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  • Canadian Human Rights Commission Quarterly Financial Report - 3rd Quarter - 2014 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    Since the new section 29 1 2 a of the Financial Administration Act received Royal Assent on June 26 2011 Internal Support Services agreements are recorded as a revenue When compared to the third quarter of the previous year the revenues netted against the expenditures have decreased by 64 000 because one of the Commission s clients is winding down and therefore has reduced need for services 2 2 Statement of Department Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object Total year to date gross budgetary expenditures April to December have decreased by 425 225 compared to the expenditures of the previous year as per the attached Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object and represent 69 6 percent of the total authorities The majority of the expenditures are for personnel expenditures which represent 83 9 percent of the total gross amount spent as of December 31 2014 For your attention this statement includes an increase of 618 000 for Other Payments that is mainly due to a one time transition payment of 600 855 for implementing salary payment in arrears by the Government of Canada When not taking into account this one time transition payment the year to date expenditures have actually decreased by 1 026 000 This is mainly attributable to salary reduction from workforce adjustment that took place in the fall of 2013 3 Risks and Uncertainties Historically disadvantaged groups face several barriers to accessing human rights justice In 2013 14 the Commission held a series of roundtable meetings with Aboriginal women to hear about the challenges they face when speaking out against discrimination and when accessing our services One of the issues raised is that lack of awareness as well as very little support at the community level to help navigate legal and quasi judicial mechanisms constitute a barrier in accessing the Commission s complaint processes Without the proper resources there is a risk that the Commission s processes may not be accessible to historically disadvantaged groups in Canada especially Aboriginal women and girls To mitigate this risk the Commission will explore partnerships with organizations that can support and guide complainants through human rights processes It will continue to fast track cases that raise important human rights or access to justice issues There is also a growing demand for the Commission to provide information sessions to deliver training and to provide advice on human rights employment equity and dispute resolution In fact the demand for such services exceeded the Commission s ability to deliver within its limited resources during the last fiscal year Efforts to extend the Commission s reach using electronic technologies has had limited success for vulnerable populations with limited access to these tools and the Internet At the same time the Commission must remain nimble and adaptable to handle changes created by immigration trends a burgeoning Aboriginal population and four generations in the active workforce Within our existing resources there is a risk that the Commission may not have the sufficient capacity to undertake activities that raise awareness

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/canadian-human-rights-commission-quarterly-financial-report-3rd-quarter-2014 (2016-02-13)
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  • Canadian Human Rights Commission Quarterly Financial Report - 2nd Quarter - 2013 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    warrant is deemed to be an appropriation for the fiscal year in which it is issued The Commission uses the full accrual method of accounting to prepare and present its annual Financial Statements that are published in the Departmental Performance Report However the spending authorities voted by Parliament remain on an expenditure basis 2 Highlights of Fiscal Quarter and Fiscal Year to Date YTD Results 2 1 Statement of Authorities As reflected in the attached Statement of Authorities the Commission s total authorities available for use have decreased by approximately 1 7 million or 6 9 percent when compared to the second quarter of the previous year This decrease is attributable to the sunsetting of funds in 2013 14 related to the implementation of the repeal of Section 67 of the CHRA and to the fact that the Treasury Board allotment transfer for operating budget carry forward of 1 million has not been granted as of September 30 2013 and it was in 2012 13 The Commission provides Internal Support Services to certain other small government departments related to the provision of Finance Human Resources Compensation Procurement Administration and Information Technology services Since the new section 29 1 2 a of the Financial Administration Act received Royal Assent on June 26 2011 Internal Support Services agreements are recorded as a revenue The increase is mainly attributable to the fact that the revenues netted against the expenditures have increased by 0 5 million because the Commission started offering services to a new client 2 2 Statement of Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object Expenditures by Standard Object Total year to date budgetary expenditures April to September are comparable to the expenditures of the previous year as per the attached Budgetary expenditures by Standard Object and represents 48 4 percent of the total authorities The majority of the expenditures are for personnel expenditures which represent 87 4 percent of the total gross amount spent as of September 30 2013 Year to date revenues for internal support services provided by the Commission to certain small agencies have increased by 0 1 million due to additional internal support services provided to a new client 3 Risks and uncertainties Funding to address issues stemming from the repeal of section 67 comes to an end during fiscal 2013 14 However the expansion of the Commission s mandate will continue to drive demand for services Many of the post repeal complaints are complex and will require interpretation by tribunals and courts Furthermore much work is still needed to effectively prepare First Nations communities to prevent manage and resolve human rights disputes and to develop internal community based dispute resolution mechanisms Without sufficient resources there is a risk that the Commission will not be able to support tangible and sustainable progress toward improved accountability on human rights issues for First Nations governments and full human rights protection for Aboriginal people as intended by the legislation To mitigate this risk the Commission is helping First Nation communities employers and service

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/canadian-human-rights-commission-quarterly-financial-report-2nd-quarter-2013 (2016-02-13)
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  • Canadian Human Rights Commission Quarterly Financial Report - 3rd Quarter - 2013 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    CHRA The funding will sunset at the end of March 2014 The Commission provides internal support services to certain other small government departments related to the provision of finance human resources compensation procurement administration and information technology services Since the new section 29 1 2 a of the Financial Administration Act received Royal Assent on June 26 2011 Internal Support Services agreements are recorded as a revenue When compared to the third quarter of the previous year the revenues netted against the expenditures have increased by 0 1 million because the Commission started offering internal support services to a new client 2 2 Statement of Department Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object Total year to date budgetary expenditures April to December are comparable to the expenditures of the previous year as per the attached Budgetary Expenditures by Standard Object and represent 69 1 percent of the total authorities The majority of the expenditures are for personnel expenditures which represent 87 6 percent of the total gross amount spent as of December 31 2013 Year to date revenues for internal support services provided by the Commission to certain small agencies have increased by 0 5 million due to services provided to a new client and revenues not recorded in the third quarter of 2012 13 because of timing in invoicing In addition the Commission anticipates an operating budget carry forward of 950 000 dollars this year This is approximately the same as the previous fiscal year and is mainly due to delays in staffing and acquiring professional and special services 3 Risks and uncertainties The risk identified during the first quarter still applies Funding to address issues stemming from the repeal of section 67 comes to an end during fiscal 2013 14 However the expansion of the Commission s mandate will continue to drive demand for services Many of the post repeal complaints are complex and will require interpretation by tribunals and courts Furthermore much work is still needed to effectively prepare First Nations communities to prevent manage and resolve human rights disputes and to develop internal community based dispute resolution mechanisms Without sufficient resources there is a risk that the Commission will not be able to support tangible and sustainable progress toward improved accountability on human rights issues for First Nations governments and full human rights protection for Aboriginal people as intended by the legislation To mitigate this risk the Commission is helping First Nation communities employers and service providers develop skills and internal practices to resolve human rights issues within their communities and workplaces 4 Significant Changes in Relation to Operations Personnel and Programs Over the past year and half the Commission has redefined its vision so as to better serve Parliament and the people of Canada This resulted in a restructuring of the Commission s work into two basic streams Promotion and Protection When Parliament repealed section 67 of the CHRA to give residents of First Nations communities the same protections as other people in Canada the Commission received

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/canadian-human-rights-commission-quarterly-financial-report-3rd-quarter-2013 (2016-02-13)
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  • Now a Matter of Rights - Part 2 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    Nations capacity to address human rights issues The Handbook discusses human rights law how to prevent discrimination the Commission s dispute resolution process how to respond to a discrimination complaint and how to develop community based dispute resolution processes Making the Commission s Dispute Resolution Process More Accessible Clear language is important So too is a clear and understandable process for filing and resolving discrimination complaints Over the years the Commission has worked to make its dispute resolution process easier to understand and more accessible This does not diminish the fact that a process that requires a person to file a complaint against their government employer or fellow employee can be intimidating This can be further complicated by factors such as the small size of many First Nations communities and the strong family employment and friendship ties that exist within these communities The Commission has reviewed all of its procedures to ensure they are able to address the specific needs and circumstances of Aboriginal people Human Rights Training The Commission has already been involved in some human rights training with First Nations governments and other Aboriginal organizations Through dialogue presentations and publications such as the clear language guides the Commission has been working with First Nations governments to familiarize them with the requirements of the Canadian Human Rights Act and how it will apply It is also important to have formalized training for those who will be directly involved in a First Nations community based dispute resolution process Initiatives such as human rights training for trainers and investigation training for First Nations administrators would be beneficial However many First Nations governments have told the Commission that funding constraints limit their ability to get the training they need Freedom from Discrimination Discrimination Complaints A major challenge for both the Commission and First Nations communities is identifying how many discrimination complaints will come forward after June 2011 As mentioned earlier despite the fact that only discrimination complaints stemming from the Indian Act were barred by section 67 many First Nations people believed that they were excluded from the Canadian Human Rights Act entirely As a result it is possible that the Commission will also see a rise in complaints against First Nations governments related to issues that were not part of the repeal The Commission has some experience dealing with First Nations related complaints For example discrimination in employment matters has always been open to redress through the Canadian Human Rights Act Over the last five years the Commission accepted an average of 29 complaints each year involving First Nations governments Many of these about 35 were settled at an early stage while 28 were dismissed and 17 were referred to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal for further inquiry The breakdown of complaints is as follows Number of complaints involving First Nations 2006 39 2007 22 2008 26 2009 20 2010 37 Total 144 The volume of inquires received by the Commission may provide some indication of the number of future complaints The Commission receives many thousands of inquires each year Phone calls asking about issues that could not be dealt with are treated as inquiries by Commission staff In many cases Commission officers are able to help callers resolve the issue without filing a discrimination complaint or by referring them to other agencies that can help A relatively small proportion of inquires result in formal discrimination complaints to the Commission The following table shows the number of inquiries that the Commission handled in 2009 and 2010 that dealt specifically with Aboriginal issues followed by the number of those inquiries that the Commission accepted as complaints Number of inquiries involving Aboriginal issues 2008 2009 2010 Total inquiries 54 100 95 Accepted as complaints 20 13 40 From June 18 2008 The above numbers include inquiries and complaints against the Government of Canada which were previously barred because of section 67 The Commission has also continued to deal with complaints involving First Nations governments that were not shielded by section 67 Our preliminary analysis indicates that after June 2011 the Commission s caseload may rise by between 150 and 170 complaints per year The actual number of complaints that the Commission receives will depend on a number of factors including the extent to which people are aware of their rights under the Canadian Human Rights Act early efforts taken by First Nations governments to prevent discrimination and integrate respect for human rights principles into every day practice and the number of First Nations governments that already have suitable processes for resolving human rights disputes within their communities Systemic Discrimination The volume of discrimination complaints does not tell the whole story Not all complaints are the same Through the use of community based dispute resolution processes and the Commission s dispute resolution processes it is likely that many complaints will be resolved quickly Some complaints will be more complex and difficult to resolve This is particularly true with regard to systemic discrimination complaints Systemic discrimination occurs when policies or practices that are part of the structure of an organization create or perpetuate disadvantage for individuals or groups based on one of the 11 prohibited grounds of discrimination 17 Systemic discrimination complaints can establish important precedents for the future as they deal with systemic problems rather than individual issues These complaints often take time to resolve and sometimes require determination by the courts For example a decision ruling that a particular government policy or program is discriminatory would likely lead to a remedial order that ensures the discrimination does not re occur The following cases were recently considered by the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal and are illustrative Louie and Beattie v Indian and Northern Affairs Canada The first decision of the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal following the repeal of section 67 was the case of Louie and Beattie v Indian and Northern Affairs Canada 18 In their complaint against Indian and Northern Affairs Canada the complainants James Louie and Joyce Beattie alleged that the department

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/now-matter-rights-part-2 (2016-02-13)
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  • Annual Report 2011 - Page 2 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    a milestone in a three year Commission wide process that took a critical look at who we are and what we do Throughout this process we challenged ourselves to find ways to better meet the needs of Canadians We re evaluated underlying assumptions so as to find ways to improve productivity effectiveness and efficiency in all aspects of our operations Through it all we strove to maximize the impact of our work for the net benefit of Canadian society We made investments in the development of more effective online tools We streamlined our service delivery model this resulted in the closure of some regional offices We developed a simplified and more collaborative approach to employment equity audits and in the course of that improved the reach of those audits within the federal sphere We clarified our international role to ensure that it reflects Canadian priorities And we created a separate communications branch with a mandate to ensure that public discussion of human rights issues affecting Canadians is informed by insight and understanding The full repeal of section 67 of the Canadian Human Rights Act which previously excluded all matters under the Indian Act brought us a new set of issues Wrestling with them has required a lot of relationship building as well as a lot of listening and learning about traditional Aboriginal laws and customs At the same time we have continued to build on our understanding of other federally regulated organizations in order to gain a better sense of how we can be helpful Our dealings with the public sector are noteworthy in this regard Because of our efforts over the past three years the Canadian Human Rights Commission is better prepared to anticipate change to respond to emerging issues and to assist the public sector in facing new

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/annual-report-2011-page-2 (2016-02-13)
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  • Annual Report 2011 - Page 3 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    Statements Glossary Multimedia Resources Main Page Breadcrumb trail Home Resources Annual Report 2011 Page 3 Resources Frequently Asked Questions Helpful Links Publications News Room Glossary Multimedia Quick Links I want to complain My employer obligations About us News Resources Annual Report 2011 Page 3 THE COMMISSION Mandate The Commission promotes the core principle of equal opportunity and works to prevent discrimination in Canada by promoting the development of human rights cultures understanding human rights through research and policy development protecting human rights through effective case and complaint management and representing the public interest to advance human rights for all Canadians Commission members A full time Chief Commissioner acts as the Chief Executive Officer and leads the Commission A full time Deputy Chief Commissioner and three part time Commissioners support the Chief Commissioner Commission operations The Secretary General guides the daily operations of employees The Commission s operating budget is 23 million 2011 2012 fiscal year Resolving Disputes By law the Commission must look at every discrimination complaint that it receives When possible the Commission encourages people to try to solve their disputes informally and at the earliest opportunity In the event no agreement is reached the Commission may conduct an investigation If it believes the complaint has merit the Commission can refer it to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal for further examination Otherwise the Commission will dismiss the complaint In 2011 the Commission received 1 914 potential complaints accepted 910 complaints referred 167 complaints to alternate redress approved 209 settlements dismissed 174 complaints and referred 129 complaints to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal for further examination For more information or to view other statistics and trends visit the Commission s website at publications ar 2011 ra dr stats rd eng aspx Distinguishing between the Commission and the Tribunal The Canadian

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/annual-report-2011-page-3 (2016-02-13)
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  • Annual Report 2011 - Page 4 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    if the Attorney General s interpretation of the Canadian Human Rights Act prevails it could nullify the intent of Parliament when it voted to give people living under the Indian Act the right to live free from discrimination People governed by the Indian Act would have no recourse in many instances of discriminatory treatment affecting their daily lives The origins of an injustice When the Canadian Human Rights Act was drafted in 1977 the federal government was in discussions with First Nations on reforming the Indian Act During these discussions the government promised to make no changes to the Indian Act before full consultations were completed The government believed that the proposed human rights legislation had the potential to strike down provisions of the Indian Act thereby changing it In order to uphold their commitment to First Nations legislators included a section in the Canadian Human Rights Act that explicitly prevented people from filing complaints that had to do with the Indian Act It was meant to be a temporary measure Although there were a number of attempts to remove the exemption from the legislation the section was not fully repealed until 2011 Changes in the law should help aboriginal youth by David Langtry Acting Chief Commissioner Canadian Human Rights Commission As published in the Globe and Mail on June 24 2011 In convocation ceremonies this month beaming young faces reflect Canada s rich demographic fabric With one exception aboriginal youth Aboriginal kids on reserves are six times less likely to graduate from high school than the rest of our population There s a better chance of ending up in jail I believe the Canadian Human Rights Act can and should be pivotal in changing this The Act was created to end racial and other discrimination once commonplace in our society Excluding people living under the Indian Act from this law since 1977 was an injustice That s now changed As of this month people governed by the Indian Act are entitled to the same human rights protections as everyone else Chronic disparities in funding for health education and social services for more than 700 000 First Nations people are the product of entrenched discriminatory policies But the discriminatory thrust of such policies can be challenged now under the Canadian Human Rights Act Disparities in essential services to First Nations people are well documented In her final report as Auditor General Sheila Fraser again noted her profound disappointment that despite federal action in response to our recommendations over the years a disproportionate number of first nations people still lack the most basic services that other Canadians take for granted In a country as rich as Canada this disparity is unacceptable The Canada First Nations Joint Action Plan recently announced by the federal government and native leaders promises new thinking Since human rights law is something new in the equation it could help break with the past Now we will see whether our human rights law has the same power to bring positive change to natives as it has to the rest of society As of June 18 people can file complaints against First Nations governments as well as the federal government if they believe they have been discriminated against in relation to services that affect their daily lives This should translate into an onus on First Nations governments to ensure better accommodation of people with disabilities for example or to provide recourse for those denied the right to vote in band council elections on the basis of race gender sexual orientation or family status Similarly it puts an onus on the federal government to ensure that funding for essential services such as health education and child welfare is equal to the levels of funding available off reserve On this issue hinges the question of whether the Canadian Human Rights Act can be a catalyst for real change It s all coming to a head in a case before the courts The First Nations Child and Family Caring Society of Canada and the Assembly of First Nations maintain that disparities in funding for child welfare services which the federal government is required to provide on reserves constitute discriminatory treatment Simply put the federal government puts up less money than the provinces and territories on reserves this translates into higher rates of foster care and poorer prospects of surviving a troubled childhood Ottawa disagrees The Attorney General of Canada says the Canadian Human Rights Act does not apply to federal government funding for services The Canadian Human Rights Commission opposes such a limitation on our jurisdiction and we are saying so in court If the Attorney General succeeds the federal government would get sweeping immunity from human rights law Complaints about access to clean water health and education would be turned away before they are even heard This is critical for aboriginal youth close to half a million strong the fastest growing segment of Canada s population Even when a young aboriginal person can get into university there s often no money for it Not only is this unfair and discriminatory it s a collective failure that may ultimately hurt Canada s competitive advantage in tomorrow s global economy No one will forgive our failure The Canadian Human Rights Act can make a difference for aboriginal youth if we don t stand in the way Human Rights Accountability in National Security Practices The human rights implications of national security measures have been the focus of research and investigative work by the Commission over the past decade In November 2011 the Commission tabled a Special Report to Parliament Human Rights Accountability in National Security Practices Ten years after the 9 11 attacks national security and human rights continue to be a matter of public debate The media regularly tell stories of air travellers who have experienced discrimination during security screening because of their race religion or disability At the heart of the debate is the question of how to ensure our collective safety

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/annual-report-2011-page-4 (2016-02-13)
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  • Annual Report 2011 - Page 5 | Canadian Human Rights Commission
    Specialist Employment Equity and Diversity Farm Credit Canada Toronto December 7 2011 The materials are excellent This collaborative process is a breath of fresh air Misty Giroux Manager Legislated Programs and Privacy Coordinator Nav Canada Toronto December 7 2011 Fitness to work The Commission receives more complaints related to disability than any other ground in the Canadian Human Rights Act Many of these complaints are filed by people who feel that they have not been properly accommodated by their employer following an illness or injury When someone returns to work following an illness or injury it is common for them to receive a fitness to work assessment performed by a medical professional This assessment of the physical and mental health of an employee determines whether changes to their duties or their work environment are required The Commission has found that many of the disability complaints that it receives are the result of inconsistent fitness to work processes Misunderstandings between the parties involved missteps due to confidentiality and privacy concerns or perceived limits to what can be done because of existing policies or collective agreements are often cited as reasons for why an employee was not properly accommodated To address this issue the Commission is working with government departments private sector companies and healthcare providers to develop a standardized fitness to work process This process will establish common terminology and establish clear guidelines for accommodation as well as clarify the roles and responsibilities of employers employees unions health care providers and insurance boards Accommodating employees with a disability is a challenge facing many employers today This standardized approach to workplace accommodation will contribute to a more inclusive workplace that ultimately benefits employers and employees alike Mental Health in the Workplace In 2011 42 5 of disability complaints were related to mental health The stigma around mental health can be a significant barrier A supportive and accommodating workplace helps people with mental health problems reach their professional goals The Commission is working with partners such as the Mental Health Commission of Canada to counter stigma and discrimination against people with mental illness Targeting Employment Equity The Employment Equity Act applies to both the federal public sector and the federally regulated private sector It protects approximately 13 of Canada s workforce The Canadian Human Rights Commission works with over 600 federally regulated employers to ensure compliance with the Employment Equity Act The Act helps ensure that among federally regulated employees equal employment opportunity is afforded to four designated groups of people women Aboriginal people persons with disabilities and members of visible minorities 2011 was the first full year that the Commission applied its improved employment equity audit process Under the new approach employers with difficulty in maintaining equity for members of the four designated groups are prioritized for audits Employers who demonstrate they have achieved higher representation are acknowledged as top performers in employment equity Through this new approach the Commission broadened its reach and had a greater impact on employment equity The

    Original URL path: http://www.ccdp-chrc.ca/eng/content/annual-report-2011-page-5 (2016-02-13)
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