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  • Sugar industry's secret documents echo tobacco tactics - Health - CBC News
    Thanks to friendly sources who alerted us a progressive approach to research by the Digest and persistence on our part we were able to persuade them to cancel the story the document reports We did it in two stages We failed in our initial conversations but succeeded when we took our case to the editor in chief Our telegraph to him is included in your folders and might be helpful should you be confronted by criticism Sugar can be the willpower you need to undereat a vintage advertisement proclaimed Mother Jones The documents Couzens found in that cardboard box also reveal that the Sugar Association was busy trying to block dietary guidelines that would recommend limits on sugar consumption At the time the US Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs headed by Senator George McGovern had released Dietary Goals for the United States which recommended that Americans should reduce their sugar intake by 40 per cent The Sugar Association had been warned by a committee insider that the final conclusions would hang sugar the association s president reported to the board in 1977 And now that the committee s report had been released the results certainly bear this prediction out he added But the lobby group had a plan The McGovern Report has to be neutralized that document reports assuring the members that the Sugar Association would fight back because the consequences of losing this battle and permitting dietary goals to become a basic reference are too grave to be taken lightly Sugar industry committed to sucrose consumption When Couzens approached the sugar industry for comment she was told the documents were ancient history They gave a comment like that was in the past and does not reflect the mission of the sugar association currently she said But then she found one more document an internal Sugar Association e newsletter from August 2003 that announced the Sugar Association is committed to the protection and promotion of sucrose consumption Any disparagement of sugar will be met with forceful strategic public comments and the supporting science It s very very difficult to find those kinds of documents so it was a real treasure Marion Nestle Couzens said that document showed the sugar industry is still very active in nominating scientists to serve on the dietary guidelines advisory committee and it is still publishing research through connections with the World Sugar Research Organization based in London These scientific reviews that are published by the sugar industry are still considered in the evidence review for the dietary guidelines so they re still serving to balance out the evidence she said Armed with all of these documents Couzens next challenge was to make them public somehow She sought out author Gary Taubes an American science writer who has reported extensively on the health effects of sugar He listened to her story and offered to help her get the documents published in the independent news magazine Mother Jones under the provocative title Big Sugar

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/03/08/f-vp-crowe-big-sugar.html (2013-06-03)
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  • CBC.ca - Interactive: Map of the human brain
    Map of the human brain A region by region exploration of how the brain functions CBC News Last Updated Dec 6 2012 Story Social Media Share Tools Report Typo Send Feedback End of Story Social Media Rob Ford scandal shakes Toronto Queen Elizabeth s coronation CBC Global Footer CBC ca Aboriginal Books Contests Digital Archives Documentaries Kids Kids CBC Preschool Kids CBC Wonder World Music News Parents Program Guide Radio

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/brain/ (2013-06-03)
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  • Needed: New approaches to defuse 'suicide contagion' among teens - Canada - CBC News
    has been glorified so then the kid who s at risk says Geez if I kill myself people will say nice things about me Many schools now have crisis intervention teams to help kids cope with another student s suicide Cheung points out But she says more has to be done in terms of prevention for example by linking schools to medical professionals who can help those who are at risk of suicide find the proper treatment We need to intervene and identify kids that are at risk to prevent more suicides from happening says Cheung I think the media play a huge role in controlling that and how the message gets across to the kids The language of suicide At the Vanier Institute Spinks says that part of the solution is changing some of the terminology pertaining to suicide For example by saying someone committed suicide we criminalize the act she says and make it the sole responsibility of the person s immediate family On the other hand by saying someone was successful at suicide we trivialize it she adds Spinks prefers the expression completing suicide because it looks at the problem holistically where death is but the last stage of a longer process of mental stress or illness If we talk about someone having completed suicide that means we ve missed the signs and the cues and the opportunities as a community and a society to support that individual and their family to avoid or prevent suicide says Spinks Colman says that for all the sensitivity around the handling of suicide it is imperative to keep talking about it We want to create a culture whether that s in our schools at home our communities where people feel comfortable talking about mental health and especially children feel comfortable seeking help coming forward if they re struggling with their mental health We should talk about suicide but we should be careful Share Tools Report Typo Send Feedback Regions British Columbia Kamloops Calgary Edmonton Saskatchewan Saskatoon Manitoba Thunder Bay Sudbury Windsor Kitchener Waterloo Hamilton Toronto Ottawa Montreal New Brunswick Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia Newfoundland Labrador North Stay Connected with CBC News Mobile Facebook Podcasts Twitter Alerts Newsletter Big Box Advertisement Top News Headlines Canadian Revenue Agency mails private records to wrong person The federal privacy commissioner is investigating the Canada Revenue Agency after it mailed confidential financial records on other taxpayers to a B C woman and failed to get them back when she tried to return the package more Can anyone take on top 3 telecom companies Some telecom analysts question whether it s at all possible for a new national competitor to go head to head against the incumbent carriers and carve out their own slice of the Canadian telecom pie more China poultry plant fire kills at least 119 A massive fire breaks out at a poultry plant in northeastern China trapping workers inside a cluttered slaughterhouse and killing at least 119 people more Don Pittis

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2013/05/22/f-suicide-contagion-prevention.html (2013-06-03)
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  • Chris Hadfield's next mission: Intensive rehab - Health - CBC News
    an astronaut in 2012 after nearly 29 years with the Canadian Space Agency Intensive rehab Thirsk said it took about a day before he felt comfortable walking without someone supporting his elbow Two weeks later he was steady enough for his flight surgeon to return his car keys Thirsk remembers the very intensive rehab program that began as soon as he got back to help build up muscle mass and strength I d say within six weeks my muscles were back to their pre flight status Bones however take a little bit longer Chris Hadfield sings goodbye to ISS with Space Oddity cover Watch highlights of Hadfield s mission It probably took about a year for my bone calcium level to return to pre flight levels says Thirsk The rule of thumb is for every month in space it takes two months for the bones to recover Most of the effects of weightless are reversible Thirsk said in an interview Monday but other potential effects of spaceflight on the human body are less certain We are exposed to higher levels of radiation in space than we are on the surface of the planet so what that means is that potentially in the future we could suffer genetic mutations and cataracts of the lenses in the eye and also of course cancer Thirsk said We still haven t flown enough people in space to know precisely what are the types of radiation related illnesses we should be watching out for but with time we ll eventually be able to monitor that better Psychological effects As much as there are the physical effects of long duration spaceflight Thirsk also sees a need to consider the mental and emotional well being of an astronaut after the return to Earth I think it s important from a psychological point of view to try to acclimate back to Earth as quickly as possible Read about what it s like to live on the International Space Station In addition to physiological changes in the body there is psychological changes as well Hadfield has just gone through a mountain top experience for five months in space and now he has to revert back to functioning as a ground based astronaut as a husband as a father as a neighbour and that will take a little bit of time to do Thirsk suggests Hadfield take time to relax and start to establish those human relationships again and that will help the next year With files from CBC News Share Tools Report Typo Send Feedback Stay Connected with CBC News Mobile Facebook Podcasts Twitter Alerts Newsletter Big Box Advertisement Top News Headlines Canadian Revenue Agency mails private records to wrong person The federal privacy commissioner is investigating the Canada Revenue Agency after it mailed confidential financial records on other taxpayers to a B C woman and failed to get them back when she tried to return the package more Can anyone take on top 3 telecom companies Some telecom

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/05/13/f-chris-hadfield-human-body-space-effects.html (2013-06-03)
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  • Gluten-free not just a fad for some - Health - CBC News
    all in all said Anca For anyone eating gluten free Anca recommends eating a variety of healthy carbohydrates like quinoa flax sorghum millet and teff Potential future treatments Dr Rashid says it isn t yet clear why the prevalence of celiac disease and non celiac gluten sensitivity seem to be increasing All autoimmune disorders and allergies are on the rise celiac disease is just one of them But a number of therapies for gluten related disorders are already in clinical trials Larazotide acetate is the pill attracting the most attention the theory is that it works by preventing gluten from entering the lining of the small intestine One therapy in development involves using enzymes to break gluten into smaller non toxic parts Another is thought to work by attaching a chemical to gluten that makes it too big to be absorbed during digestion The biotechnology company ImmusanT is developing a vaccine that will increase tolerance to gluten in people with celiac disease Dr Rashid says these options may be on the market within five to 10 years But the treatments won t reverse celiac disease or gluten sensitivity It seems that the cure will probably not be that one can eat everything said Dr Rashid Rather treatment will protect people from small quantities of gluten Even without a cure being gluten free is becoming easier and more affordable There are more gluten free products on the market manufacturers are labeling food that contains gluten and people with celiac disease are eligible for a gluten free tax breaks Going gluten free is hard at first but can lead to delicious and healthy eating One of the ancillary benefits of a gluten free diet is that it makes you really think about what you re eating said Yeh You re forced to discover new foods For Yeh the initial difficulty of changing her lifestyle has been worth it I had been living with this brain fog for the past number of years and I didn t realize that I did until it was sort of lifted away from me My pain went away She is still playing her electric violin Share Tools Report Typo Send Feedback Stay Connected with CBC News Mobile Facebook Podcasts Twitter Alerts Newsletter Big Box Advertisement Top News Headlines Canadian Revenue Agency mails private records to wrong person The federal privacy commissioner is investigating the Canada Revenue Agency after it mailed confidential financial records on other taxpayers to a B C woman and failed to get them back when she tried to return the package more Can anyone take on top 3 telecom companies Some telecom analysts question whether it s at all possible for a new national competitor to go head to head against the incumbent carriers and carve out their own slice of the Canadian telecom pie more China poultry plant fire kills at least 119 A massive fire breaks out at a poultry plant in northeastern China trapping workers inside a cluttered slaughterhouse and killing

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/04/30/celiac-gluten.html (2013-06-03)
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  • Inside a nurse’s world: where stress is status quo - CBC News
    workers are integral to any hospital and make up a third of Canada s health care workforce but we rarely hear from them CBC s the fifth estate went directly to registered nurses to get their perspective on the quality of care in Canada s hospitals in a cross country survey What we heard was startling Nearly 40 per cent told us they feel burnt out to a high degree Research shows nurse burnout is associated with risks to patient safety Nurses we heard from also expressed fear that stress is leading to mistakes Read dozens of stories below from nurses working in hospitals across Canada To protect their identity CBC only identifies their province unit type and age category Each box represents responses categorized by the levels of burnout as compared to the nurse s patient safety concerns Click the boxes to read their stories CBC s the fifth estate conducted an online survey of registered nurses that was sent out through nursing associations and unions across the country About 4 500 registered nurses from 257 hospitals responded Photos Evan Mitsui CBC Global Footer CBC ca Aboriginal Books Contests Digital Archives Documentaries Kids Kids CBC Preschool Kids CBC Wonder

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/features/ratemyhospital/nurse-survey-results/ (2013-06-03)
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  • Food cravings engineered by industry - Health - CBC News
    hits certain areas of the oral surface improving the melt in mouth quality while simultaneously reserving enough space in the mouth for the aroma to enrich the sensorial experience the press release announced It s a clue to understanding why chocolates tend to be round It seems consumers don t enjoy a piece of chocolate as much if it has sharp edges Absolutely we re looking for chocolate to be comforting to be a really pleasant lovely experience in the mouth Chris Lukehurst said Melt is a very soft soft experience and if it s got sharp corners you re really spoiling that and setting the consumer on edge slightly before they get the melt Much better if it s nicely rounded and they re already comforted and enjoying it first And whatever happens on the tongue triggers a response in the brain That s why neuroscience is the next frontier for the food industry Francis McGlone was a pioneer when he left academia to work for Unilever one of the world s largest food companies back in 1994 I think I was the leading edge of something which I think is going to become far more prominent McGlone said After more than a decade of industry research he s back in academia but he remembers his time in the food industry fondly As a basic neuroscientist I was able to look at the mechanisms that drove preference for various types of food he said What are those drivers of food preference in McGlone s opinion His answer sounded familiar I am afraid we find high fat high sugar high salt foods very appealing he said Salt sugar and fat are the three pillars of the processed food industry Michael Moss said And while the industry hates the world addiction more than any other word the fact of the matter is their research has shown them that when they hit the very perfect amounts of each of those ingredients they will have us buy more eat more When Moss began working on his investigation into the science of food processing he was sceptical of concept of food addiction Until I spent some time with the top scientists in the U S who say that yes for some people the most highly loaded salty sugary fatty foods are every bit as addictive as some narcotics he said Francis McGlone made a similar point in a television program for the BBC when he put a British chef into a functional magnetic resonance imaging machine an fMRI fed him chili and took images of his brain which showed how the burn from the chili peppers triggered the release of endorphins The consequence of that low level of pain is that it floods the brain with its own natural opiates so you can see another way of kicking up a pleasure system McGlone said But many ingredients in processed food have nothing to do with taste They re there to reproduce a certain texture to control the moisture level to keep the various ingredients from separating and spoiling during the months that they will sit on the shelves Food companies seek the perfect spot of just enough sugar to create what they call the bliss point says author Michael Moss Naum Kazhdan via Pulitzer Prize Board Associated Press New York Times Absolutely that s essential to the processed food industry that their food be able to remain in a warehouse in shipping and then in the grocery story for weeks or months at a time Moss said To mask the bitterness or sourness that the formulations can cause the food industry uses flavour enhancers invisible ingredients that trick the brain into tasting something that isn t there and not tasting something that is there Ingredients like that are kind of bundled under what may seem like relatively innocuous labels like natural flavours or even artificial flavours when truly they are much more surprising when consumers really understand what it is Bruce Bradley the former food industry executive said There s tremendous amounts of money spent behind creating tastes and smells that feel real but in reality are completely artificial These products are designed to keep you coming back to eat more and more and more They re trying to increase their share of your stomach Bruce Bradley Because without flavour enhancement no one would eat it It would taste horrible you d want to spit it out Bradley said Michael Moss was treated to a special taste test while researching his book Kellogg invited me into their R D department and prepared for me special versions of their iconic products without any salt in them at all And I have to tell you it was a God awful experience tasting those things Normally I can eat Cheez Its crackers all day long but the Cheez Its without the salt I couldn t even swallow them They stuck to the roof of my mouth The real impressive moment was when I turned to the cereal which without salt tasted like metal One of the miracle things that salt adds to processed foods it will cover up some of the off notes that are inherent to the food processing systems that they rely on Bruce Bradley says all of that processing takes food to a different place We re not talking about food actually being real anymore It s synthetic completely contrived and created and there s so many problems about that because our bodies are tricked and when our bodies are tricked repeatedly dramatic things can happen like weight gain or endocrine disruption diabetes and hypertension he said What about the scientists who created these products Moss says some of them are having second thoughts about their popular creations A number of the people I talked to invented these icons really in a more innocent era when our dependence on processed foods was much less than it is now And over time they ve come

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/03/05/f-vp-crowe-food-addiction.html (2013-06-03)
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  • Scientists explore the illusion of memory - Health - CBC News
    first scientific paper about interfering with memory more than a decade ago Back then he faced many skeptics and he was surprised at the hostile the reaction Definitely he said There was a huge shock and backlash After years of scientific rigour and argument I did manage to inspire a lot of the younger generation to at least test it So very quickly after that it had been shown across species across tasks using different kinds of tools so at that point it became impossible for anyone to say this can t be real I mean it has to real they find it in snails they find it in humans they find it in dogs Understanding memory could lead to treatments Understanding the neurochemical process of memory opens up possibilities for therapy in situations where memory is causing pain People think that post traumatic stress disorder might be susceptible to treatments of this kind No one has shown this in a convincing way But this is certainly an interesting avenue of investigation Kandel said There are many disorders of memory Obviously age related memory loss Alzheimer s disease schizophrenia working memory loss PTSD which is a hyperactivity of memory if you will he explained Nader believes memory disruption could be helpful in a wide range of psychiatric disorders He is collaborating with other researchers on drug addiction and others are investigating the implications for obsessive compulsive disorder OCD So if you imagine OCD what happens over time is somebody becomes more and more obsessive in a certain compulsion then the neurons that contribute and maintain that behavior they re going to undergo a reconsolidation process Nader says So every time they have another episode that circuit controlling the compulsion is going to have to be hypothetically unstored and then restored And so if you had a tool just to block that restorage process then in theory what should happen is you should be able to make somebody better and go from their compulsive behavior to something relatively more normal Early research on post traumatic stress disorder has been encouraging Nader said In studies subjects have been asked to remember the trauma and then take a drug that has been shown to block memory reconsolidation and that seems to reduce the strength of the traumatic memory to non PTSD levels Researchers finding other ways to change memory Other research has suggested that it might even be possible to block the memory reconsolidation without drugs by asking a person to remember something and then in those moments of remembering replace the old memory with new information The memory becomes unstored and during that time you just tell them a different kind of information is correct and you allow time for that other information to be restored It s almost as if the new information can in some cases replace the old information Nader said It s great theoretically because you don t have to give anyone any kind of a drug he

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2013/01/03/health-inside-your-brain-memory-illusion.html (2013-06-03)
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