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  • Archived Publications | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    a response to the complaint I want to develop an internal process for resolving complaints What is an internal dispute resolution process How to develop an internal dispute resolution process We are being considered for an employment equity audit Forward Plan for Notification I want to improve my workplace Where do I start How can I prevent discrimination in my workplace How can I resolve conflicts when they arise Where can I get help Organizations and Businesses Main Page Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications Archived Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Resources Main Page Breadcrumb trail Home Resources Publications Archived Publications Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications Archived Publications News Room Glossary Multimedia Quick Links I want to complain My employer obligations About us News Resources Listen Archived Publications Date modified Tuesday 26 03 2013 Download PDF The Medical Perspective on Environmental Sensitivities May 2007 Are you an employer or service provider Do you understand from a medical perspective why you need to accommodate individuals with environmental sensitivities Do you know what policies or guidelines you should implement to ensure your environment is safe for all This report summarizes scientific information

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/archived-publications?page=3 (2016-02-13)
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  • 15/12/2015 - Canadian Human Rights Commission commends TRC on final report and calls for action | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    when they arise Where can I get help Organizations and Businesses Main Page Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications Archived Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Resources Main Page Breadcrumb trail Home Resources News Room What s New 15 12 2015 Canadian Human Rights Commission commends TRC on final report and calls for action Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Quick Links I want to complain My employer obligations About us News Resources Listen 15 12 2015 Canadian Human Rights Commission commends TRC on final report and calls for action December 15 2015 Ottawa Ontario Canadian Human Rights Commission Marie Claude Landry Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission issues the following statement in light of the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada s final report The Canadian Human Rights Commission CHRC congratulates the Truth and Reconciliation Commission TRC on releasing its final report and its 94 recommendations All Canadians must acknowledge the dark chapter of residential schools in our country s collective history and the continuing impacts on First Nations Métis and Inuit people and communities Reconciliation must involve everyone Only through understanding and recognition can we ensure that this type of tragedy is never allowed to happen again The CHRC honours the courage of all survivors of the schools and their families We honour the keepers of the stories both told and untold And we have the deepest respect for the survivors and their families who came forward to shine a light on the devastating truth that had long been ignored It is now time for action We call on the Government of Canada to implement the TRC report s 94 recommendations And we call

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/canadian-human-rights-commission-commends-trc-final-report-and-calls-action (2016-02-13)
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  • 10/12/2015 - We must not let discrimination go unchecked in our communities | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    my workplace Where do I start How can I prevent discrimination in my workplace How can I resolve conflicts when they arise Where can I get help Organizations and Businesses Main Page Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications Archived Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Resources Main Page Breadcrumb trail Home Resources News Room What s New 10 12 2015 We must not let discrimination go unchecked in our communities Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Quick Links I want to complain My employer obligations About us News Resources Listen 10 12 2015 We must not let discrimination go unchecked in our communities On International Human Rights Day Marie Claude Landry Chief Commissioner of the Canadian Human Rights Commission CHRC issues the following statement On International Human Rights Day let s not ignore the difficult truth discrimination continues to exist in our own backyard Canadians have made it clear human rights for all must be treated as a priority in our society If we are to make meaningful change for Canadians living in vulnerable circumstances we must not only hold our decision makers accountable we must also demand better of ourselves We cannot let our guard down We cannot take our human rights for granted We must not let discrimination and prejudice go unchecked in our communities The Canadian Human Rights Commission applauds the recent launch of the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as a long awaited step in the right direction But an inquiry alone won t solve this deeply complicated issue It is going to require concrete action And it will require a renewed focus on trust collaboration responsibility and respect People in Canada living

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/10122015-we-must-not-let-discrimination-go-unchecked-our-communities (2016-02-13)
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  • Chief Commissioner Marie-Claude Landry speaks at the Assembly of First Nations Special Chiefs Assembly | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    upcoming Canadian Human Rights Tribunal decision could impact funding for child welfare services But it may also impact how the Government funds a whole range of services in First Nations communities Before I explain why I would like to tell you about the journey I have been on over the past nine months I was appointed the head of Canada s national human rights institution this past March Since then I have met with over 125 organizations representing vulnerable groups I met with them to find out what they expect from me and the Canadian Human Rights Commission One of the first of these meetings was with National Chief Bellegarde People were happy to share their opinions and ideas And I have heard them loud and clear We have already begun work to make the Commission the organization that people in Canada want us to be We will use our expertise to contribute to public policy and social change We will adapt our complaint processes to resolve issues fairly effectively and quickly We will adjust our processes to make it accessible to the people we are here to help In short we will put people first in everything we do every direction every action every decision This involves lending our voice to join others who speak out on behalf of people in vulnerable circumstances people who do not have a voice such as vulnerable children On the morning after the election I called on the government to repair the erosion of human rights in Canada I outlined the most pressing human issues facing Canada today I called for action to address the injustice and inequality that so many people in Canada continue to face Here are a few highlights I called on the government to convene a national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and develop a national action plan to ensure that all people in Canada have access to safe drinking water and adequate housing and to end the inequitable funding of child welfare services and schools on First Nations reserves Now I said that I believed we were at the dawn of a new era For the first time in history an Indigenous woman has been appointed Minister of Justice And many of the most pressing human rights issues facing Canada are among the top priorities outlined in her mandate letter I also think it is encouraging that a Prime Minister addressed the entire Assembly yesterday for the first time in well over a decade And that he made it clear that he will immediately move to turn his five campaign promises into action At the same time the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has raised public awareness and has challenged many to take a closer look at the racist attitudes that continue to exist in this country We all have a role to play in reconciliation I believe that many Canadians acknowledge the past and are ready for reconciliation Of course reconciliation must include a

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/chief-commissioner-marie-claude-landry-speaks-assembly-first-nations-special-chiefs-assembly (2016-02-13)
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  • 06/01/2016 - Chief Commissioner’s keynote address to the National Healthcare Labour & Employee Relations Forum | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    I say this because you are the only group of professionals who interact face to face with everyone in this country from cradle to grave You are in a position of privilege People trust you They drop their guard when they come to see you They share their problems their concerns their fears And you can bring about real meaningful change because you can give your most vulnerable patients a voice You can speak out on their behalf And together as healthcare professionals you have a powerful voice And you have credibility Let me give you an example When the Canadian government cut funding to healthcare for people claiming refugee status many saw this as discriminatory The Federal Court called it cruel and unusual We were failing people who had come to this country in the hope of finding freedom from persecution Healthcare professionals saw this and many spoke out against the cuts They brought this issue to the national discussion And their voices were heard They were able to raise the profile of this issue during the recent election campaign to the point that it was mentioned during the leaders debates And now the new government has announced that it will quickly reinstate full healthcare for refugees This is an example of tangible change brought about by the efforts of healthcare professionals perhaps by some of you in this very room This brings me back to my main message My hope is that you can lend your voices to raising awareness and improving the situation for other vulnerable members of society We all have an equal right to healthcare But we don t all have equal access I am certain that each of you can think of an example from your own experience when someone in need of help did not receive that care when the healthcare system failed a vulnerable member of your community There are many pressing human rights issues that I could share with you Today I want to focus on three of the most vulnerable groups in Canada Indigenous people transgender people and people with mental illness who end up in our prison system The persistent condition of disadvantage facing Indigenous people in Canada is among the most pressing human rights issues today If not the most pressing Chronic underfunding for basic services especially healthcare contributes to complex social problems The poverty that exists in many First Nations communities has been compared to conditions in Third World countries When looking at the numbers for Indigenous people in Canada the health indicators paint a stark picture of how inequality and discrimination can affect individual health Deeply entrenched undercurrents of racism compound the problem Racism sadly still exists in many corners of our society A recent study by the Wellesley Institute called First Peoples Second Class Treatment points to racism in the healthcare system as a major factor in substandard health among Indigenous people in Canada The study suggests Indigenous people feel discriminated against so often that

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/chief-commissioners-keynote-address-national-healthcare-labour-employee-relations-forum (2016-02-13)
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  • 29/07/2015 - CHRC welcomes a fifth part-time commissioner | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    an employment equity audit Forward Plan for Notification I want to improve my workplace Where do I start How can I prevent discrimination in my workplace How can I resolve conflicts when they arise Where can I get help Organizations and Businesses Main Page Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications Archived Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Resources Main Page Breadcrumb trail Home Resources News Room What s New 29 07 2015 CHRC welcomes a fifth part time commissioner Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Quick Links I want to complain My employer obligations About us News Resources Listen 29 07 2015 CHRC welcomes a fifth part time commissioner The Canadian Human Rights Commission CHRC is pleased to announce the appointment by Order in Council of a new part time commissioner Ms Peggy Warolin effective June 18 2015 Ms Warolin practices law at the private firm she founded in 2005 She has been a member of the Quebec Bar since 2004 and has extensive experience in litigation civil law administrative law family law and child protection She also works closely with the Aboriginal communities in her region Born in France Ms Warolin moved to Canada for her education and earned her Bachelor of Laws from Université Laval in 2003 Since that time she has served in many roles including President of the Bar of Abitibi Témiscamingue member of the General Council of the Quebec Bar and member of the Board of Directors of the Association des avocats et avocates de province regional lawyers association As a member of the Quebec Bar Ms Warolin has been involved in several missions to Inuit communities across Canada s North and co authored the report

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/chrc-welcomes-fifth-part-time-commissioner (2016-02-13)
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  • 03/07/2015 - CHRC welcomes two new part-time commissioners | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    considered for an employment equity audit Forward Plan for Notification I want to improve my workplace Where do I start How can I prevent discrimination in my workplace How can I resolve conflicts when they arise Where can I get help Organizations and Businesses Main Page Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications Archived Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Resources Main Page Breadcrumb trail Home Resources News Room What s New 03 07 2015 CHRC welcomes two new part time commissioners Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications News Room What s New News Releases Speeches Statements Glossary Multimedia Quick Links I want to complain My employer obligations About us News Resources Listen 03 07 2015 CHRC welcomes two new part time commissioners The Canadian Human Rights Commission CHRC is pleased to announce the appointments by Order in Council of two new part time commissioners Ms Sheila MacPherson effective April 30 2015 and Mr Kelly J Serbu effective May 28 2015 Sheila MacPherson is partner and the most senior civil litigator at Lawson Lundell LLP in Yellowknife She also serves as Law Clerk of the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories and is responsible for all child protection litigation on behalf of the Government of Nunavut Ms MacPherson has been recognized by Best Lawyers in Canada for her litigation in both family law and personal injury And she generously donates much of her personal time to various organizations in her community Kelly Serbu is partner at Serbu McGuigan Barristers and Solicitors in Halifax He has extensive experience in various areas of law including criminal law personal injury civil law as well as Charter law and human rights law at both the provincial and federal levels Mr Serbu has also served as Adjudicator for

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/chrc-welcomes-two-new-part-time-commissioners (2016-02-13)
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  • 27/05/2015 - Human rights accountability in national security practices: presentation to open caucus meeting of Liberal Senators | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    Human Rights Promotion Branch It was her Branch that produced the work we are going to discuss today I am going to share three messages with you First national security organizations cannot prove that they are not discriminating against people based on race religion or ethnic background That s because they do not collect statistics to show that there is no bias in how they operate Second national security organizations could be at risk of losing public trust as a result And third Parliament should require national security organizations to track their human rights performance and share the findings with Canadians The Canadian Human Rights Commission has a mandate to ensure equality of opportunity and freedom from discrimination We administer the Canadian Human Rights Act and audit federally regulated employers to ensure compliance with the Employment Equity Act We also receive complaints based on the 11 grounds of discrimination enumerated in the CHRA and promote Parliament s vision of an inclusive society through research policy development and outreach My remarks today will be confined to a discussion of the Canadian Human Rights Commission s 2011 Human Rights Impact Assessment for Security Measures and its Special Report to Parliament entitled Human Rights Accountability in National Security Practices Both publications are the product of a decade of research on national security and human rights in the Canadian context The Commission studied and analyzed court cases public inquiries social science research and the work of Parliamentary Committees And it consulted with organizations responsible for national security in Canada Four years have passed since this advice to Parliament was tabled We are not aware of any national security organization having put our recommendations into practice I believe our findings and recommendations are just as relevant today The Commission looked at the practices of organizations that provide national security to Canadians We learned that many security organizations have policies to prevent discriminatory practices We also discovered that few can demonstrate with hard numbers that their policies are followed This is because there are no hard numbers Let me explain National security organizations are not required to account publicly for how they meet their human rights obligations For example many organizations have policies to prevent discriminatory practices such as profiling But there are no processes in place to collect and analyze data to determine whether they discriminate on the basis of characteristics such as race ethnic origin or religion This brings me to my second point Without monitoring to transparently demonstrate that their human rights policies are effective national security organizations are vulnerable to criticism and the potential loss of public trust Public confidence in an organization depends in part on how well it can demonstrate that policies the public expects them to follow are followed As you know public confidence is critical It s easier to enforce laws and other measures that keep us safe when people support them And that support depends on public trust that rules are fairly and consistently applied As it

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/27052015-human-rights-accountability-national-security-practices-presentation-open-caucus (2016-02-13)
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