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  • Talking about cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    a corporate supporter Donating shares and other securities Leave a legacy Create a personal fundraising page Sponsor a participant Create a wedding fund Buy a luminary Asian Giving Major gifts How your donations help Funding research Events and Participation Find an event near you Relay For Life Daffodil Ball Daffodil Month Cops for Cancer Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Clinical trials Stem cell transplant Photodynamic therapy Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer journey Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Talking about cancer Telling family members and friends Telling children Telling people at work How people may react Sharing your feelings about cancer If you don t want to talk Your healthcare team Living with cancer Life after cancer Advanced cancer Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary Thanks to a new drug regimen developed through painstaking research Michael was declared cancer free in 2012 Read Michael s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More Talking about cancer Talking to other people about cancer can be one of the most difficult parts of coping with a cancer

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/talking-about-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Your healthcare team - Canadian Cancer Society
    Cancer treatment often involves a team of different healthcare professionals doctors nurses pharmacists dietitians social workers and others Your healthcare team is there to treat your cancer and to help you and your family Among other things they can provide information about cancer help you manage side effects and emotions give you emotional support help you find your way through the healthcare system suggest services in the community for practical help or emotional support You are the most important part of your healthcare team Stay involved with your team by keeping track of and sharing information about side effects and how you are coping Some of the people below will be members of your healthcare team Anesthesiologist or anesthetist This doctor gives anesthetics drugs that cause a loss of feeling or awareness to prevent or relieve pain during surgery and other procedures done in the hospital Dietitian A dietitian teaches you about healthy eating and helps with eating problems that may be a side effect of cancer treatment Family doctor general practitioner GP A family doctor gives general primary care and plays an important part in a person s general healthcare before during and after cancer treatments Medical oncologist This doctor specializes in diagnosing and treating cancer using chemotherapy hormonal therapy biological therapy or supportive therapy A medical oncologist is often the main doctor for someone with cancer They give supportive care and may coordinate treatment given by other specialists Nurse Nurses give daily nursing care in the hospital or at home and often have the most contact with you Nurses can answer questions and give you medicine and emotional support Occupational therapist Occupational therapists help you maintain your daily activities They can help you return to work and adjust your work activities They can also make suggestions to modify your home while you have treatment or deal with side effects Oncologist This type of doctor specializes in the treatment of cancer Oncologists have received special training in surgery radiation therapy or treating cancer using medicines such as chemotherapy drugs Oncology nurse An oncology nurse has received special education to care for people with cancer Oncology nurses may work in chemotherapy departments radiation therapy departments bone marrow transplant units in patient oncology units or the community An oncology nurse will help you meet your physical and emotional needs and can connect you with the resources you may require Oncology nurse practitioner An oncology nurse practitioner provides care to people with cancer and is involved in research teaching leadership and administration Pathologist A pathologist is a doctor who studies cells and tissues under a microscope to make a diagnosis of cancer or to see how cancer is responding to treatment Patient advocate A patient or client advocate helps you communicate or work better with others involved in your care such as doctors nurses or social workers Patient navigator A patient or nurse navigator acts as a link between you and the healthcare system They may coordinate services and address a variety

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/your-healthcare-team/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Living with cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    a wedding fund Buy a luminary Asian Giving Major gifts How your donations help Funding research Events and Participation Find an event near you Relay For Life Daffodil Ball Daffodil Month Cops for Cancer Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Clinical trials Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer journey Living with cancer Recently diagnosed Talking about cancer Your healthcare team Living with cancer Dealing with change Stress Coping within a family Getting help from others Nutrition for cancer patients Physical activity during cancer treatment Sexuality and cancer Spirituality Life after cancer Advanced cancer Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary Quality of life important for caregivers as well as patients Read more Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team We fund research 753 scientific papers based on Society funded research were published in peer reviewed journals Learn More Living with cancer When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer it s hard to know what to expect In the early days after diagnosis your main focus might be learning about the cancer and working with your healthcare team to come up with a treatment plan But medical issues are only one part of living with cancer It s important to know that

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/living-with-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Life after cancer treatment - Canadian Cancer Society
    Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Life after cancer Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer journey Life after cancer Recently diagnosed Talking about cancer Your healthcare team Living with cancer Life after cancer Your feelings after cancer Worrying that the cancer will come back Thinking about the future Work and finances Relationships after cancer Your wellness plan Pregnancy after cancer treatment Late and long term effects of treatment Advanced cancer Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary The Caps family is a group that not only loves the game but helps create a community that wants to make a difference Read Bob s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Cancer information in over a hundred languages The Canadian Cancer Society s Cancer Information Service CIS is Canada s only national bilingual toll free service that offers personalized comprehensive cancer information in over 100 languages Learn More Life after cancer treatment During treatment you were probably so busy just getting through each day that it was hard to imagine that treatment would ever end Now that it has you may be surprised by mixed feelings You may find that you feel glad excited and anxious all at the same time While you re happy to be done treatment it s normal to be concerned about what the future

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/life-after-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Advanced cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    If you re a caregiver Glossary I m a practising oncologist and fully aware of the concerns my patients have and the difficulties they have to go through Read Eshwar s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More Advanced cancer A diagnosis of advanced cancer can be very hard to understand and accept If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with advanced cancer you may feel overwhelmed like you can t take it all in or that it s just a bad dream You might not be sure that you understand what the doctor meant Advanced cancer is defined as cancer that is unlikely to be cured Healthcare professionals may also use the terms secondary metastatic terminal or progressive cancer to describe it Most people living with advanced cancer experience a wide range of feelings and emotions as they come to accept the diagnosis These feelings can be overwhelming at first but most become more manageable as you get used to the diagnosis and start to make plans and decisions Shock and disbelief It s difficult to hear that cancer can t be cured and you may not want to believe what you ve been told Many people say they feel numb or like they re walking around in a fog Anger It s normal to be angry at the person who has told you the news or angry that the treatment hasn t worked Your anger could be directed anywhere from your family and friends to your god or fate Sadness loneliness and isolation Finding out you or someone you love has advanced cancer usually leads to a deep sense of loss While family and friends may want to be close to you you may not feel like you want to be around people as you come to terms with the diagnosis You may feel isolated as if no one could possibly understand what you re going through Guilt Some people diagnosed with cancer feel guilty for leaving loved ones behind or causing sorrow Some people worry that they should have gone to the doctor earlier or fought harder against the disease Loved ones may feel guilty that they haven t done enough Fear It s normal to feel very scared of advanced cancer People with advanced cancer may fear being in pain and suffering being left alone or dying alone becoming a burden losing control of the body and needing others help losing dignity the unknown and the future leaving loved ones behind Moving forward Accepting the diagnosis and adjusting to life with advanced cancer often takes time Acceptance doesn t mean giving up Rather acceptance allows you to take control of your life and focus on what

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/advanced-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Helping someone with cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    limit what your friend can do at least for a while Don t stay too long You don t want to tire your friend out Giving gifts Some people like to give or send gifts but don t feel that you have to If you do want to give a gift think about what might make your friend feel good or help with something practical Don t forget to consider whether the demands of cancer and its treatment have affected your friend s time energy concentration and ability to get around Caregivers may also appreciate gifts and cards with words of support Here are a few gift ideas magazines or books music DVDs puzzle books note cards or a journal gift certificates for a housecleaning service gift certificates for spa services pyjamas or a robe Back to top Talking to someone with cancer Many people are afraid of saying the wrong thing to someone with cancer You ll do just fine if you use your own words to show interest and concern express encouragement or offer support You might say I m not sure what to say but I want you to know that I care about you I m sorry that you re going through this If you ever feel like talking I m here to listen What are you feeling This may help someone start talking more than asking How are you feeling I m thinking of you You re in my prayers Don t say I know how you feel If you haven t had the same experience with cancer then you don t I don t know how you manage Don t worry I m sure you ll be fine Tell me what I can do to help Instead be specific about what you can do How much time do the doctors give you I know someone who had the same thing and it was really horrible I feel so bad about this It s making me cry all the time This isn t about you Back to top How to be a good listener Being a good listener means trying to be aware of someone s thoughts and feelings as much as you can These tips should help Get the basics right Try to keep the setting as private as possible Do your best to look comfortable and relaxed even if you re nervous Keep a comfortable amount of space between you and your friend Too much distance can make things feel formal and too little can feel cramped Try to make sure there are no physical obstacles between you If your friend is in hospital and there s a table in the way it s okay to say something like It s not very easy to talk across this table Can I move it for our visit Let the person with cancer be the leader If they want to talk listen Don t be offended if they don t want to talk Try to keep eye contact but don t maintain it for so long that it feels like staring Be aware of how the other person feels there may be different cultural approaches to eye contact Help don t hinder the conversation Don t interrupt Wait for your friend to stop speaking before you start and give your full attention to what your friend is saying Try not to jump ahead in your thoughts to how you re going to reply or what you ll say next Encourage the person with cancer to talk freely It can help to nod and say things like Yes I see or And then what happened You can also try repeating a few words from their last sentence this will help them feel that they are being heard It can really help to just listen while your friend talks about what they want to talk about even if it s distressing for you If you find the topic too hard you can say so and offer to try to talk about it later Don t simply change the subject without acknowledging the fact that what your friend is talking about is important to you both Admit that you don t know what to say or that you find things difficult to talk about Getting this out in the open can actually help the conversation because it reduces feelings of awkwardness Avoid giving advice unless you re sure you ve been asked for it Don t give it too early in the conversation because it will stop a 2 way discussion Do not give medical advice or talk about someone else s cancer experience Respond to humour if your friend uses it While cancer may not be funny humour is a very helpful way of coping with major threats and fears It can help with intense feelings and often helps get things in perspective So if your friend wants to use humour go along with it Use silence and touch Don t feel that you have to say something all the time Silence can help people pull their thoughts together Wait with your friend for a moment and then ask what they were thinking about Don t rush it even if the silence seems to last a long time Hold your friend s hand or touch them if it feels right to do so while you re waiting If they pull away simply draw back and give them some space Allow your friend to be upset It s important to allow people to say that they feel sad or upset Try to be willing to talk about tough topics like the chance of the cancer being cured or making a will It can be tempting to try to cheer them up by saying things like Of course you ll be fine just try to be positive but this will actually stop someone from talking about how they really feel It s better to let them speak freely and

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/helping-someone-with-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • If you’re a caregiver - Canadian Cancer Society
    illness Some people may believe that telling the loved one about the cancer diagnosis may bring about unnecessary worry or stress or that it may take away all hope It s important for the healthcare team to know about your family s values and beliefs Don t hesitate to tell them about any cultural beliefs that affect how you and your family approach the cancer journey Your team may be able to suggest important topics to consider as you make your decisions As you re thinking about what to do and considering the individual needs of each person and factors that are important to your family it might be helpful to know that the person with cancer usually learns about their diagnosis sooner or later Most cancer patients agree that hiding the diagnosis from them denies them the chance to make important decisions about their treatment and their future There are advantages to being open and honest When there are no secrets it s easier on everyone concerned to approach the cancer diagnosis as a fact of life It s also easier to discuss the experience and offer support when nothing is being hidden Talking about cancer and sharing feelings is hard for many people but it can be even harder to hide your thoughts and feelings about a cancer diagnosis Back to top Good communication is key Good communication between the healthcare team your loved one and you can greatly improve your loved one s care You may be responsible for communicating your loved one s wants and needs to the healthcare team You may also be responsible for updating family and friends about your loved one Holding regular family meetings can be a good way to keep family and friends up to date and to plan for the weeks ahead Talk openly with friends and family and be clear with what you need and how they can help whether it s preparing meals looking after children or going to an appointment At family meetings you can share information questions or concerns discuss the weeks ahead and plan for tests treatments and appointments spend time together just to support and comfort each other give people jobs to do in the weeks ahead to share in the care of your loved one Back to top Doctor s appointments You may attend doctor s appointments with your loved one Your loved one may ask you to be the one to talk to the healthcare team and make important decisions Write down any questions you have or things you would like to say before the appointment Keep a folder of your loved one s health information including a list of all medicines and take it with you Share information with the healthcare team about any pain or side effects your loved one is experiencing Back to top Giving comfort and emotional support Caregivers are usually the main source of comfort and emotional support for their loved one Good communication with and understanding of your loved one is important You can have a very positive effect on how your loved one copes with cancer if you Involve them as much as possible Allow them to continue with day to day care and activities if they feel up to it Let them know that you re there to help but let them decide when they need help Help them to live as normally as possible Help them to prioritize which activities they can do and enjoy most Share your feelings with them and encourage them to share theirs Listen and allow them to express fears and concerns about what is going to happen Listen when they want to talk and respect their need for privacy when they don t feel like talking Make sure they know you ll be there when they re ready Keep the person company Talking with them watching movies together listening to music playing cards or just being with the person can be comforting Sometimes when you can t find words a squeeze of the hand or a gentle hug can say just as much Touch is a powerful way to communicate and can show how much you care Respect their need to be alone sometimes Look after your own emotional needs too If you re having problems sharing your feelings and communicating with each other talk to your healthcare team or join a support group It may be helpful to talk to others who are experiencing the same thing There are support groups that include both caregivers and people living with cancer and those that provide support individually for either caregivers or people living with cancer Back to top Giving physical care You may provide physical care for your loved one Ask your healthcare team for information and ideas on caring for your loved one Assistive devices are tools that can help your loved one be more independent and make your job easier These tools may be a walker lift wheelchair shower chair grab bars portable commodes or urinals A home care nurse physiotherapist or occupational therapist may be able to provide support and give you ideas to help your loved one You may need to learn how to help with bathing helping them get in and out of the tub or shower or giving sponge baths in bed lifting and moving helping them get into or out of a bed or chair moving cushions or helping them turn or roll over in bed bathroom getting onto and off the toilet using bedpans incontinence pads or catheters mouth care brushing teeth keeping lips moist or rinsing the mouth hair skin and nail care washing and drying their hair moisturizing skin and trimming nails giving medicine keeping track of timing dosages and storage of medicines Back to top Looking after yourself Caring for a loved one who is ill can be physically and emotionally demanding As a caregiver you may be so focused on the person you re caring for

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/if-you-re-a-caregiver/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is cancer? - Canadian Cancer Society
    near you Relay For Life Daffodil Ball Daffodil Month Cops for Cancer Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Life after cancer Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer 101 What is cancer What is cancer The human body The immune system The bone marrow The cell cycle Cancer cell development Types of tumours How cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Cancer statistics at a glance Canadian Cancer Statistics publication What is a risk factor How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary Dr Mak was inducted as an Officer of the Order of Canada in 2000 Read Dr Mak s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team We fund research 753 scientific papers based on Society funded research were published in peer reviewed journals Learn More What is cancer Cancer is a disease that starts in our cells Our bodies are made up of millions of cells grouped together to form tissues and organs such as muscles and bones the lungs and the liver Genes inside each cell order it to grow work reproduce and die Normally our cells obey these orders and we remain healthy But sometimes the instructions get mixed up causing the cells to form lumps or tumours or spread through the bloodstream

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/what-is-cancer/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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