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  • What is cervical cancer? - Canadian Cancer Society
    Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Cervical cancer Recently viewed pages Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Bladder Bladder cancer For media Research Institute Careers Contact us Terms and conditions Linking policy Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Cervical Cervical cancer Cervical cancer Malignant tumours Precancerous conditions Benign tumours Risks Screening Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Grading Staging If cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Treatment Supportive care Research Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary We ve gained new knowledge about lung cancer and it s making a difference Read Dr Ming Sound Tsao s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Support from someone who has been there The Canadian Cancer Society s peer support program is a telephone support service that matches cancer patients and their caregivers with specially trained volunteers Learn More What is cervical cancer Cervical cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in the cells of the cervix Malignant means that it can spread or metastasize to other parts of the body The cervix is part of a woman s reproductive system It is the narrow lower part of the uterus or womb It is the passageway that connects the uterus to the vagina Cells in the cervix sometimes change and no longer grow or behave normally These changes may lead to benign tumours such as polyps or fibroids which are not cancer When cells of the cervix start to change and become abnormal it is called dysplasia of

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/cervical/cervical-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is colorectal cancer? - Canadian Cancer Society
    near you Relay For Life Daffodil Ball Daffodil Month Cops for Cancer Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Colorectal cancer Recently viewed pages Colorectal Colorectal cancer Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Bladder Bladder cancer For media Research Institute Careers Contact us Terms and conditions Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Colorectal Colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer Malignant tumours Precancerous conditions Benign tumours Risks Screening Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Grading Staging If cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Treatment Supportive care Research Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary I m lucky I can spend more time with my grandchildren thanks to the Society and its volunteers Read Louise s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Access to services in your community The Canadian Cancer Society s Community Services Locator helps cancer patients and their families find the services and programs they need in their community Learn More What is colorectal cancer Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in cells of the colon or rectum Malignant means that it can spread or metastasize to other parts of the body The colon and rectum are part of the digestive system Together the colon and rectum make up the large intestine or large bowel The colon takes up water and nutrients from food and passes waste to the rectum Cells in the colon or rectum sometimes change and no

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/colorectal/colorectal-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is kidney cancer? - Canadian Cancer Society
    Month Cops for Cancer Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Kidney cancer Recently viewed pages Kidney Kidney cancer Colorectal Colorectal cancer Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Bladder Bladder cancer For media Research Institute Careers Contact us Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Kidney Kidney cancer Kidney cancer Malignant tumours Benign tumours Benign conditions Risks Finding cancer early Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Grading Staging If cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Treatment Supportive care Research Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary Recurrence is always at the back of your mind With the study they ll follow me for 10 years and that s reassuring Read Elizabeth s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More What is kidney cancer Kidney cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in the cells of the kidney Malignant means that it can spread or metastasize to other parts of the body The kidney is part of the urinary system The 2 kidneys are on either side of the backbone deep inside the upper part of the abdomen On the top of each kidney is an adrenal gland The kidneys make urine by filtering water and waste material from the blood

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/kidney/kidney-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is leukemia? - Canadian Cancer Society
    to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Leukemia Recently viewed pages Leukemia Leukemia Kidney Kidney cancer Colorectal Colorectal cancer Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Bladder Bladder cancer For media Research Institute Careers Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Leukemia Leukemia Leukemia ALL AML CLL CML Rare lymphocytic leukemias Hairy cell leukemia Polycythemia vera Idiopathic myelofibrosis Essential thrombocythemia Myelodysplastic syndromes Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia Atypical chronic myelogneous leukemia Myelodysplastic myeloproliferative disease unclassifiable Risks Finding cancer early Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Supportive care Research Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary There aren t many positive aspects of metastatic cancer but I hope that by providing empathy and being a caring listener I can be of some help to others Read Marlene s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team The Society has produced and distributed 1 4 million print materials about all aspects of cancer Learn More What is leukemia Leukemia is a cancer that starts in blood stem cells Stem cells are basic cells that develop into different types of cells that have different jobs Blood stem cells develop into either lymphoid stem cells or myeloid stem cells Lymphoid stem cells develop into lymphocytes a type of white blood cell Lymphocytes make antibodies to help fight infection Myeloid stem cells develop into red blood cells granulocytes monocytes or platelets Red blood cells carry oxygen to all tissues of the body Granulocytes and monocytes are types of white blood cells that destroy bacteria and help fight infection Platelets

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia/leukemia/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is childhood leukemia? - Canadian Cancer Society
    volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Childhood leukemia Recently viewed pages Leukemia childhood Childhood leukemia Leukemia Leukemia Kidney Kidney cancer Colorectal Colorectal cancer Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Bladder Bladder cancer For media Research Institute Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Leukemia childhood Childhood leukemia Childhood leukemia Types of leukemia Risks Finding cancer early Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Staging Disease progression Prognosis and survival Treatment Supportive care Research Clinical trials Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary Volunteering requires time energy and dedication It s a big job but it s worth it Read Janet s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team 71 million was invested in the Society s programs services and information for people with cancer and their caregivers Learn More What is childhood leukemia Leukemia is a cancer that starts in blood stem cells Stem cells are basic cells that develop into different types of cells that have different jobs Blood stem cells develop into either lymphoid stem cells or myeloid stem cells Lymphoid stem cells develop into lymphocytes a type of white blood cell Lymphocytes make antibodies to help fight infection Myeloid stem cells develop into red blood cells granulocytes monocytes or platelets Red blood cells carry oxygen to all tissues of the body Granulocytes and monocytes are types of white blood cells that destroy bacteria and help fight infection Platelets form clots in damaged blood vessels to stop bleeding Leukemia develops when the blood stem cells in the bone marrow change

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia-childhood/childhood-leukemia/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is lung cancer? - Canadian Cancer Society
    Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Lung cancer Recently viewed pages Lung Lung cancer Leukemia childhood Childhood leukemia Leukemia Leukemia Kidney Kidney cancer Colorectal Colorectal cancer Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Bladder Bladder cancer For media Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Lung Lung cancer Lung cancer Non small cell lung cancer Small cell lung cancer Lung metastases Benign tumours Risks Finding cancer early Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Grading Staging If cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Treatment Supportive care Research Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary Volunteering during Daffodil Month is an incredibly rewarding experience whether you have been touched by cancer or not Read Paul s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Clinical trial discovery improves quality of life A clinical trial led by the Society s NCIC Clinical Trials group found that men with prostate cancer who are treated with intermittent courses of hormone therapy live as long as those receiving continuous therapy Learn More What is lung cancer Lung cancer is a malignant tumour that starts in the cells of the lung Malignant means that it can spread or metastasize to other parts of the body When cancer starts in lung cells it is called primary lung cancer The lung is part of the respiratory system You use your lungs when you breathe The lungs are in the chest one on each side of the heart The right lung has 3 main parts called lobes The left lung is a bit smaller and has 2 lobes The lungs are cushioned and protected by a thin covering called the pleura Cells in the lung sometimes change and no longer grow or behave normally These changes may lead to benign tumours such as hamartoma and papilloma Benign tumours are not cancerous But in some cases changes to lung cells can cause cancer Lung cancers are divided into non small cell lung cancer NSCLC and small cell lung cancer SCLC based on the type of cell in which the cancer started Non small cell lung cancer usually starts in glandular cells on the outer part of the lung This type of cancer is called adenocarcinoma Non small cell lung cancer can also start in flat thin cells called squamous cells These cells line the bronchi which are the large tubes or airways that branch off from the trachea or windpipe into the lungs This type of cancer is called squamous cell carcinoma of the lung Large cell carcinoma is another type of non small cell lung cancer but it is less common There are also

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/lung/lung-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Metastatic cancer overview - Canadian Cancer Society
    sites of metastases are bone brain liver lung Back to top Why cancers spread All cancers have the potential to spread Whether metastases will develop depends on many factors the type of cancer Some types of cancer tend to spread to certain parts of the body Breast cancer most often spreads to the bones liver lung or brain Colorectal cancer tends to spread to the liver Lung cancer often spreads to the brain bones or liver Prostate cancer tends to spread to the bones the grade of the cancer Low grade cancer cells are less aggressive and are less likely to metastasize High grade cancer cells are more aggressive and are more likely to metastasize the length of time the cancer has been present The risk of metastasis increases the longer a tumour is in the body the cancer cells ability to create a blood supply in a new location A cancerous tumour needs to set up a blood supply to grow the location of the primary tumour Each type of cancer has a particular way that it spreads Many metastases develop in the first area of blood vessels that cancer cells come to after leaving the primary tumour After leaving the primary tumour the lungs are one of the first places metastatic cells can be carried to by the bloodstream This may explain why metastases form in the lungs Back to top Signs and symptoms Some people may have no or few symptoms related to their metastasis Therefore a metastatic cancer may only be discovered during a routine examination or test Symptoms of metastatic cancer will depend on the particular location and size of the metastasis Bone metastases may cause pain or a break in the bone fracture It can also put pressure on a nerve or the spinal cord which can cause numbness or muscle weakness Brain metastases may cause headaches problems with balance or coordination or seizures Liver metastases may cause abdominal pain abdominal swelling or jaundice Lung metastases may cause cough or shortness of breath Getting regular checkups and reporting new symptoms are the best ways to detect metastatic cancer early In some cases the metastatic tumour is found before the primary tumour because it produces symptoms before the primary tumour does Back to top Diagnosis Diagnostic tests will be done if the signs and symptoms of metastatic cancer are present if the result of a follow up test is abnormal or if the doctor suspects a metastasis The types of tests done will depend on the area of the body where doctors suspect the cancer has spread Tests may include complete physical examination laboratory tests In some cases tumour marker tests are done Tumour markers are substances usually proteins that may indicate cancer is present Tumour markers for metastatic cancer are usually measured by doing blood tests imaging tests A bone scan is done to see if cancer has spread to the bone A computed tomography CT scan of the head is done to see

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/metastatic-cancer/metastatic-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is non-Hodgkin lymphoma? - Canadian Cancer Society
    weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Non Hodgkin lymphoma Recently viewed pages Non Hodgkin lymphoma Non Hodgkin lymphoma Metastatic cancer Metastatic cancer Lung Lung cancer Leukemia childhood Childhood leukemia Leukemia Leukemia Kidney Kidney cancer Colorectal Colorectal cancer Cervical Cervical cancer Breast Breast cancer Brain Spinal childhood Childhood brain and spinal tumours Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer type Non Hodgkin lymphoma Non Hodgkin lymphoma Non Hodgkin lymphoma Types of NHL Risks Finding cancer early Signs and symptoms Diagnosis Grading Staging If cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Treatment Supportive care Research Statistics Anatomy and physiology Glossary Every day I see cancer patients and their stories motivate me to continue searching for cancer solutions Read Alexandra s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More What is non Hodgkin lymphoma Non Hodgkin lymphoma NHL is a cancer that starts in lymphocytes Lymphocytes are cells of the lymphatic system The lymphatic system works with other parts of your immune system to help your body fight infection and disease The lymphatic system is made up of a network of lymph vessels lymph nodes and the lymphatic organs Lymph vessels carry lymph fluid which contains lymphocytes and other white blood cells antibodies and nutrients Lymph nodes sit along the lymph vessels and filter lymph fluid The lymphatic organs include the spleen thymus adenoids tonsils and bone marrow Lymphocytes develop in the bone marrow from basic cells called stem cells Stem cells develop into different types of cells that have different jobs Lymphocytes are types of white blood cells that help fight infection There are 2 types of lymphocytes B cells stay in the bone marrow until they mature T cells move to the thymus to mature Lymphocytes sometimes change and no longer grow or behave normally These abnormal cells can form tumours called lymphomas Non Hodgkin lymphoma can start from either B cells or T cells There are over 30 types of non Hodgkin lymphoma They are grouped based on the type of lymphocyte they started from Most types of NHL start in B cells and are called B cell lymphoma NHL can also start in T cells which is called T cell lymphoma The different types of NHL look different under a microscope They also develop and grow differently The grade of NHL is based on how different or abnormal the cancer cells look compared to normal lymphocytes The grade gives doctors an idea of how slowly or quickly the lymphoma will

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/non-hodgkin-lymphoma/non-hodgkin-lymphoma/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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