Bay remain an unfinished story How long before the US government closes the book on Guantánamo ends the use of unlawful detention in other facilities and meets its human rights obligations Read the latest update and take action Guantánamo hunger strikes Five steps the US government must take to end the injustice Guantánamo Timeline 2001 11 September Nearly 3 000 people are killed when four hijacked planes are crashed into the World Trade Center in New York the Pentagon and a field in Pennsylvania Amnesty International considers the attacks to constitute a crime against humanity 13 November President Bush issues a military order on the Detention Treatment and Trial of Certain Non Citizens in the War Against Terrorism ordering the Secretary of Defense to find an appropriate location to hold non US nationals in indefinite custody without charge The order seeks to prohibit any detainee held under it from seeking any remedy in any proceeding in any US foreign or international court If any detainee were to be tried the trial would be by military commission a body created by the executive not an independent or impartial ordinary court 28 December A memorandum from the Justice Department to the Pentagon claims that because Guantánamo Bay is not sovereign US territory the federal courts should not be able to consider habeas corpus petitions from enemy aliens detained at the base 2002 11 January The first detainees are transferred to Guantánamo from Afghanistan and are held in wire mesh cages in an area known as Camp X Ray 7 February President Bush signs a memorandum stating that no Taleban or al Qa ida detainee will qualify as a prisoner of war and that Article 3 common to the 1949 Geneva Conventions common Article 3 will not apply to them either Among other things Common Article 3 prohibits unfair trials torture cruelty and outrages upon personal dignity in particular humiliating and degrading treatment 1 August A memorandum from the Justice Department to then White House Counsel Alberto Gonzales claims that the President can authorize torture 4 and 10 December two Afghan detainees die in US custody in Bagram as a result of torture or other ill treatment 2003 3 July The Pentagon announces that President Bush has made six Guantánamo detainees eligible for trial by military commission Two of the six are subsequently released without charge or trial to the UK 2004 30 January The ICRC expresses its concern that the US authorities have placed the internees in Guantánamo beyond the law This means that after more than eighteen months of captivity the internees still have no idea about their fate and no means of recourse through any legal mechanism Through its visits the ICRC has been uniquely placed to witness the impact this uncertainty has had on the internees It has observed a worrying deterioration in the psychological health of a large number of them November A challenge brought on

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/security-and-human-rights/guantanamo-bay (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Omar Khadr | Amnesty International Canada
    and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Surveillance Security and Human Rights Home Our Work Issues Surveillance Security and Human Rights Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Mass Surveillance Security Legislation Guantanamo Bay Omar Khadr Canadians Detained Abroad Economic and Social Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Omar Khadr Omar Khadr left as a child in a photo provided by his family And right in custody in Guantanamo Bay in 2009 It has been over ten years since Canadian Omar Khadr was seriously injured and captured by US forces in firefight in Afghanistan on July 27 2002 He spent over ten years in US custody before finally being transferred to a Canadian prison at the end of September 2012 At 15 years old he never should have been on a battlefield in the first place Just months earlier the international community had struck a landmark agreement on child soldiers that prioritized demobilization and reintegration The United States however sent a number of children to the detention facilities at Guantánamo Bay including Omar Khadr Accused of throwing a grenade that ended the life of US Special Forces soldier Sgt Christopher Speer his trial by military commission ended in a plea agreement in October 2010 He was sentenced to eight more years in detention the first of which was to be served in US custody before he would be eligible for a possible transfer to Canada Diplomatic notes exchanged between the US and Canada at the time of the plea agreement stated that the Government of Canada is inclined to favourably consider Mr

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/security-and-human-rights/omar-khadr (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Canadians Detained Abroad | Amnesty International Canada
    of information from other governments where there are credible grounds for believing that it has been obtained under torture Similarly cease to share information with other governments where there are credible grounds to believe that it may result in the torture and or cruel inhumane or degrading treatment or punishment of detainees and other serious human rights violations Ensure that former detainees have equal access to civil remedies for human rights violations Independently and thoroughly investigate all credible allegations of wrong doing by Canadian officials and ensure criminal prosecutions or disciplinary measures as supported by the evidence Where there is credible evidence that a Canadian detained abroad has been involved in a criminal offence and is experiencing serious human rights violations such as torture and or unfair trial actively pursue the repatriation of that individual to face appropriate justice in Canada In cases where there is no legitimate basis for the person s detention actively pursue the immediate release and return of that individual to Canada Implement the recommendations of the Arar Commission both factual and policy phases and take such other steps as are necessary to address the findings of the Iacobucci Inquiry Current security related cases include Huseyin Celil China Huseyin Celil was sentenced to life imprisonment in China after an unfair trial in 2007 In the 1990s he suffered persecution and detention in China for his work advocating for the religious and political rights of the Uighur people He left China and eventually made his way to Turkey where he was recognized as a refugee by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees UNHCR Mr Celil was resettled to Canada in 2001 and beame a citizen in 2005 In March 2006 Mr Celil was arrested at the request of Chinese police in Uzbekistan where he and his family were visiting his wife s parents He was sent to China to face trial and was held in secrecy without access to a lawyer his family or Canadian officials He was subjected to threats that he would be disappeared or buried alive unless he signed a confession China refused to recognize Mr Celil s status as a Canadian citizen and Canadian officials were not allowed to attend the trial Omar Khadr Guantánamo It has been over ten years since Canadian Omar Khadr was seriously injured and captured by US forces in firefight in Afghanistan on July 27 2002 After a short stop in Bagram he has been in US custody in Guantánamo Bay ever since At 15 years old he never should have been on a battlefield in the first place Accused of throwing a grenade that ended the life of US Special Forces soldier Sgt Christopher Speer his trial by military commission ended in a plea agreement in October 2010 He was sentenced to eight more years in detention the first of which was to be served in US custody before he would be eligible for a possible transfer to Canada Despite an exchange of

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/security-and-human-rights/canadians-detained-abroad (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Economic and Social Rights | Amnesty International Canada
    and Upholding Standards Freedom of Expression and Assembly in Vietnam and Cambodia Individuals at Risk Focus on Asia Pacific Human Rights Defenders in the Americas North Korea Prison Camps Pakistan Attacks on Journalists Use of Blasphemy Laws Training and Capacity Building Get Involved Take Action Now Online Actions Petition Library Urgent Action Network Latest Urgent Actions Donate Come and join us Sign Up Be a Youth Activist 2015 Human Rights College for Youth Dance for Rights Human Rights College 2015 Planning Committee Member Application Lifesaver Actions for Young Activists Student Group Registration Form Youth Leadership Oppotunitities Join a group Community Activism Volunteer Leadership Fieldworkers Join our Membership Consultation Committee MCC Volunteers Wanted Nova Scotia University Orientation Week Country and Theme Coordinators in Canada The Board of Directors Resources for Activists Activism Fund Have your say Seasonal Activism Guide Meet our Team Work Volunteer Opportunities Donate Become a Monthly Donor Sign Up Online Your Donations at Work Amnesty Canvassers Telephone Canvassing Make a One time Donation Donate Online Leave a gift in your will Why we are remembering Amnesty in our wills Bequests RRIFs and RRSPs Life Insurance Contact our Planned Giving Associate Disclaimer Gifts of Stocks and Securities Give a Gift in Memoriam Send a Special Occasion Gift Raise Money for Human Rights Tips for Raising Money Fundraising Q As Donate a car Update your monthly donor information Join Us About Us What we do Key Facts about Amnesty International How We Make A Difference Our Leaders Our Impact Governance Financial Information Work With Us FAQ Members Thank You Contact Us Our Work Issues Home Our Work Issues Issues Torture Business and Human Rights International Justice Indigenous Peoples Refugees and Migrants Women s Human Rights LGBTI Rights Human Rights and the Arms Trade Surveillance Security and Human Rights Economic and Social Rights Maternal and Child Health Making Rights Law Housing is a Human Right The Millennium Development Goals and Human Rights Death Penalty Support Abolition Health and Human Rights International Human Rights Principles Campaigns Priority Countries Individuals at Risk Good News Projects Economic and Social Rights Economic and Social Rights Overcoming poverty is not a gesture of charity It is an act of justice It is the protection of a fundamental human right the right to dignity and a decent life Nelson Mandela Social and economic rights are concerned with basic human needs for food shelter water and for the means to provide those things for oneself We recognize that a person who is starving who is homeless who does not have the means to provide for their own basic needs cannot realize any other human right We demand dignity for all Amnesty is working to ensure that everyone has access to safe and adequate housing regardless of who they are or where they live Our members have mobilized globally to stop governments from evicting people from their housing without notice and without providing any alternative shelter Amnesty is also calling on governments everywhere to recognize water as a fundamental

    Original URL path: http://www.amnesty.ca/our-work/issues/economic-and-social-rights (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive



  •