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  • Clueless but contented: Canadians and water
    secrets We cover a range of water issues in the poll and ask about shameful water behaviours like Who takes the longest showers What water wasting behaviours are the most irritating Who is most embarrassed to order tap water in restaurants How many people take an extra long shower just to relax The answers young people 18 34 when people water down their driveway in the summer young Torontonians and 21 of all Canadians Love that driveway Some of the questions in our poll might look oddball on the surface but our more serious ones actually expose some deeper rooted misconceptions about water in Canada For example one of the biggest sources of water pollution in urbanized areas is when storm water runs off hard impermeable surfaces like roads parking lots buildings and driveways Turns out that almost half of Canadians prefer a paved impermeable driveway rather than grass or permeable paving stones This makes sense in Canada I suppose given it s probably easier to shovel snow from an evenly paved surface than from cobble stones I live in a condo so what do I know But even after hearing that permeable surfaces reduce the negative implications of storm water runoff 53 of the paved driveway lovers said they wouldn t part with their pavement That number increases significantly among men over 55 go figure Municipal Infrastructure We hope our annual poll provides useful information to those who are responsible for maintaining our municipal water systems and incidentally 84 of Canadians think their municipality is doing a good job of providing good quality water Here s a finding that surprised us A whopping 78 of Canadians think that their local water infrastructure is in good condition needing only minor investment for upkeep That may not be a surprising statistic but it s a real head scratcher when you consider that four out of ten 42 confess that they re actually not very aware of the condition of the water and sewage infrastructure serving their home So what exactly are they basing their opinions on one has to wonder And given this how hard will it be for municipalities to defend and pay for the estimated 80 billion required to replace drinking water wastewater and storm water infrastructure that s been identified by municipalities themselves as less than good For more on this visit Canada as the Water Solutions Country Defining the Opportunities 2 In many municipalities water distribution and sewage pipes can be up to 80 years old and have already reached the end of their service life Yet investments in water infrastructure maintenance are chronically underfunded and often deferred even in the best of economic times falling victim to the no new taxes environment that is so much a part of today s political landscape Cost of water Our study also showed that Canadians at least those on municipal water systems don t really have a sense of the true value of water This is no surprise Of

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/print/195 (2014-10-09)
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  • Blue Economy Initiative | HEALTHY WATERS, A PROSPEROUS FUTURE
    America Monterrey Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Montevideo Thursday October 9 2014 02 54 0200 America Montreal Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Montserrat Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Nassau Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America New York Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Nipigon Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Nome Wednesday October 8 2014 20 54 0800 America Noronha Thursday October 9 2014 02 54 0200 America North Dakota Beulah Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America North Dakota Center Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America North Dakota New Salem Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Ojinaga Wednesday October 8 2014 22 54 0600 America Panama Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Pangnirtung Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Paramaribo Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 America Phoenix Wednesday October 8 2014 21 54 0700 America Port of Spain Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Port au Prince Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Porto Velho Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Puerto Rico Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Rainy River Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Rankin Inlet Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Recife Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 America Regina Wednesday October 8 2014 22 54 0600 America Resolute Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Rio Branco Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Santa Isabel Wednesday October 8 2014 21 54 0700 America Santarem Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 America Santiago Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 America Santo Domingo Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Sao Paulo Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 America Scoresbysund Thursday October 9 2014 04 54 0000 America Shiprock Wednesday October 8 2014 22 54 0600 America Sitka Wednesday October 8 2014 20 54 0800 America St Barthelemy Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America St Johns Thursday October 9 2014 02 24 0230 America St Kitts Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America St Lucia Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America St Thomas Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America St Vincent Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Swift Current Wednesday October 8 2014 22 54 0600 America Tegucigalpa Wednesday October 8 2014 22 54 0600 America Thule Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 America Thunder Bay Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Tijuana Wednesday October 8 2014 21 54 0700 America Toronto Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Tortola Thursday October 9 2014 00 54 0400 America Vancouver Wednesday October 8 2014 21 54 0700 America Whitehorse Wednesday October 8 2014 21 54 0700 America Winnipeg Wednesday October 8 2014 23 54 0500 America Yakutat Wednesday October 8 2014 20 54 0800 America Yellowknife Wednesday October 8 2014 22 54 0600 Antarctica Casey Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Antarctica Davis Thursday October 9 2014 11 54 0700 Antarctica DumontDUrville Thursday October 9 2014 14 54 1000 Antarctica Macquarie Thursday October 9 2014 15 54 1100 Antarctica Mawson Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Antarctica McMurdo Thursday October 9 2014 17 54 1300 Antarctica Palmer Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 Antarctica Rothera Thursday October 9 2014 01 54 0300 Antarctica South Pole Thursday October 9 2014 17 54 1300 Antarctica Syowa Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Antarctica Vostok Thursday October 9 2014 10 54 0600 Arctic Longyearbyen Thursday October 9 2014 06 54 0200 Asia Aden Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Asia Almaty Thursday October 9 2014 10 54 0600 Asia Amman Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Asia Anadyr Thursday October 9 2014 16 54 1200 Asia Aqtau Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Asia Aqtobe Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Asia Ashgabat Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Asia Baghdad Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Asia Bahrain Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Asia Baku Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Asia Bangkok Thursday October 9 2014 11 54 0700 Asia Beirut Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Asia Bishkek Thursday October 9 2014 10 54 0600 Asia Brunei Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Choibalsan Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Chongqing Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Colombo Thursday October 9 2014 10 24 0530 Asia Damascus Thursday October 9 2014 07 54 0300 Asia Dhaka Thursday October 9 2014 10 54 0600 Asia Dili Thursday October 9 2014 13 54 0900 Asia Dubai Thursday October 9 2014 08 54 0400 Asia Dushanbe Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Asia Gaza Thursday October 9 2014 06 54 0200 Asia Harbin Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Hebron Thursday October 9 2014 06 54 0200 Asia Ho Chi Minh Thursday October 9 2014 11 54 0700 Asia Hong Kong Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Hovd Thursday October 9 2014 11 54 0700 Asia Irkutsk Thursday October 9 2014 13 54 0900 Asia Jakarta Thursday October 9 2014 11 54 0700 Asia Jayapura Thursday October 9 2014 13 54 0900 Asia Jerusalem Thursday October 9 2014 06 54 0200 Asia Kabul Thursday October 9 2014 09 24 0430 Asia Kamchatka Thursday October 9 2014 16 54 1200 Asia Karachi Thursday October 9 2014 09 54 0500 Asia Kashgar Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Kathmandu Thursday October 9 2014 10 39 0545 Asia Khandyga Thursday October 9 2014 14 54 1000 Asia Kolkata Thursday October 9 2014 10 24 0530 Asia Krasnoyarsk Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Kuala Lumpur Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Kuching Thursday October 9 2014 12 54 0800 Asia Kuwait Thursday October

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/user/login?destination=comment/reply/195%23comment-form (2014-10-09)
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  • How Blue is Your Bottom Line? | Blue Economy Initiative
    May 28 2010 previous 2 of 2 News Multimedia Other Related News How Blue is Your Bottom Line PRINT University of Toronto August 28 2012 Workshop September 18 and 19 2012 Join Nicholas Parker Chair of the Blue Economy Initiative the morning of September 19th in a panel discussion The Radical Rethink How should water be managed in the future facilitated by Kerry Freek of Water Canada This panel is part of a two day workshop How Blue is Your Bottom Line to take place on September 18 19th 2012 The course is hosted by the University of Toronto s School of the Environment in partnership with Water Canada Magazine and Tangerine Tango with support from Corporate Knights and GTAA Partners in Project Green Click here for workshop agenda Description Growing water demand is a critical business security and environmental issue Increased energy production consumes significant amounts of a most precious resource In turn the provision of water consumes more energy a perpetual cycle of costs that can be controlled by changing the direction of your business When businesses policy makers and influencers make wiser longer term decisions about their interaction with water the problem of water scarcity can be

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/othernews/how-blue-your-bottom-line?page=1 (2014-10-09)
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  • How Blue is Your Bottom Line?
    Canada This panel is part of a two day workshop How Blue is Your Bottom Line to take place on September 18 19th 2012 The course is hosted by the University of Toronto s School of the Environment in partnership with Water Canada Magazine and Tangerine Tango with support from Corporate Knights and GTAA Partners in Project Green Click here for workshop agenda 1 Description Growing water demand is a critical business security and environmental issue Increased energy production consumes significant amounts of a most precious resource In turn the provision of water consumes more energy a perpetual cycle of costs that can be controlled by changing the direction of your business When businesses policy makers and influencers make wiser longer term decisions about their interaction with water the problem of water scarcity can be turned into water opportunities In this two day course at the University of Toronto you will learn how water affects your business bottom line and how the business risks can be mitigated You will be provided with tools to develop opportunities associated with water scarcity and learn how to build a proactive and engaging water strategy for your organization Corporate leaders policy makers and public

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/print/155 (2014-10-09)
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  • UN 'Water for Life' Best Water Management Practices Award | Blue Economy Initiative
    our water June 10 2010 Albertans have lost interest in public dialogue about water May 28 2010 previous 2 of 2 News Multimedia Other Related News UN Water for Life Best Water Management Practices Award PRINT UN Water August 24 2012 The United Nations Office to Support the International Decade for Action Water for Life 2005 2015 UN Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication UNW DPAC and the UN World Water Assessment Programme WWAP have announced the 3rd edition of the Water for Life UN Water Best Practices Award on behalf of UN Water The purpose of the Award is to promote efforts to fulfil international commitments made on water and water related issues by 2015 through recognition of outstanding best practices that can ensure the long term sustainable management of water resources and contribute to the achievement of internationally agreed goals and targets contained in the Millennium Development Goals MDGs Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation The Award is open to projects or programmes achieving particularly effective results in the field of water management or in raising awareness in water issues The prize is awarded yearly in two categories one in best water management practices and

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/othernews/un-water-life-best-water-management-practices-award?page=1 (2014-10-09)
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  • UN 'Water for Life' Best Water Management Practices Award
    Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication UNW DPAC and the UN World Water Assessment Programme WWAP have announced the 3rd edition of the Water for Life UN Water Best Practices Award on behalf of UN Water The purpose of the Award is to promote efforts to fulfil international commitments made on water and water related issues by 2015 through recognition of outstanding best practices that can ensure the long term sustainable management of water resources and contribute to the achievement of internationally agreed goals and targets contained in the Millennium Development Goals MDGs Agenda 21 and the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation The Award is open to projects or programmes achieving particularly effective results in the field of water management or in raising awareness in water issues The prize is awarded yearly in two categories one in best water management practices and another one in best participatory communication awareness raising and education practices This edition s focus is on Water Cooperation 1 as 2013 is International Year of Water Cooperation and World Water Day 2013 is also dedicated to this important theme The award statutes 2 describe application requirements The application period is open from 30 June to 15 September

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/print/152 (2014-10-09)
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  • Other related news | Blue Economy Initiative
    could leave large numbers of people facing severe water stress and the threats of drought and floods to food production and it s clear water is the most serious challenge we face We can substitute batteries for oil in automobiles but there is no substitute for water So we face a water stressed world Need however equals opportunity The challenge is for Canada to contribute to water strategies and help the world meet the global water challenge How do we utilize our strengths the excellence of our engineering and technical graduates our proven academic research capabilities and our innovative companies that can deliver water goods and services to build up a strong water sector to generate new jobs and competitive companies while helping to meet the overarching global challenge Steps for a world water strategy First Canadians need to raise the level of understanding not only among policymakers but also among the wider public that there is an enormous challenge facing the world and that there is also a significant opportunity for Canada by strengthening our research base and the strength of our companies This is the first great challenge to identify our water champions who will provide the leadership to make Canada a water solutions country These champions must come not only from academia and our clean water companies but also from the user community our municipalities and businesses that need a safe and reliable water supply Water users have a significant stake in a solutions strategy There is the risk of complacency due to a widespread public assumption that Canada s abundant water supply means we don t face water challenges Yet Canada itself faces challenges to improve water quality and sanitation performance meet the threats of droughts and floods in agricultural lands ensure the efficient and sustainable use of water in energy and mining industries meet the water needs of First Nations and improve water efficiency and conservation technologies and practices in the economy and society Meeting domestic challenges through innovative solutions will strengthen the research base and the capabilities and competitiveness of Canadian water companies This means efforts to balance federal and provincial budgets must not come at the expense of research or improvements in water infrastructure Cutting these investments would mean a weaker future Canadian economy Research and infrastructure spending are investments in a more secure and sustainable future Ensuring water quality standards stretch water users including municipal water and wastewater systems and water intensive industries to meet world leading standards is another effective way to drive innovation and develop new skills Leading edge water quality and efficiency standards and full cost pricing would create a market for innovative water solutions It is important that the water user community be an early adopter of new technologies and practices Major engineering companies can play a big role providing opportunities to demonstrate and market new technologies Another challenge needs to be addressed How do we grow more small companies into mid size or large companies Canada is

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/othernews?page=1 (2014-10-09)
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  • To Market We Go
    are rare but not new in Canada In fact one of the most successful and globally recognized programs originates with South Nation Conservation 2 SNC a watershed based organization in eastern Ontario The South Nation River watershed supports farming along with regular municipal water usage and at times the watershed has exceeded the provincial water quality objective for phosphorus in some cases rising to over four times the limit In response SNC developed and implemented a water quality trading program called Total Phosphorus Management TPM as part of its Clean Water Program 3 TPM allows dischargers to release excess phosphorus into the waterways as long as they offset the increased load by helping to control phosphorus from non point sources such as agricultural runoff Agreements with SNC stipulate that dischargers will pay a specific amount of money in exchange for credits The Clean Water Program awards those funds to projects designed to prevent phosphorus from entering the watercourse such as barnyard runoff control Reducing the overall load to the treatment plants protects the watershed and the program achieves environmental economic and social benefits According to Environment Canada cost benefit studies conducted in the watershed estimate that the cost of removing phosphorus through the TPM program is 1 200 per kilogram compared to 2 000 per kilogram for traditional wastewater treatment methods The TPM has leveraged over 100 000 since the year 2000 for the Clean Water Program to implement phosphorus reduction projects which have stimulated economic development in many sectors including consulting permitting construction labour and equipment and materials Movement and pick up Ontario s Regional Municipality of York is also considering phosphorus offsets Due to the Lake Simcoe Protection Act 4 and associated Phosphorus Reduction Strategy 5 there are limits placed on each of the 15 sewage treatment plants around the lake If you have population growth you have more phosphorus says Adrian Coombs s enior project manager for the Region s Upper York Sewage Solution UYSS project a treatment plant aimed at accommodating expected growth in the area Coombs says her team is looking at several options for offsets including removing septic tanks from within 100 metres of a watercourse or rebuilding or retrofitting stormwater management ponds built in the mid 1990s It s up to the Ministry of Environment MOE to set the ratio she says If you re discharging one kilogram above your limit into a watercourse you might have to take two away for example Project specific offsets are a highly appropriate way to combat loads in excess of rated capacity says Coombs but they re probably a short term solution Large phosphorus loads should ultimately be prevented from entering the watershed It s a matter of how you protect the lake she says Broader water quality trading however may allow dischargers to acquire credits that aren t necessarily in the same watershed That s part of what the MOE is considering around trading in addition to questions about governance and brokering Level up In

    Original URL path: http://blue-economy.ca/print/154 (2014-10-09)
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