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  • Cancer statistics at a glance - Canadian Cancer Society
    research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Providing rides to cancer treatment For more than 50 years the Canadian Cancer Society s transportation program has enabled patients to focus their energy on fighting cancer and not on worrying about how they will get to treatment Learn More Cancer statistics at a glance Cancer statistics tell us how many people in Canada are diagnosed with and die from cancer each year They show us the trends in new cases and cancer deaths Cancer statistics also tell us the likelihood of surviving a cancer diagnosis and the number of people who are alive after a cancer diagnosis Canadian provinces and territories collect data on cancer cases and cancer deaths These data are combined to provide a picture of the impact of cancer for all of Canada Statistics are an important part of planning and measuring the success of cancer control Incidence and mortality Incidence is the total number of new cases of cancer Mortality is the number of deaths due to cancer To provide the most current cancer statistics researchers use statistical methods to estimate the number of new cancer cases and deaths until actual data become available An estimated 191 300 new cases of cancer and 76 600 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2014 The number of estimated new cases does not include 76 100 new non melanoma skin cancer cases Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada and is responsible for 30 of all deaths Note The total of all deaths in 2011 in Canada was 242 074 Adapted from Statistics Canada Leading Causes of Death in Canada 2011 CANSIM Table 102 0522 It is estimated that in 2014 97 700 Canadian men will be diagnosed with cancer and 40 000 men will die from cancer 93 600 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cancer and 36 600 women will die from cancer On average 524 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer every day On average 210 Canadians will die from cancer every day Lung breast colorectal and prostate cancer are the most common types of cancer in Canada excluding non melanoma skin cancer Based on 2014 estimates These cancers account for over half 52 of all new cancer cases Prostate cancer accounts for about one quarter 24 of all new cancer cases in men Lung cancer accounts for 14 of all new cases of cancer Breast cancer accounts for about one quarter 26 of all new cancer cases in women Colorectal cancer accounts for 13 of all new cancer cases Trends in cancer rates Cancer is a disease that mostly affects Canadians aged 50 and older but it can occur at any age Across Canada cancer incidence rates vary because of differences in the type of population risk factors including risk behaviours and early detection practices Similarly rates of cancer death vary because cancer screening rates and the availability and use of treatment vary across

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/cancer-statistics-at-a-glance/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Canadian Cancer Statistics publication - Canadian Cancer Society
    caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Life after cancer Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer 101 Canadian Cancer Statistics publication What is cancer Cancer statistics at a glance Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Past editions Canadian Cancer Statistics What is a risk factor How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary I made a pledge that nothing would ever break the bond I shared with my new son Read Amanda s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Interactive prevention tool Questions to ask your healthcare team Volunteers provide comfort and kindness Thousands of Canadian Cancer Society volunteers work in regional cancer centres lodges and community hospitals to support people receiving treatment Learn More Canadian Cancer Statistics publication This annual publication provides health professionals researchers policy makers and the general public with detailed information about incidence mortality and other statistics for the most common types of cancer by age sex year and province or territory It is developed through collaboration between the Canadian Cancer Society the Public Health Agency of Canada Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries with input from the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee Download current edition Evaluate or sign up to be notified about future editions Media release 2014 2014 cancer statistics figures in PowerPoint Introductory figures A D Figures 1 1 2 4 incidence Figures 3 1 4 4 mortality Figures 5 1 6 2 survival and prevalence Figures 7 2 7 7 skin cancer Selected data files in Excel Additional sections not included in the publication Table W1 Potential years of life lost due to cancer Canada 2009 National statistics at a glance from Canadian Cancer Statistics An estimated 191 300 new cases of cancer excluding about 76 100 non melanoma skin cancers and 76 600 deaths will occur in Canada in 2014 More than half about 52 of all new cases will be prostate breast lung and colorectal cancers About 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes and 1 in 4 will die of the disease 63 of Canadians diagnosed with cancer will survive at least 5 years after their diagnosis At the beginning of 2009 there were about 810 045 Canadians living with a cancer that had been diagnosed in the previous 10 years British Columbia statistics at a glance from Canadian Cancer Statistics Overview of new cases and deaths An estimated 191 300 new cases of cancer and 76 600 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2014 Lung breast colorectal and prostate cancer account for the top 4 diagnosed cancers In 2014 an estimated 9 900 people will die of cancer in British Columbia and 24 300 new cases will be diagnosed Cancer statistics for men in British Columbia For men in British Columbia prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed type of cancer In 2014

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/canadian-cancer-statistics-publication/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • What is a risk factor? - Canadian Cancer Society
    risks Family history Genetic risk Geographic location Height Hormones Medical history Occupational exposure Personal history of cancer Physical activity Sedentary behaviour Sex Socio economic status Stress Sun and UVR exposure Tobacco Viruses bacteria and other infectious agents Vitamin D Weakened immune system How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary In a strange way my cancer experience has given me a gift that I can use to help people with vision loss and people experiencing cancer Read Robert s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Interactive prevention tool Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More What is a risk factor Cancer risk refers to a person s chance of developing cancer A risk factor is any substance or condition that increases the risk of developing cancer There are very few cancers that have a single known cause Most cancers seem to be the result of a complex mix of many risk factors These risk factors may play different roles in starting cancer and helping it grow Some risk factors include heredity genetics lifestyle choices and exposure to cancer causing substances carcinogens in the environment In general the more often and the longer the exposure to a risk factor the greater the chance that cancer will develop It can take many years for cancer to develop after exposure to a risk factor Cancer usually develops after exposure to many risk factors over time People may be exposed to several risk factors in the course of their daily lives Some people have a higher risk of developing cancer because of certain risk factors Even if a person has one or more risk factors it is impossible to know exactly how much these factors may contribute to developing cancer later in life People at low risk may get cancer while people at high risk may not get cancer Low risk does not mean that a person will not get cancer It means that there is less chance of getting cancer High risk means that the chances of getting cancer may be greater but it does not mean that cancer will develop It isn t always clear why one person gets cancer and another doesn t Reviewing the scientific evidence on risks Over the years researchers have developed a better understanding of how cancers develop and grow Researchers look at all the scientific information to determine whether a substance causes or could cause cancer Scientists carefully review evidence from studies done in people and in the laboratory to determine whether a substance may increase the risk of cancer Scientists usually look at 3 things to determine if something is a risk factor for cancer How much how often and under what circumstances people are exposed to a particular substance Scientists are more

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/what-is-a-risk-factor/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • How to reduce cancer risk - Canadian Cancer Society
    Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages How to reduce cancer risk What is a risk factor Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Cancer statistics at a glance What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Life after cancer Living with cancer Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer 101 How to reduce cancer risk What is cancer Cancer statistics at a glance Canadian Cancer Statistics publication What is a risk factor How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary A sharper imaging method for cancer diagnosis Read more Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Interactive prevention tool Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More How to reduce cancer risk There are many known risk factors for cancer It has been estimated that smoking is responsible for 30 of all cancer deaths and that one third of cancers can be linked to diet obesity and lack of exercise Risk reduction is taking action to lower one s risk of developing cancer Risk can be increased or decreased by lifestyle choices and the kind of environment a person lives and works in About half of all cancers can be prevented through healthy living and policies that protect the public Reducing your risk To help reduce your risk of developing cancer follow these general steps Live well Make healthy choices Be

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/how-to-reduce-cancer-risk/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Cancer research - Canadian Cancer Society
    has shown that cancer is a very complex disease but researchers are closer than ever before to fully understanding many types of cancer As our knowledge of cancer continues to grow there will be even greater progress in cancer treatment Cancer treatment is based on scientific evidence which means it has been well tested in the laboratory and in groups of people A person with cancer may want to consider taking part in a clinical trial Clinical trials are research studies that test new ways to prevent detect treat or manage cancer Canada is an international leader in conducting clinical trials Thanks to gains in knowledge made by researchers here in Canada and around the world we are making great progress against cancer We are moving toward the day when some cancers will be curable and some cancers will be managed like chronic diseases just as diabetes and asthma are today Understanding the research process When we think about progress against cancer it is important to recognize that science is a step by step process where new discoveries often build on previous research studies Cancer research is a time consuming and expensive undertaking it can take years for researchers to complete a single study Each year hundreds of researchers working in hospitals research centres and other academic institutions across Canada apply for funds to support their work through the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute or other research focused organizations Applications for research funding undergo a strict review process that has been carefully designed to make sure only excellent research receives funding Researchers seek support for a variety of cancer research projects from basic laboratory research to clinical trials involving cancer prevention population health cancer treatment and quality of life Cancer research covers a wide range of activities and aspects of scientific study Some types of cancer research are discussed below Basic cancer research Basic cancer research takes place in the laboratory where scientists try to understand cancer at its deepest most fundamental level Most of this fundamental research takes place using cells grown in the laboratory or model organisms of disease such as specially developed mouse strains Understanding the basic processes of a cell may uncover answers about how normal cells become cancerous Researchers are doing a variety of basic studies including understanding how cell division and cell death are controlled discovering what makes cancer cells spread metastasize to other areas of the body looking for substances or markers that can be found in the bodies of people with cancer identifying unique characteristics of cancer cells to design new treatments with fewer side effects finding out why certain cancer cells and tumours become resistant to treatment looking at the genetic basis of different cancers and how each person s unique genetic profile can make them more vulnerable to cancer or provide insights on the most effective treatments for their particular disease Translational research A major focus of research today is to transfer basic discoveries made in the laboratory to clinical

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/cancer-research/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • How we can help - Canadian Cancer Society
    are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages How we can help Cancer research How to reduce cancer risk What is a risk factor Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Cancer statistics at a glance What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Support services Support and services How we can help How we can help Talk to an information specialist Talk to someone who s been there Connect with our online community Community Services Locator Quit smoking Wigs and hair donations Financial help Transportation Accommodation Camp Goodtimes Wigs and prosthesis His amazing career and legacy live on today inspiring a new generation of scientists who are discovering new ways to harness the power of medical imaging to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment Read Harold s story Links to help you Talking about cancer If you re a caregiver Working with your healthcare team Treatment Clinical trials we are funding Cancer myths and controversies Use your cancer experience to help others Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Relay For Life How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More How we can help If you or someone you care about has been diagnosed with cancer you ll have many questions and concerns We re here to help We offer support and information for people with cancer and their family friends and caregivers Fear anxiety helplessness anger these are feelings people can have when faced with a cancer diagnosis But knowledge and support are power Our services are free or low cost and confidential and many are available in multiple languages Cancer Information Service Available to cancer patients caregivers or anyone who needs help understanding cancer and finding community services Toll free service accessible in multiple languages CancerConnection CancerConnection matches patients or caregivers with a trained volunteer with a similar cancer experience CancerConnection ca CancerConnection ca is an online community for patients and caregivers to share experiences and find support Available 24hours a day Accommodation We operate affordable lodges across the province offering 24 hour support on premises from caring volunteers and staff and a host of amenities Transportation Program If you have cancer and you don t have transportation a volunteer driver may be able to pick you up and take you to your appointments Available in some locations Camp Goodtimes Camp Goodtimes provides a unique summer recreation experience for children and teens with cancer and their families Financial Support Program Limited short term assistance towards cancer related transportation and accommodation expenses Based on eligibility criteria Wig Lending Program Breast Prostheses The wig and breast prosthesis banks provide a wide range of headwear permanent prostheses and clothing to cancer patients at no cost If you are looking

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/support-and-services/support-services/how-we-can-help/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Talk to an information specialist - Canadian Cancer Society
    supporter Donating shares and other securities Leave a legacy Create a personal fundraising page Sponsor a participant Create a wedding fund Buy a luminary Asian Giving Major gifts How your donations help Funding research Events and Participation Find an event near you Relay For Life Daffodil Ball Daffodil Month Cops for Cancer Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Workshops and seminars Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Talk to an information specialist How we can help Cancer research How to reduce cancer risk What is a risk factor Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Cancer statistics at a glance What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Support services Support and services Talk to an information specialist How we can help Talk to an information specialist Talk to someone who s been there Connect with our online community Community Services Locator Quit smoking Wigs and hair donations Financial help Transportation Accommodation Camp Goodtimes Wigs and prosthesis Simple question helps restore patient dignity Read more Links to help you Talking about cancer If you re a caregiver Working with your healthcare team Treatment Clinical trials we are funding Cancer myths and controversies Use your cancer experience to help others Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Relay For Life 1 700 people with cancer participated in clinical trials funded by the Society Learn More Talk to an information specialist We re here to help Contact us at 1 888 939 3333 TTY 1 866 786 3934 or email info cis cancer ca Cancer can be

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/support-and-services/support-services/talk-to-an-information-specialist/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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  • Talk to someone who's been there - Canadian Cancer Society
    opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Tobacco control Local priorities Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Talk to someone who s been there Talk to an information specialist How we can help Cancer research How to reduce cancer risk What is a risk factor Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Cancer statistics at a glance What is cancer If you re a caregiver Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Support services Support and services Talk to someone who s been there How we can help Talk to an information specialist Talk to someone who s been there Connect with our online community Community Services Locator Quit smoking Wigs and hair donations Financial help Transportation Accommodation Camp Goodtimes Wigs and prosthesis The only way we are ultimately going to conquer cancer is through research Watch our video Links to help you Talking about cancer If you re a caregiver Working with your healthcare team Treatment Clinical trials we are funding Cancer myths and controversies Use your cancer experience to help others Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Relay For Life On average over 500 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer every day Learn More Talk to someone who s been there When a person is diagnosed with cancer they and their loved ones may feel like their world has turned upside down We know that talking to others who ve gone through a similar experience is comforting Our free CancerConnection service connects people living with cancer with trained volunteers who listen provide hope offer encouragement and share ideas for coping all from their unique perspective as someone who s been there How can this help me Many people who have used this service say it helped them get a better understanding of what to expect throughout their or their loved one s cancer experience making them feel more hopeful and less anxious It helped them cope What can I expect Support is provided over the telephone This confidential service is tailored to your needs and preferences We match you with a volunteer based on a number of factors including cancer type sex language and lifestyle How do I sign up The service is easy to access throughout Canada Call 1 888 939 3333 email info cis cancer ca or request a call One of our staff will register you with the service Who can use this service CancerConnection is available to people with cancer and their caregivers who are 18 and over In some cases your needs may go beyond what our volunteers can offer If that is the case we ll suggest other services that may be able to help You don t have to go through cancer alone Referrals by a healthcare provider If your patient or their caregiver would like to speak to someone who s had a similar cancer experience complete and submit a healthcare provider referral The personal information collected on the

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/support-and-services/support-services/talk-to-someone-who-has-been-there/?region=bc (2014-10-09)
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