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  • Rehabilitation - Canadian Cancer Society
    Life Relay For Life Daffodil Month Curl For Cancer Face Off Against Cancer Fundraise for Life Harvest of Hope Jail N Bail Online and door to door canvassing Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Vote for Health Tobacco control Compassionate care leave Cosmetic pesticides Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Clinical trials Stem cell transplant Photodynamic therapy Radiation therapy Chemotherapy and other drug therapies Surgery Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Diagnosis and treatment Rehabilitation Diagnosis Tests and procedures Staging and grading Treatment Surgery Chemotherapy and other drug therapies Radiation therapy Photodynamic therapy Stem cell transplant Clinical trials Managing side effects Pain Complementary therapies Rehabilitation Physical therapy Cognitive rehabilitation Living with an ostomy Living with a tracheostomy Prostheses Occupational therapy Speech therapy Swallowing problems Vocational counselling Cancer during pregnancy Glossary I wanted to take charge of my health and make informed decisions Read Sharon s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team The Society has produced and distributed 1 4 million print materials about all aspects of cancer Learn More Rehabilitation Rehabilitation and adjusting to life with cancer is a part of cancer care and treatment Rehabilitation is a process that assists a person with cancer to regain their ability to function at the highest level possible given any limits created by the disease or its treatment It can begin as soon as a person is first diagnosed and a treatment plan is made or started after treatment is

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/diagnosis-and-treatment/rehabilitation/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Cancer During Pregnancy - Canadian Cancer Society
    suspected Research has shown that the level of radiation in diagnostic x rays is quite low and may not be harmful to the fetus This depends on the age of the fetus the number of x rays used the amount of radiation exposure and whether or not the fetus is directly exposed to radiation Whenever possible a lead shield is used to cover the mother s abdomen and offers extra protection Diagnostic tests such as magnetic resonance imaging MRI and ultrasound are usually considered safe during pregnancy because they do not use radiation Physical examination and many biopsies are also safe and important in arriving at a cancer diagnosis Sometimes pregnancy can uncover cancer that has gone undetected For example a Pap test is often done as part of a woman s routine care during pregnancy and can detect cervical cancer Routine ultrasounds done during pregnancy may detect ovarian cancer Cancer treatment during pregnancy Treating cancer during pregnancy is very complex The best treatment for the mother and the possible risks or harm to the fetus are considered when looking at treatment options The type of treatment and when it may be given depends on many factors the location of the cancer the type of cancer the size of the tumour or stage of the cancer the stage of the pregnancy how old the fetus is the wishes of the mother and her partner Treatment is tailored to each woman Cancer treatments used during pregnancy may include surgery chemotherapy and sometimes radiation therapy but these are only used after careful consideration and planning to ensure the mother and baby s safety Some cancer treatments can harm a fetus especially during the first three months of pregnancy called the first trimester Sometimes cancer treatment may be delayed until later in the pregnancy during the second or third trimester When cancer is diagnosed later in a pregnancy sometimes it may be possible to wait to start treatment until after the baby is born The doctor may also consider bringing on labour early For some very early stage cancers such as very early stage cervical cancer it may be safe to continue the pregnancy to term and delay treatment until after the baby is born In some situations the woman her partner and the doctor need to discuss whether or not to continue with the pregnancy Not delaying treatment may be the safest option for some women with more advanced or aggressive cancers found early in a pregnancy Surgery Most biopsies can safely be done during pregnancy using a local anesthetic Generally surgery poses the least risk to the fetus and may be considered the safest cancer treatment option for some cancers especially after the first trimester Improvements in surgery and anesthetics and careful monitoring of the mother and baby make it possible to keep risks to a minimum In some cases more extensive surgery may be done to avoid having to use chemotherapy or radiation therapy Chemotherapy Chemotherapy is the use of

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/diagnosis-and-treatment/cancer-during-pregnancy/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Recently diagnosed - Canadian Cancer Society
    to quit and even those people who aren t ready Learn More Recently diagnosed A cancer diagnosis can affect much more than the physical body It can also affect emotions and relationships Your emotions can be very strong conflicting or disturbing They may come and go quickly and they may change often For many people life is not the same after a cancer diagnosis People respond to a diagnosis in different ways You may have many questions when you first find out that you have cancer You may feel shocked overwhelmed devastated numb afraid or angry or you may not believe it A cancer diagnosis can raise fears You may worry about death changes to your body painful treatments or feeling sick You may also worry about how your friends and family will react and how to cope with day to day tasks work or finances Some people feel alone even if friends and family are with them Others feel like they re watching things happen to someone else Some people find it hard to understand what the doctor is telling them and they need to be told the same information many times All of these responses are normal It s also normal for similar feelings and fears to come up a number of times throughout your cancer journey Why is this happening It s normal to wonder why you or someone you care for has cancer No one knows why Cancer is a complex disease and it is often impossible to know why things happen the way they do You may struggle with this throughout your cancer journey It might help to remember that knowing why will not change the course of the illness And continuing to wonder may get in the way of your ability to cope Your valuable energy could be better used to help you and your family deal with the disease Try to focus on the present and how to best deal with the situation ahead If you re having trouble with this it may help to talk to a counsellor or someone on your healthcare team Will there be pain Almost everyone worries that cancer or cancer treatment will be painful While some people do experience pain they may have pain only once in a while Some people don t have any pain at all There are many ways to control and prevent pain so living with cancer does not have to mean living with pain If you are worried about pain or if you are in pain tell someone on your healthcare team They are there to help you Feeling anxious or sad can sometimes make you more sensitive to pain or make pain seem worse Learning to cope with these emotions may help lessen your pain and improve your mood Finding ways to manage pain may make it easier to cope with your emotions Will I die When first diagnosed many people with cancer and their families think about the possibility of

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/recently-diagnosed/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Talking about cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    corporate supporter Leave a legacy Create a personal fundraising page Sponsor a participant Create a wedding fund Buy a lottery ticket Buy a luminary Buy daffodil mittens How your donations help Funding research Events and Participation Find an event near you Bark For Life Relay For Life Daffodil Month Curl For Cancer Face Off Against Cancer Fundraise for Life Harvest of Hope Jail N Bail Online and door to door canvassing Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Vote for Health Tobacco control Compassionate care leave Cosmetic pesticides Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Clinical trials Stem cell transplant Photodynamic therapy Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer journey Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Talking about cancer Telling family members and friends Telling children Telling people at work How people may react Sharing your feelings about cancer If you don t want to talk Your healthcare team Living with cancer Life after cancer Advanced cancer Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary We are very fortunate to be able to share this experience Read the story of Lynn Kacey and Britney Palidwar Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Trusted online community of support Cancerconnection ca provides a trusted online community for cancer patients their family and friends Learn More Talking about cancer Talking to other people about cancer can be one of the most

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/talking-about-cancer/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Your healthcare team - Canadian Cancer Society
    Service CIS is Canada s only national bilingual toll free service that offers personalized comprehensive cancer information in over 100 languages Learn More Your healthcare team Cancer treatment often involves a team of different healthcare professionals doctors nurses pharmacists dietitians social workers and others Your healthcare team is there to treat your cancer and to help you and your family Among other things they can provide information about cancer help you manage side effects and emotions give you emotional support help you find your way through the healthcare system suggest services in the community for practical help or emotional support You are the most important part of your healthcare team Stay involved with your team by keeping track of and sharing information about side effects and how you are coping Some of the people below will be members of your healthcare team Anesthesiologist or anesthetist This doctor gives anesthetics drugs that cause a loss of feeling or awareness to prevent or relieve pain during surgery and other procedures done in the hospital Dietitian A dietitian teaches you about healthy eating and helps with eating problems that may be a side effect of cancer treatment Family doctor general practitioner GP A family doctor gives general primary care and plays an important part in a person s general healthcare before during and after cancer treatments Medical oncologist This doctor specializes in diagnosing and treating cancer using chemotherapy hormonal therapy biological therapy or supportive therapy A medical oncologist is often the main doctor for someone with cancer They give supportive care and may coordinate treatment given by other specialists Nurse Nurses give daily nursing care in the hospital or at home and often have the most contact with you Nurses can answer questions and give you medicine and emotional support Occupational therapist Occupational therapists help you maintain your daily activities They can help you return to work and adjust your work activities They can also make suggestions to modify your home while you have treatment or deal with side effects Oncologist This type of doctor specializes in the treatment of cancer Oncologists have received special training in surgery radiation therapy or treating cancer using medicines such as chemotherapy drugs Oncology nurse An oncology nurse has received special education to care for people with cancer Oncology nurses may work in chemotherapy departments radiation therapy departments bone marrow transplant units in patient oncology units or the community An oncology nurse will help you meet your physical and emotional needs and can connect you with the resources you may require Oncology nurse practitioner An oncology nurse practitioner provides care to people with cancer and is involved in research teaching leadership and administration Pathologist A pathologist is a doctor who studies cells and tissues under a microscope to make a diagnosis of cancer or to see how cancer is responding to treatment Patient advocate A patient or client advocate helps you communicate or work better with others involved in your care such as doctors nurses or social

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/your-healthcare-team/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Living with cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    Life Relay For Life Daffodil Month Curl For Cancer Face Off Against Cancer Fundraise for Life Harvest of Hope Jail N Bail Online and door to door canvassing Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Vote for Health Tobacco control Compassionate care leave Cosmetic pesticides Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Clinical trials Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer journey Living with cancer Recently diagnosed Talking about cancer Your healthcare team Living with cancer Dealing with change Stress Coping within a family Getting help from others Nutrition for cancer patients Physical activity during cancer treatment Sexuality and cancer Spirituality Life after cancer Advanced cancer Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary It takes 3 seconds to ask Have you got your daffodil pin yet If you don t ask you don t get Read Dan s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Facing the financial burden of cancer The Canadian Cancer Society provides helpful information about government income programs financial resources and other resources available to families struggling to make sense of the personal financial burden they face Learn More Living with cancer When you or someone you love is diagnosed with cancer it s hard to know what to expect In the early days after diagnosis your main focus might be learning about the cancer

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/living-with-cancer/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Life after cancer treatment - Canadian Cancer Society
    N Bail Online and door to door canvassing Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Vote for Health Tobacco control Compassionate care leave Cosmetic pesticides Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages Life after cancer Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Rehabilitation Complementary therapies Pain Managing side effects Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer journey Life after cancer Recently diagnosed Talking about cancer Your healthcare team Living with cancer Life after cancer Your feelings after cancer Worrying that the cancer will come back Thinking about the future Work and finances Relationships after cancer Your wellness plan Pregnancy after cancer treatment Late and long term effects of treatment Advanced cancer Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary CancerConnection was an important lifeline It helped me get through a very dark time Read Mike s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Trusted online community of support Cancerconnection ca provides a trusted online community for cancer patients their family and friends Learn More Life after cancer treatment During treatment you were probably so busy just getting through each day that it was hard to imagine that treatment would ever end Now that it has you may be surprised by mixed feelings You may find that you feel glad excited and anxious all at the same time While you re happy to be done treatment it s normal to be concerned about what the

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/life-after-cancer/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Advanced cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    Grief bereavement Helping someone with cancer If your child has cancer If you re a caregiver Glossary My family doctor and my surgeon both have told me I would have had full blown colon cancer within a year Read Susan s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Providing rides to cancer treatment For more than 50 years the Canadian Cancer Society s transportation program has enabled patients to focus their energy on fighting cancer and not on worrying about how they will get to treatment Learn More Advanced cancer A diagnosis of advanced cancer can be very hard to understand and accept If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with advanced cancer you may feel overwhelmed like you can t take it all in or that it s just a bad dream You might not be sure that you understand what the doctor meant Advanced cancer is defined as cancer that is unlikely to be cured Healthcare professionals may also use the terms secondary metastatic terminal or progressive cancer to describe it Most people living with advanced cancer experience a wide range of feelings and emotions as they come to accept the diagnosis These feelings can be overwhelming at first but most become more manageable as you get used to the diagnosis and start to make plans and decisions Shock and disbelief It s difficult to hear that cancer can t be cured and you may not want to believe what you ve been told Many people say they feel numb or like they re walking around in a fog Anger It s normal to be angry at the person who has told you the news or angry that the treatment hasn t worked Your anger could be directed anywhere from your family and friends to your god or fate Sadness loneliness and isolation Finding out you or someone you love has advanced cancer usually leads to a deep sense of loss While family and friends may want to be close to you you may not feel like you want to be around people as you come to terms with the diagnosis You may feel isolated as if no one could possibly understand what you re going through Guilt Some people diagnosed with cancer feel guilty for leaving loved ones behind or causing sorrow Some people worry that they should have gone to the doctor earlier or fought harder against the disease Loved ones may feel guilty that they haven t done enough Fear It s normal to feel very scared of advanced cancer People with advanced cancer may fear being in pain and suffering being left alone or dying alone becoming a burden losing control of the body and needing others help losing dignity the unknown and the future leaving loved ones behind Moving forward Accepting the diagnosis and adjusting to life with advanced cancer often takes time Acceptance doesn t

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/advanced-cancer/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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