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  • Helping someone with cancer - Canadian Cancer Society
    a shared hobby Keep in mind that cancer or treatment may limit what your friend can do at least for a while Don t stay too long You don t want to tire your friend out Giving gifts Some people like to give or send gifts but don t feel that you have to If you do want to give a gift think about what might make your friend feel good or help with something practical Don t forget to consider whether the demands of cancer and its treatment have affected your friend s time energy concentration and ability to get around Caregivers may also appreciate gifts and cards with words of support Here are a few gift ideas magazines or books music DVDs puzzle books note cards or a journal gift certificates for a housecleaning service gift certificates for spa services pyjamas or a robe Back to top Talking to someone with cancer Many people are afraid of saying the wrong thing to someone with cancer You ll do just fine if you use your own words to show interest and concern express encouragement or offer support You might say I m not sure what to say but I want you to know that I care about you I m sorry that you re going through this If you ever feel like talking I m here to listen What are you feeling This may help someone start talking more than asking How are you feeling I m thinking of you You re in my prayers Don t say I know how you feel If you haven t had the same experience with cancer then you don t I don t know how you manage Don t worry I m sure you ll be fine Tell me what I can do to help Instead be specific about what you can do How much time do the doctors give you I know someone who had the same thing and it was really horrible I feel so bad about this It s making me cry all the time This isn t about you Back to top How to be a good listener Being a good listener means trying to be aware of someone s thoughts and feelings as much as you can These tips should help Get the basics right Try to keep the setting as private as possible Do your best to look comfortable and relaxed even if you re nervous Keep a comfortable amount of space between you and your friend Too much distance can make things feel formal and too little can feel cramped Try to make sure there are no physical obstacles between you If your friend is in hospital and there s a table in the way it s okay to say something like It s not very easy to talk across this table Can I move it for our visit Let the person with cancer be the leader If they want to talk listen Don t be offended if they don t want to talk Try to keep eye contact but don t maintain it for so long that it feels like staring Be aware of how the other person feels there may be different cultural approaches to eye contact Help don t hinder the conversation Don t interrupt Wait for your friend to stop speaking before you start and give your full attention to what your friend is saying Try not to jump ahead in your thoughts to how you re going to reply or what you ll say next Encourage the person with cancer to talk freely It can help to nod and say things like Yes I see or And then what happened You can also try repeating a few words from their last sentence this will help them feel that they are being heard It can really help to just listen while your friend talks about what they want to talk about even if it s distressing for you If you find the topic too hard you can say so and offer to try to talk about it later Don t simply change the subject without acknowledging the fact that what your friend is talking about is important to you both Admit that you don t know what to say or that you find things difficult to talk about Getting this out in the open can actually help the conversation because it reduces feelings of awkwardness Avoid giving advice unless you re sure you ve been asked for it Don t give it too early in the conversation because it will stop a 2 way discussion Do not give medical advice or talk about someone else s cancer experience Respond to humour if your friend uses it While cancer may not be funny humour is a very helpful way of coping with major threats and fears It can help with intense feelings and often helps get things in perspective So if your friend wants to use humour go along with it Use silence and touch Don t feel that you have to say something all the time Silence can help people pull their thoughts together Wait with your friend for a moment and then ask what they were thinking about Don t rush it even if the silence seems to last a long time Hold your friend s hand or touch them if it feels right to do so while you re waiting If they pull away simply draw back and give them some space Allow your friend to be upset It s important to allow people to say that they feel sad or upset Try to be willing to talk about tough topics like the chance of the cancer being cured or making a will It can be tempting to try to cheer them up by saying things like Of course you ll be fine just try to be positive but this will actually stop someone from talking about how they

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/helping-someone-with-cancer/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • If you’re a caregiver - Canadian Cancer Society
    is discussed and dealt with In some cultures talking about a serious illness or death is considered disrespectful to the person with the illness Some people may believe that telling the loved one about the cancer diagnosis may bring about unnecessary worry or stress or that it may take away all hope It s important for the healthcare team to know about your family s values and beliefs Don t hesitate to tell them about any cultural beliefs that affect how you and your family approach the cancer journey Your team may be able to suggest important topics to consider as you make your decisions As you re thinking about what to do and considering the individual needs of each person and factors that are important to your family it might be helpful to know that the person with cancer usually learns about their diagnosis sooner or later Most cancer patients agree that hiding the diagnosis from them denies them the chance to make important decisions about their treatment and their future There are advantages to being open and honest When there are no secrets it s easier on everyone concerned to approach the cancer diagnosis as a fact of life It s also easier to discuss the experience and offer support when nothing is being hidden Talking about cancer and sharing feelings is hard for many people but it can be even harder to hide your thoughts and feelings about a cancer diagnosis Back to top Good communication is key Good communication between the healthcare team your loved one and you can greatly improve your loved one s care You may be responsible for communicating your loved one s wants and needs to the healthcare team You may also be responsible for updating family and friends about your loved one Holding regular family meetings can be a good way to keep family and friends up to date and to plan for the weeks ahead Talk openly with friends and family and be clear with what you need and how they can help whether it s preparing meals looking after children or going to an appointment At family meetings you can share information questions or concerns discuss the weeks ahead and plan for tests treatments and appointments spend time together just to support and comfort each other give people jobs to do in the weeks ahead to share in the care of your loved one Back to top Doctor s appointments You may attend doctor s appointments with your loved one Your loved one may ask you to be the one to talk to the healthcare team and make important decisions Write down any questions you have or things you would like to say before the appointment Keep a folder of your loved one s health information including a list of all medicines and take it with you Share information with the healthcare team about any pain or side effects your loved one is experiencing Back to top Giving comfort and emotional support Caregivers are usually the main source of comfort and emotional support for their loved one Good communication with and understanding of your loved one is important You can have a very positive effect on how your loved one copes with cancer if you Involve them as much as possible Allow them to continue with day to day care and activities if they feel up to it Let them know that you re there to help but let them decide when they need help Help them to live as normally as possible Help them to prioritize which activities they can do and enjoy most Share your feelings with them and encourage them to share theirs Listen and allow them to express fears and concerns about what is going to happen Listen when they want to talk and respect their need for privacy when they don t feel like talking Make sure they know you ll be there when they re ready Keep the person company Talking with them watching movies together listening to music playing cards or just being with the person can be comforting Sometimes when you can t find words a squeeze of the hand or a gentle hug can say just as much Touch is a powerful way to communicate and can show how much you care Respect their need to be alone sometimes Look after your own emotional needs too If you re having problems sharing your feelings and communicating with each other talk to your healthcare team or join a support group It may be helpful to talk to others who are experiencing the same thing There are support groups that include both caregivers and people living with cancer and those that provide support individually for either caregivers or people living with cancer Back to top Giving physical care You may provide physical care for your loved one Ask your healthcare team for information and ideas on caring for your loved one Assistive devices are tools that can help your loved one be more independent and make your job easier These tools may be a walker lift wheelchair shower chair grab bars portable commodes or urinals A home care nurse physiotherapist or occupational therapist may be able to provide support and give you ideas to help your loved one You may need to learn how to help with bathing helping them get in and out of the tub or shower or giving sponge baths in bed lifting and moving helping them get into or out of a bed or chair moving cushions or helping them turn or roll over in bed bathroom getting onto and off the toilet using bedpans incontinence pads or catheters mouth care brushing teeth keeping lips moist or rinsing the mouth hair skin and nail care washing and drying their hair moisturizing skin and trimming nails giving medicine keeping track of timing dosages and storage of medicines Back to top Looking after yourself Caring for a loved one who

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-journey/if-you-re-a-caregiver/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • What is cancer? - Canadian Cancer Society
    for Life Harvest of Hope Jail N Bail Online and door to door canvassing Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Vote for Health Tobacco control Compassionate care leave Cosmetic pesticides Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Life after cancer Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Recently diagnosed Cancer during pregnancy Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer 101 What is cancer What is cancer The human body The immune system The bone marrow The cell cycle Cancer cell development Types of tumours How cancer spreads Prognosis and survival Cancer statistics at a glance Canadian Cancer Statistics publication What is a risk factor How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary Quality of life important for caregivers as well as patients Read more Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team Clinical trial discovery improves quality of life A clinical trial led by the Society s NCIC Clinical Trials group found that men with prostate cancer who are treated with intermittent courses of hormone therapy live as long as those receiving continuous therapy Learn More What is cancer Cancer is a disease that starts in our cells Our bodies are made up of millions of cells grouped together to form tissues and organs such as muscles and bones the lungs and the liver Genes inside each cell order it to grow work reproduce and die Normally our cells obey these orders and

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/what-is-cancer/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Cancer statistics at a glance - Canadian Cancer Society
    Glossary A cancer s behaviour may depend on the patient s age Read more Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Questions to ask your healthcare team The Society has produced and distributed 1 4 million print materials about all aspects of cancer Learn More Cancer statistics at a glance Cancer statistics tell us how many people in Canada are diagnosed with and die from cancer each year They show us the trends in new cases and cancer deaths Cancer statistics also tell us the likelihood of surviving a cancer diagnosis and the number of people who are alive after a cancer diagnosis Canadian provinces and territories collect data on cancer cases and cancer deaths These data are combined to provide a picture of the impact of cancer for all of Canada Statistics are an important part of planning and measuring the success of cancer control Incidence and mortality Incidence is the total number of new cases of cancer Mortality is the number of deaths due to cancer To provide the most current cancer statistics researchers use statistical methods to estimate the number of new cancer cases and deaths until actual data become available An estimated 191 300 new cases of cancer and 76 600 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2014 The number of estimated new cases does not include 76 100 new non melanoma skin cancer cases Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada and is responsible for 30 of all deaths Note The total of all deaths in 2011 in Canada was 242 074 Adapted from Statistics Canada Leading Causes of Death in Canada 2011 CANSIM Table 102 0522 It is estimated that in 2014 97 700 Canadian men will be diagnosed with cancer and 40 000 men will die from cancer 93 600 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cancer and 36 600 women will die from cancer On average 524 Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer every day On average 210 Canadians will die from cancer every day Lung breast colorectal and prostate cancer are the most common types of cancer in Canada excluding non melanoma skin cancer Based on 2014 estimates These cancers account for over half 52 of all new cancer cases Prostate cancer accounts for about one quarter 24 of all new cancer cases in men Lung cancer accounts for 14 of all new cases of cancer Breast cancer accounts for about one quarter 26 of all new cancer cases in women Colorectal cancer accounts for 13 of all new cancer cases Trends in cancer rates Cancer is a disease that mostly affects Canadians aged 50 and older but it can occur at any age Across Canada cancer incidence rates vary because of differences in the type of population risk factors including risk behaviours and early detection practices Similarly rates of cancer death vary because cancer screening rates and the availability and use of treatment vary across the country Chances

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/cancer-statistics-at-a-glance/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Canadian Cancer Statistics publication - Canadian Cancer Society
    Cancer Statistics publication Cancer statistics at a glance What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Life after cancer Living with cancer Your healthcare team Talking about cancer Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer 101 Canadian Cancer Statistics publication What is cancer Cancer statistics at a glance Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Past editions Canadian Cancer Statistics What is a risk factor How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary When Tammy Horvath was diagnosed with a rare uterine sarcoma she was 34 and the mother of 2 sons Read Tammy s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Interactive prevention tool Questions to ask your healthcare team How can you stop cancer before it starts Discover how your lifestyle choices can affect cancer risk and how you can take action with our interactive tool It s My Life Learn More Canadian Cancer Statistics publication This annual publication provides health professionals researchers policy makers and the general public with detailed information about incidence mortality and other statistics for the most common types of cancer by age sex year and province or territory It is developed through collaboration between the Canadian Cancer Society the Public Health Agency of Canada Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries with input from the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee Download current edition Evaluate or sign up to be notified about future editions Media release 2014 2014 cancer statistics figures in PowerPoint Introductory figures A D Figures 1 1 2 4 incidence Figures 3 1 4 4 mortality Figures 5 1 6 2 survival and prevalence Figures 7 2 7 7 skin cancer Selected data files in Excel Additional sections not included in the publication Table W1 Potential years of life lost due to cancer Canada 2009 National statistics at a glance from Canadian Cancer Statistics An estimated 191 300 new cases of cancer excluding about 76 100 non melanoma skin cancers and 76 600 deaths will occur in Canada in 2014 More than half about 52 of all new cases will be prostate breast lung and colorectal cancers About 2 in 5 Canadians will develop cancer in their lifetimes and 1 in 4 will die of the disease 63 of Canadians diagnosed with cancer will survive at least 5 years after their diagnosis At the beginning of 2009 there were about 810 045 Canadians living with a cancer that had been diagnosed in the previous 10 years Alberta statistics at a glance from Canadian Cancer Statistics Overview of new cases and deaths An estimated 191 300 new cases of cancer and 76 600 deaths from cancer will occur in Canada in 2014 Lung breast colorectal and prostate cancer account for the top 4 diagnosed cancers In 2014 an estimated 6 400 people will die of cancer in Alberta and 16 500 new cases will be diagnosed Cancer statistics for

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/canadian-cancer-statistics-publication/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • What is a risk factor? - Canadian Cancer Society
    Statistics publication What is a risk factor Age Alcohol Ancestry Birth weight Body weight Cancer clusters Diet Environmental risks Family history Genetic risk Geographic location Height Hormones Medical history Occupational exposure Personal history of cancer Physical activity Sedentary behaviour Sex Socio economic status Stress Sun and UVR exposure Tobacco Viruses bacteria and other infectious agents Vitamin D Weakened immune system How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary Volunteering during Daffodil Month is an incredibly rewarding experience whether you have been touched by cancer or not Read Paul s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Interactive prevention tool Questions to ask your healthcare team Access to services in your community The Canadian Cancer Society s Community Services Locator helps cancer patients and their families find the services and programs they need in their community Learn More What is a risk factor Cancer risk refers to a person s chance of developing cancer A risk factor is any substance or condition that increases the risk of developing cancer There are very few cancers that have a single known cause Most cancers seem to be the result of a complex mix of many risk factors These risk factors may play different roles in starting cancer and helping it grow Some risk factors include heredity genetics lifestyle choices and exposure to cancer causing substances carcinogens in the environment In general the more often and the longer the exposure to a risk factor the greater the chance that cancer will develop It can take many years for cancer to develop after exposure to a risk factor Cancer usually develops after exposure to many risk factors over time People may be exposed to several risk factors in the course of their daily lives Some people have a higher risk of developing cancer because of certain risk factors Even if a person has one or more risk factors it is impossible to know exactly how much these factors may contribute to developing cancer later in life People at low risk may get cancer while people at high risk may not get cancer Low risk does not mean that a person will not get cancer It means that there is less chance of getting cancer High risk means that the chances of getting cancer may be greater but it does not mean that cancer will develop It isn t always clear why one person gets cancer and another doesn t Reviewing the scientific evidence on risks Over the years researchers have developed a better understanding of how cancers develop and grow Researchers look at all the scientific information to determine whether a substance causes or could cause cancer Scientists carefully review evidence from studies done in people and in the laboratory to determine whether a substance may increase the risk of cancer Scientists usually look at 3 things to determine if something is a risk factor for cancer How much how often and under what circumstances people

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/what-is-a-risk-factor/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • How to reduce cancer risk - Canadian Cancer Society
    Get involved Support us Make a personal donation Become a corporate supporter Leave a legacy Create a personal fundraising page Sponsor a participant Create a wedding fund Buy a lottery ticket Buy a luminary Buy daffodil mittens How your donations help Funding research Events and Participation Find an event near you Bark For Life Relay For Life Daffodil Month Curl For Cancer Face Off Against Cancer Fundraise for Life Harvest of Hope Jail N Bail Online and door to door canvassing Golf Fore the Cure Awareness weeks and months Hold your own event Volunteering Why volunteer Ways to volunteer Volunteer opportunities Take action What we are doing Asbestos Drug shortages Indoor tanning Vote for Health Tobacco control Compassionate care leave Cosmetic pesticides Success stories What you can do Donate Recently viewed pages How to reduce cancer risk What is a risk factor Canadian Cancer Statistics publication Cancer statistics at a glance What is cancer If you re a caregiver Helping someone with cancer Advanced cancer Life after cancer Living with cancer Select the text below and copy the link A A A You are here Cancer information Cancer 101 How to reduce cancer risk What is cancer Cancer statistics at a glance Canadian Cancer Statistics publication What is a risk factor How to reduce cancer risk Cancer research Glossary She knew that indoor tanning could pose serious health risks and this motivated her to push for a tan free prom at her school Read Kathleen s story Links to help you Our research How we can help Relay For Life Resource Publications Interactive prevention tool Questions to ask your healthcare team Clinical trial discovery improves quality of life A clinical trial led by the Society s NCIC Clinical Trials group found that men with prostate cancer who are treated with intermittent courses of hormone therapy live as long as those receiving continuous therapy Learn More How to reduce cancer risk There are many known risk factors for cancer It has been estimated that smoking is responsible for 30 of all cancer deaths and that one third of cancers can be linked to diet obesity and lack of exercise Risk reduction is taking action to lower one s risk of developing cancer Risk can be increased or decreased by lifestyle choices and the kind of environment a person lives and works in About half of all cancers can be prevented through healthy living and policies that protect the public Reducing your risk To help reduce your risk of developing cancer follow these general steps Live well Make healthy choices Be a non smoker and avoid second hand smoke Keep a healthy body weight Be active and eat well Know the risks of alcohol The less you drink the more you reduce your risk Protect your skin Be safe in the sun and don t use tanning beds or lamps Get enough vitamin D from the sun supplements and your diet Be aware Look after yourself Know your body and watch for

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/how-to-reduce-cancer-risk/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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  • Cancer research - Canadian Cancer Society
    that involves collecting examining and analyzing information to improve our knowledge and understanding of how normal cells become cancerous Research has shown that cancer is a very complex disease but researchers are closer than ever before to fully understanding many types of cancer As our knowledge of cancer continues to grow there will be even greater progress in cancer treatment Cancer treatment is based on scientific evidence which means it has been well tested in the laboratory and in groups of people A person with cancer may want to consider taking part in a clinical trial Clinical trials are research studies that test new ways to prevent detect treat or manage cancer Canada is an international leader in conducting clinical trials Thanks to gains in knowledge made by researchers here in Canada and around the world we are making great progress against cancer We are moving toward the day when some cancers will be curable and some cancers will be managed like chronic diseases just as diabetes and asthma are today Understanding the research process When we think about progress against cancer it is important to recognize that science is a step by step process where new discoveries often build on previous research studies Cancer research is a time consuming and expensive undertaking it can take years for researchers to complete a single study Each year hundreds of researchers working in hospitals research centres and other academic institutions across Canada apply for funds to support their work through the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute or other research focused organizations Applications for research funding undergo a strict review process that has been carefully designed to make sure only excellent research receives funding Researchers seek support for a variety of cancer research projects from basic laboratory research to clinical trials involving cancer prevention population health cancer treatment and quality of life Cancer research covers a wide range of activities and aspects of scientific study Some types of cancer research are discussed below Basic cancer research Basic cancer research takes place in the laboratory where scientists try to understand cancer at its deepest most fundamental level Most of this fundamental research takes place using cells grown in the laboratory or model organisms of disease such as specially developed mouse strains Understanding the basic processes of a cell may uncover answers about how normal cells become cancerous Researchers are doing a variety of basic studies including understanding how cell division and cell death are controlled discovering what makes cancer cells spread metastasize to other areas of the body looking for substances or markers that can be found in the bodies of people with cancer identifying unique characteristics of cancer cells to design new treatments with fewer side effects finding out why certain cancer cells and tumours become resistant to treatment looking at the genetic basis of different cancers and how each person s unique genetic profile can make them more vulnerable to cancer or provide insights on the most effective treatments for their particular

    Original URL path: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-101/cancer-research/?region=ab (2014-10-09)
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