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  • - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
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    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/bank/files/2013_ChangingFace_ExpandedChart.pdf (2016-04-27)
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  • News - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    for each patient enrolled I now know the name of my pharmacist and I learned he has an amazing team of pharmacists I ve elevated his status to be part of my circle of care said Davison She suggested that all pharmacists take the following steps to build relationships with patients taking medications for mental illness Gauge body language and emotional state especially for initial fills The person often feels terrified of their diagnosis and people judging them says Davison Pharmacists can establish rapport with a few simple words such as Today might not be a good day for you but I want you know that we re here to help Never say the name of the drug where others may overhear use a private counselling room Help patients formulate questions to ask at their next doctor s appointment Offer to be part of the patient s wellness recovery action plan which lists healthcare professionals who can be contacted during times of need The pharmacist will know what we can safely do with medications and he ll contact the doctor This is how you can save someone from six months of recovery This is how you can save a life said Davison Dawn Richards Vice President Canadian Arthritis Patients Alliance Almost all surveyed members of the Alliance 96 reported going to the same pharmacy and 87 agreed that pharmacists are important members of their healthcare team Three out of four 78 said their interaction goes beyond a simple retail transaction though just 38 said they always see the same pharmacist Patients also value help with insurance coverage and cite medication reviews as a worthwhile service from pharmacists Fifty six percent felt pharmacists are knowledgable about arthritis and 40 reported that pharmacists are making recommendations to them or docs about medications Almost a third 29 agreed that pharmacists could do more Their suggestions include More information and support regarding drug shortages biologics and subsequent entry biologics SEBs We re finding out that pharmacists haven t heard of SEBs and don t know they re coming said Richards Better services for renewals including online renewals More advice on arthritis the side effects of medication and the roles of diet and vitamins Use of a counselling room a tiny half wall at the counter is not enough to ensure privacy Joanne Lewis Manager of Diabetes Education and Certified Diabetes Educator Canadian Diabetes Association What is one of the greatest opportunities for pharmacists in the area of diabetes care One on one screenings using a medical device or the CANRisk questionnaire online or in print to identify those who are at risk or have undiagnosed diabetes Then give follow up care in the form of a plan of action Don t just say they re at high risk said Lewis What is one of pharmacists greatest challenges They struggle with counselling for behaviour change noted Lewis who has trained more than 1 000 pharmacists This is also the area where patients need the most

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/en/news/details/id/182 (2016-04-27)
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  • News - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    to partner with other organizations and we have to have those conversations to determine what is the need and how do we tackle it together New services Leung pointed to a Shopper s pilot program for shingles vaccination that is taking immunizations to the next level We saw tremendous growth of immunizations in provinces where we did this she said If we look to our boomer population they are looking to prevent disease it s really about answering that patient need Ned Pojskic Pharmacy Strategy Leader at Green Shield Canada talked about his company s partnership with pharmacy to do just that The Pharmacist Health Coaching for Cardiovascular Care program is the first time a private payer is investing in pharmacy services across plans to meet an unmet patient need in cardiovascular health We are very proud of pharmacist health coaching as it redefines the relationship between pharmacy and private payers He pointed to key components of the program that have contributed to its success mandatory certification and training for pharmacists standardized documentation forms to act as guides and software to help with deployment as well as clear reporting and outcome measures We recognize that our role goes beyond paying claims and we re trying to play a much bigger part Pharmacy services are an important component of that strategy said Pojskic Neil Donald Director Private Payers for McKesson Canada which owns the largest pharmacy banner group in Canada said pharmacists become their own champions when they have a real interest in something A lot of them are in this for the betterment of patient care and we want to support that entrepreneurial spirit he said outlining innovative and successful programs centred around pharmacy in McKesson s own banner group One example is a Medicine Shoppe owner in B C

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/en/news/details/id/181 (2016-04-27)
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  • Table of Contents - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    Ethics Rene Breault Jill Hall 13 Personal Finance Mike Sullivan IV Financial Management for Your Practice Section Editor Michael S Jaczko Sample financial statements 14 Financial Statements and Forms of Business Ownership Rubin Cohen 15 Statements Included Within Financial Statements Michael S Jaczko 16 Financial Ratios Putting the Numbers to Work David Cunningham 17 The Canadian Third Party Payer Market Mike Sullivan 18 Hospital Financial Administration Bill Wilson V Risk Management Section Editor Michael S Jaczko 19 Managing Risk in a Pharmacy Setting Michael S Jaczko 20 Insurance Basics Michael S Jaczko Ron Poole John T Hunt VI Operations Section Editor Rita E Winn 21 Pharmacy Operations Jody Shkrobot 22 Inventory Management Rick Brown 23 Loss Prevention in Pharmacy Leigh Jones 24 Safety and Security in Pharmacy David Toner 25 Pharmacy Services Stacy Johnson 26 Contingency Planning J Reddy Bade Anita Brown Bob Brown Aleksandra Trkulja 27 Legal Considerations for Pharmacy Operations Della R Croteau Mark N Wiseman VII Quality Control Quality Assurance and Continuous Quality Improvement Section Editor Kevin W Hall 28 Medication Incidents and Quality Improvement Todd A Boyle Certina Ho VIII Human Resources Management Section Editor Rita E Winn 29 Introduction to Human Resources Management David Town 30 Creating a Desirable Workplace The Eternal Circle Susan E Beresford 31 Effective Management Styles Billy B Cheung 32 Effective Management of Human Resources R Mark Dickson 33 S H O T Screening Hiring Orientation and Training Rita E Winn 34 Performance Management Rita E Winn 35 Conflict Management and Progressive Discipline R Mark Dickson 36 Managing in a Unionized Environment Tracey Phillips Mark Coulter 37 Legal Considerations in Employment and Labour Law P A Neena Gupta Roger Tam IX Developing Implementing and Managing Clinical Pharmacy Services Section Editor Alan Low 38 Developing Patient Care Services Alan Low 39 Planning

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/table-of-contents (2016-04-27)
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  • Acknowledgements - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    number of research projects that are focussed on demonstrating the value that pharmacists can contribute to the Canadian healthcare system We hope that this textbook will also contribute to the advancement of the profession by helping to develop the next generation of pharmacists We would also like to extend our gratitude to Christine LeBlanc managing editor for keeping this project moving and grounded in sound editorial context And we thank Brush Education which provided the steady guidance of a publishing house to see this project to completion Supporting the Foundation were a number of companies and individuals who very generously provided unrestricted educational grants as detailed below Principal Benefactors Green Shield Canada 25 000 McKesson Canada 25 000 Pharmascience 20 000 Desante Canada 15 000 Ontario Pharmacists Association 10 000 Patrons 5 000 Alberta Pharmacists Association RxA Allied Pharmacists Inc AstraZeneca Canada BC Chain Drug Stores Pharmasave Drugs National Ltd Safeway Pharmacy Shoppers Drug Mart TEVA Canada Turner Drug Store Ltd London ON in memory of Glen Robb Friends of the Foundation 1 000 AdhereRx in Toronto ON and Sunshine Coast BC Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists Ottawa ON Jones Healthcare London ON LEO Pharma Toronto ON Lovell Drugs Oshawa ON Manitoba Society of Pharmacists Winnipeg MB Shoppers Drug Mart National Associates Alumni Remedy sRx Markham ON In addition to the corporations above that generously supported this initiative a number of individual pharmacists answered the personal call to leave a legacy Their generous support is greatly appreciated Elaine Akers Peterborough ON Carolyn Neil Bornstein Newmarket ON Rick Sandy Brown Aurora ON Aubrey Browne Dalia Salib Toronto ON William Barbara Coon Muskoka Medical Centre Pharmacy Muskoka ON Roger Daher Lefko Pharmasave 794 Toronto ON Ryan Fullerton Brown s Guardian Pharmacy Walkerton ON Ivan Ho Kennebacasis Drugs Rothesay NB Sheila Kemp Aikenheads

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/acknowledgements (2016-04-27)
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  • Publications - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    Pharmacy Perceptions of Pharmacy Grants Awards Innovation Fund Grant Pillar of Pharmacy Award Wellspring Leadership Awards CFP AFPC Graduate Student Award Past President Award Rx D Industrial Student Award Corporate Recognition Award Events Pillar of Pharmacy Dinner Innovation Gala Wellspring Leadership Awards Reception Charity Golf Classic Pharmacy Forum Supporting Innovation in Pharmacy for a Healthier Canada You have an error in your SQL syntax check the manual that corresponds to

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/publications/details/id/contact-us (2016-04-27)
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  • News - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    the government funded minor ailments program in Saskatchewan 1 The study surveyed 125 customers who had received an assessment and prescription for a minor ailment at 90 participating pharmacies Virtually all of the participants agreed they would return to the same pharmacist for advice on another ailment with an agreement level of 3 8 out of a possible 4 0 for strongly agree Agreement was also strong 3 4 when asked if they would seek advice from any pharmacist for another minor condition Participants were most likely to present with cold sores 34 insect bites 20 and seasonal allergies 18 The majority were women 66 and they were most likely between the ages of 30 and 39 years 22 or 50 and 59 years 21 Just over half 55 indicated they had seen another healthcare professional for the condition at some point and at the time of interaction with the pharmacist their symptoms most likely had been present for just one day 30 Seven times out of 10 72 the customer approached the pharmacist for help When these respondents were asked why they approached a pharmacist rather than a physician their top reasons were trust in the pharmacist for minor ailments 26 the feeling that the condition was not serious enough for a doctor 20 and an unwillingness to wait at a medical clinic 15 After the assessment participants strongly agreed that the pharmacist explained how to use the medicine 3 8 asked appropriate questions 3 8 and spent enough time to determine the best treatment 3 7 Four out of five said their condition had completely resolved or significantly improved and only 3 reported they later saw a physician as well The study comprised phase one of an extensive research initiative by researchers at the University of Saskatchewan scheduled

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/en/news/details/id/142 (2016-04-27)
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  • News - Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy
    Pharmacy Neighbourhood Pharmacy Association of Canada and Pfizer Canada Led by Pharmacists Manitoba in partnership with Manitoba Health Healthy Living and Seniors College of Pharmacists of Manitoba and College of Pharmacy University of Manitoba the pilot was conducted over almost a year involving 12 pharmacies and 119 patients over the age of 18 who were on unemployment and income assistance The aim was to demonstrate the value of pharmacists in the delivery of preventative healthcare Pharmacists proved that they are a key access point to a majority of the population much more so than other healthcare providers says Dr Brenna Shearer Chief Executive Officer Pharmacists Manitoba Those who participated really appreciated the opportunity to enhance their smoking cessation services and would have liked to offer the program to a wider range of people Patients were asked to complete smoking cessation forms and log every cigarette consumed within a 24 hour period Their responses were assessed by the pharmacist who then initiated a quit date and determined the best use of smoking cessation aides Follow up visits with the pharmacist were scheduled on the quit date one week later and then one tree and six months following that The results showed that 41 of patients reduced their number of cigarettes a day and 63 of them experienced a reduction in coughing as a result While only 2 quit smoking entirely 19 quit for three months and 30 quit for one month Given that this was a low income patient group Brenna says the reduction in cigarettes used per day could result in significant monthly savings up to 266 per month per person That s a sizable portion of their available monthly income she says Even the cost of running the program 470 per patient is significantly less than the potential health

    Original URL path: http://cfpnet.ca/en/news/details/id/172 (2016-04-27)
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