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  • Spanish-Language Insult Violates Broadcast Code - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics The Source is a public affairs talk program hosted by Ezra Levant On the December 22 2011 episode during his opening monologue he criticized the Chiquita Banana company for boycotting oil from the Alberta oilsands He referred to a letter that Chiquita had sent which explained the company s position Levant called the Chiquita executive who had written the letter a liar At the end of his monologue he told the Chiquita executive to chinga tu madre a Spanish language insult that translates to f k your mother The CBSC received numerous complaints about the broadcast Viewers complained that it was inappropriate for Levant to use such a nasty insult towards a named individual Sun News argued that the word chingar can have many different meanings and even provided the CBSC with a subsequent broadcast of The Source during which Levant discussed the word with a native Spanish speaker During that episode Levant admitted he was trying to be offensive The CBSC s National Specialty Services Panel concluded that the context of Levant s use of the phrase chinga tu madre on December 22 was clearly intended to insult an identified person The use of coarse language to insult people in that manner regardless of which language used constitutes a breach of Clause 6 of the CAB Code of Ethics The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay television services across Canada are members of the Council 30 All CBSC decisions Codes links to members and other

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/spanish-language-insult-violates-broadcast-code/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Discussion about Race Relations & Riots in England Was Acceptable, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics or Equitable Portrayal Code The episode of the public affairs program was originally broadcast on August 9 2011 and rebroadcast on August 13 Lilley and guest commentator Michael Coren talked about the riots that were then occurring in and around London England Coren argued that the riots were not motivated by poverty as some rioters claimed but rather were related to the gang culture in predominantly black neighbourhoods When Lilley asked Coren about the fact that the rioters were communicating amongst themselves via digital mobile devices Coren responded It s not about BlackBerrys It s about black thugs The CBSC received a number of complaints about Coren s black thugs comment and his overall view that the riots were caused by black culture Sun News argued that Coren was simply providing his opinion on a controversial political issue The CBSC s National Specialty Services Panel examined the complaints under various provisions of the CAB Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code The majority of the Panel concluded that the discussion dealt with political and social issues and did not constitute abusive or unduly discriminatory comments about black people in general nor did it contain unduly negative portrayals of that group There were therefore no violations of any Code provisions One adjudicator dissented because she felt that Coren had unfairly attributed all the blame for the riots to the black community The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay television services across Canada are members of the Council 30 All CBSC

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/discussion-about-race-relations-riots-in-england-was-acceptable-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Comments about Welfare Recipients Did Not Violate Code - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    generalizations about that group The CBSC found no violations of any broadcast Codes On May 2 2011 Maurais interviewed a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives about legislation that had just been passed in that state which prohibits welfare recipients from spending their benefits on unnecessary purchases Maurais conducted the interview in English and then his co host J C Ouellet summarized in French for listeners Maurais and Ouellet also expressed their own opinions during the broadcast namely that they would like to see similar measures imposed in Quebec At some points they did not clearly distinguish between their translations of the politician s words and their own opinions After the interview Maurais took calls from listeners about the topic One caller complained about the anti social behaviour of welfare recipients The CBSC received a complaint from the Front commun des personnes assistées sociales du Québec which alleged that the broadcast contained misleading and discriminatory comments about welfare recipients The CBSC s Quebec Regional Panel concluded that the hosts could have made it more clear to listeners that they were adding comments of their own while summarizing those of their guest but those additions did not distort the overall message The Panel also found that the negative comments about welfare recipients focussed on those who abuse the welfare system and did not generalize about all recipients The Panel found no violation of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters Code of Ethics The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay television services across Canada are members

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/comments-about-welfare-recipients-did-not-violate-code/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Broadcast of Prank Telephone Call Requires Prior Consent, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    show was hosted by Kiah Tucker and Tara Jean Stevens The day after Halloween Tucker telephoned a dentist s office and talked to the receptionist He pretended that all of his teeth had fallen out after eating too much Halloween candy At one point he said I couldn t bite you but I could give you a serious suck The dentist s office sent a complaint to the CBSC It complained that the name of the dental practice and the voice of their receptionist had been broadcast without informing them or obtaining their permission They also alleged that Tucker had made an inappropriate sexual comment to the receptionist In its response letter the station apologized for offending the complainant but pointed out that the segment was meant to be humorous and no sexually explicit comments were made The CBSC s British Columbia Regional Panel examined the complaint under various provisions of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code The Panel concluded that the bite comment was not necessarily sexual but even if interpreted that way it was not sexually explicit under Clause 9 b of the CAB Code of Ethics The Panel also concluded that the broadcast did not violate the receptionist s privacy because her name was bleeped out but that the station should have obtained consent before broadcasting the segment The failure to obtain prior consent constituted an improper presentation of the content under Clause 6 of the CAB Code of Ethics The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/broadcast-of-prank-telephone-call-requires-prior-consent-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Derogatory Ethnic Term Unacceptable, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    On the February 10 2012 episode Kent spoke with a caller about a man who was planning a world record parachute jump The caller made the comment when he splats on the ground people will say Well it definitely wasn t Superman Kent then replied They ll say it was that famous chinaman Sum Dum Guy A listener complained that the word chinaman is racist offensive and unacceptable in the present day The radio station explained that the program originates in the United States but agreed that the word is unacceptable on Canadian airwaves and gave assurances that it would be more careful in the future Canadian stations are responsible for all material that they air regardless of its source The CBSC s Prairie Regional Panel examined the complaint under the Human Rights clauses of the CAB Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code which prohibits abusive or unduly discriminatory comment on the basis of race national or ethnic origin It also examined the complaint under Clause 9 b regarding Language and Terminology of the Equitable Portrayal Code which requires broadcasters to avoid the use of derogatory language in references to individuals or groups based on race national or ethnic origin The Panel concluded that the segment did not violate the Human Rights clauses because Kent did not actually make any negative comments about Chinese people The segment did however violate the Language and Terminology clause because chinaman has evolved to become an offensive and pejorative term The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/derogatory-ethnic-term-unacceptable-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Objectification of Persons of Small Stature is Unacceptable - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    people of small stature in an unduly discriminatory and negative manner contrary to the Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code RDS s sports magazine program 5 à 7 contains a segment entitled Laprise branché hosted by commentator Michel Laprise On November 15 2011 Laprise showed a videoclip which a viewer had sent to him of a man with dwarfism being used as a bowling ball by people of regular size Laprise joked that this bowling activity requires only translations a sheet of rubber oil a dwarf with a sense of humour and a single sister in law who is willing to date a dwarf just during the holiday season The Quebec Association of Persons of Short Stature complained to the CBSC about the harassing and degrading depiction of persons of short stature RDS pointed out that Laprise had apologized on air a week after the broadcast The CBSC s Quebec Regional Panel examined the complaint under the Human Rights Clauses of the CAB Code of Ethics and Equitable Portrayal Code as well as under the provisions of the Equitable Portrayal Code relating to negative portrayal stigmatization and victimization and degrading material The Panel concluded that the broadcast violated all of those Code provisions because the segment presented persons of small stature as mere objects of humour and ridicule The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay television services across Canada are members of the Council 30 All CBSC decisions Codes links to members and other web sites and related

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/objectification-of-persons-of-small-stature-is-unacceptable/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Inclusion of Irrelevant and Inaccurate Information in Report Violates Codes, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    the Canadian Association of Broadcasters CAB Code of Ethics and the Radio Television Digital News Association s RTDNA Code of Ethics The report was breaking news about a fire at a local tandoori restaurant The news anchor informed viewers that no one was injured and the cause of the fire had yet to be determined The anchor then mentioned that the restaurant had been in the news in the past due to a dispute between its owner and the owner of a similarly named restaurant in the same neighbourhood The report included video footage of separate interviews with the two restaurant owners about that dispute The complaint came from the owner of the damaged restaurant He complained that it was inappropriate that the report had mentioned the previous dispute because it had long been resolved and was irrelevant to the story about the fire The CBSC s British Columbia Regional Panel concluded that CTV British Columbia violated Clause 5 of the CAB Code of Ethics and Article 1 of the RTDNA Code of Ethics because it had inaccurately made it sound like the conflict between the two tandoori restaurant owners was ongoing The Panel also concluded that while the broadcaster had not violated anyone s privacy it had unfairly included irrelevant background information because the story about the restaurant name dispute was unrelated to the fire That element of the report violated Clause 6 of the CAB Code of Ethics The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services television stations and specialty and pay television services across Canada are members of

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/inclusion-of-irrelevant-and-inaccurate-information-in-report-violates-codes-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Coarse Language Requires Post-9:00 pm Time Slot & Viewer Advisories, Says Canadian Broadcast Standards Council - Canadian Broadcast Standards Council Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
    viewer advisories Le gala hommage Denise Filiatrault was a variety program which contained monologues songs and sketches to pay tribute to the Quebec actress director The program began at 8 30 pm It contained French swear words such as calice tabarnac chrisse and hostie There were no viewer advisories alerting the audience to this language The CBSC received a complaint from a viewer who was concerned that children could be exposed to the coarse language in the program In its reply to the complainant TVA mentioned one particular comedy sketch and pointed out that the coarse language helped to demonstrate the level of frustration of the characters The CBSC s Quebec Regional Panel examined the complaint under the Scheduling Clause 10 and Viewer Advisories Clause 11 provisions of the CAB Code of Ethics It noted that the CBSC has previously determined that a program beginning before 9 00 pm must respect the rules for pre 9 00 pm programming throughout its duration even if some of the scenes technically occur after 9 00 pm It also noted that the Quebec Panel has previously determined that the words used in the program should not be broadcast before 9 00 pm TVA thus had the choice of broadcasting the program after 9 00 pm with the coarse language or broadcasting it before that hour with the problematic language muted out TVA breached Clause 10 for broadcasting it before 9 00 pm It also breached Clause 11 for failing to provide any advisories during the program The CBSC was created in 1990 by Canada s private broadcasters to administer the codes of standards that they established for their industry The CBSC currently administers 7 codes which deal with ethics equitable portrayal violence news and journalistic independence Nearly 750 radio stations satellite radio services

    Original URL path: http://www.cbsc.ca/coarse-language-requires-post-900-pm-time-slot-viewer-advisories-says-canadian-broadcast-standards-council/ (2016-02-12)
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