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  • Political Criticism Acceptable according to Broadcast Code, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    discussion program hosted by Mario Dumont On October 20 2011 Dumont s guest was Martin Pelletier They talked about the upcoming Liberal Party convention Pelletier characterized Liberal supporters as translations lobotomized brainless idiots and losers Dumont pointed out that people are entitled to their political opinions and suggested that people vote Liberal because they fear Quebec separation Pelletier responded to that suggestion with translation Immigrants Anglos and people on life support A listener complained that Pelletier had labelled immigrants anglophones and the elderly as lobotomized brainless idiots and losers and that such racist opinions should not be broadcast The CBSC Quebec Panel members disagreed on whether Pelletier s two comments were in fact linked but either way they all concluded that the comments were not abusive or unduly discriminatory on the basis of nationality ethnicity or age under the Human Rights Clauses of the CAB Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code The Panel considered the statements legitimate expressions of opinion on a political topic The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/political-criticism-acceptable-according-to-broadcast-code-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Public Affairs Discussion Must Accurately Distinguish between “Free” and "Subsidized”, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    because the host acknowledged the error in a subsequent broadcast The Source is a public affairs discussion program On the July 4 2011 episode host Ezra Levant had as his guest Sun Media journalist blogger Kathryn Marshall to talk about public funding for the arts Both Levant and Marshall objected to taxpayer money going to arts programs and they specifically talked about a program in Edmonton that provides live work space for artists called Arts Habitat Levant repeatedly referred to the program as free housing for artists Marshall used the word subsidized most of the time but did use the word free on one occasion Arts Habitat is in fact housing subsidized by the municipal and provincial governments of Edmonton and Alberta The CBSC received complaints from viewers who pointed out that artists are required to pay rent to live in Arts Habitat housing and that Sun News should not have been allowed to broadcast inaccurate information Sun News stated that on an episode of The Source broadcast two days later Levant had read an e mail from a viewer which made this distinction and he acknowledged his error The CBSC s National Specialty Services Panel concluded that Sun News Network was entitled to broadcast criticisms of public funding for arts programs but that those criticisms must be based on accurate information Sun News violated Clause 6 of the CAB Code of Ethics for referring to Arts Habitat as free housing when it is in fact subsidized housing but it respected Article 7 of the Radio Television Digital News Association s Code of Ethics by correcting the error The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/public-affairs-discussion-must-accurately-distinguish-between-free-and-subsidized-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Contest Segment Did Not Promote Violence against Animals, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    the Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics or Violence Code The Evil that People Do contest is a recurring segment on Htz FM s morning show Listeners call in to tell stories about mean things they have done and the hosts award a prize to the best one On August 26 2011 a caller named Bob told a story about how he fed hits of acid to his neighbour s cat as an act of revenge for something he thought the neighbour had done He noted that he had done this when he was younger and foolish The hosts and caller laughed about the situation but the caller said that the cat had been unharmed The hosts also repeatedly stated that they did not condone hurting animals and they did not award the prize to this caller A listener complained to the CBSC that the conversation promoted cruelty to animals The station argued that the hosts had not condoned the act and had not awarded the prize to the caller The CBSC s Ontario Regional Panel examined the complaint under Clause 9 a of the CAB Code of Ethics which prohibits the promotion sanction or glamorization of violence on radio and Article 9 1 of the CAB Violence Code which makes that same prohibition with specific reference to animals The Panel found no breach of those Code provisions because the hosts did not condone the actions and did not award the prize to that caller The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/contest-segment-did-not-promote-violence-against-animals-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Promo Making Light of Violent Act Violated Broadcast Code, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    concluded that the promo violated Article 1 1 of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Violence Code The 10 second promo aired on August 6 2011 at 6 46 pm Tosh O is an American comedy program in which host Daniel Tosh shows video clips from YouTube and similar websites and makes fun of them In the promo Tosh said Here s something I m sure we ve all wanted to do He then showed a clip of a car driving through a crowd of people on bicycles A viewer complained that it was inappropriate to derive amusement from this scenario because people might have been seriously hurt The clip was apparently of an incident that had occurred in Brazil when a car drove through a group of cyclists in February 2011 According to reports there were no fatalities but as many as 40 were injured The Comedy Network argued that the promo contained irreverent humour and that Tosh O s producers would not have been allowed to show a clip involving fatalities The CBSC s National Specialty Services Panel examined the complaint under Article 1 1 of the CAB Violence Code which states that programming shall not sanction promote or glamorize violence The Panel found that the promo s light hearted treatment of the serious incident particularly the inclusion of Tosh s comment had the effect of validating and supporting the action The promo therefore violated the Code The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay television services across Canada are members of the

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/promo-making-light-of-violent-act-violated-broadcast-code-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Jokes about Murders Breached Broadcast Code, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    morning show on rock radio station The Edge On September 15 2011 the hosts talked about the murders of two people that had occurred in Mexico The people were murdered allegedly because they had posted negative comments on social media websites about Mexican drug gangs The two people had been found disemboweled and hanging from a bridge The hosts provided gory details about the state of the bodies and then joked about how the Facebook status of the people would be disemboweled or dripping blood from the bridge They also made other jokes about the situation A listener complained that the segment was entirely repugnant and disgusting The station acknowledged that the discussion was graphic and unpleasant but stated that the hosts were trying to bring levity to the subject The CBSC s Ontario Regional Panel examined the complaint under Clause 9 a of the CAB Code of Ethics which prohibits gratuitous violence in any form on radio and Clause 6 which requires the proper presentation of all opinion and comment The Panel found violations of both clauses because the gruesome details provided about the state of the bodies was entirely unnecessary to the discussion particularly given the flippant tone with which those descriptions were provided The Panel also stated that the constant laughter on the part of the hosts and the multiple jokes about the murder victims demonstrated extreme insensitivity and went beyond mere poor taste in this discussion about a real incident relating to a serious problem in Mexico The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/jokes-about-murders-breached-broadcast-code-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Comments about Redheads Did Not Violate Code, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    attractive male redheads freak me out and if we could phase out all the male male gingers that would be great He also named a few male celebrity redheads that one could get rid of The CBSC received a complaint from a listener who felt that the comments were unacceptable because they targeted a specific group The station suggested that the comments were not intended as an attack on anyone The CBSC s Prairie Regional Panel examined the complaint under the CAB Code of Ethics It noted that hair colour is not a category of identifiable groups under the Human Rights clause of the Code but that it could nevertheless examine the complaint under the clause that requires the fair and proper presentation of opinion While the Panel acknowledged that it was in poor taste to disparage any group on the airwaves it concluded that there was no breach of the Code because the comments were not said in a particularly harsh nasty or mean spirited way The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/comments-about-redheads-did-not-violate-code-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Fair and Balanced Treatment of Student Protest in Public Affairs Show, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    The two hosts of Face face St phane Gendron and Caroline Proulx interviewed the spokesperson from Coalition large de l Association pour une solidarit syndicale tudiante CLASSE Gabriel Nadeau Dubois on March 22 2012 Nadeau Dubois explained his group s opposition to the Quebec government s decision to raise tuition fees for college and university students Gendron and Proulx stated their disagreement with his position and challenged Nadeau Dubois on his views The CBSC received a total of 914 complaints about the broadcast mostly due to a campaign launched on social media websites The complainants alleged that the hosts had been disrespectful towards Nadeau Dubois because they continually interrupted him and made disparaging comments about the student movement V pointed out that the program is designed to generate discussion and debate The CBSC s Quebec Regional Panel examined the complaints under Clauses 6 and 7 of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics Clause 6 requires the full fair and proper presentation of all comments and opinions and Clause 7 requires a balanced presentation of controversial public issues The Panel found no violations of those clauses because the hosts were entitled to state their opinions on the subject of the student protests and they gave Nadeau Dubois the opportunity to state his views Indeed it was Nadeau Dubois who frequently interrupted the hosts before they had formulated their questions Although the hosts demonstrated some impatience towards Nadeau Dubois they were not aggressive or insulting towards him The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/fair-and-balanced-treatment-of-student-protest-in-public-affairs-show-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Humorous Comments in Morning Show Violate Broadcast Standards, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    in which the hosts comment on unusual news stories The CBSC s Ontario Regional Panel concluded that a graphic discussion about a woman who had skinned a cat in order to make a fur costume was gratuitous contrary to Clause 9 a of the CAB Code of Ethics and glamorized violence contrary to Article 9 1 of the CAB Violence Code Other conversations about news stories with sexual elements were not so explicit as to constitute a breach of the Code A story about the mistreatment of autistic children did not violate any Code provisions In the second decision the CBSC examined multiple segments from different broadcast dates The Ontario Panel concluded that jokes about Jesus Christ s sex life violated the CAB Equitable Portrayal Code and a reference to all women as sluts breached both that Code and the CAB Code of Ethics Other comments about women s body parts and the use of the word gay to mean stupid did not violate those Codes In the third decision the CBSC examined a segment entitled Wha Happened in which callers recount stories of unusual things that have happened to them and the hosts award a prize for the best one A caller explained how he had hit a woman with his truck the previous night The woman was not fatally injured and the man was not charged with any offence The caller and hosts laughed about the situation The Ontario Panel concluded that the segment did not promote sanction or glamorize the act The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/humorous-comments-in-morning-show-violate-broadcast-standards-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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