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  • Importing regulations - Canada Business Network
    topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Regulations Regulated business activities Importing regulations Importing regulations Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Importing is a regulated process If you wish to buy products from other countries you will need to comply with a variety of regulations The importing process can often seem overwhelming due to the amount of paperwork and the number of different rules and regulations that you need to consider This document provides you with the guidance you need to navigate this process when buying goods from other countries Registering for an import export account Before you start importing you must register your business for an import export account Business Number BN Your Business Number is your single account number for dealing with the government regarding GST HST payroll import export and other activities Navigating the border There is nothing worse than having your goods turned away at the border or being held up at customs because you didn t complete the proper paperwork Before you place your import order be sure that you understand the rules and regulations involved in clearing your goods through customs You must Determine if the goods you want to import are prohibited from entering Canada Determine if the goods are subject to any restrictions that would require you to obtain approvals or permits before importing them Know how to classify the goods tariff classification and how any tariffs duties or taxes are calculated Ensure that your supplier meets all Canadian labelling and marking requirements Ensure that you use a shipping company that understands and complies with customs formalities Make sure that all required paperwork is ready to be examined along with your shipment Be prepared to pay the duties and taxes owing All of this information and more can be found in the Step by Step guide to Importing Commercial Goods into Canada Step by Step Guide to Importing Commercial Goods into Canada Learn the basics of the commercial importing process Reporting your shipment Find out how to report goods that are imported into Canada Customs Tariff Use the Customs Tariff to determine the classification of your imported and exported goods and the rate of duty you may need to pay on your imports Export and import controls Get permission to export or import products related to agriculture firearms logs softwood lumber steel textiles clothing the military and more Permits and licences Find the federal provincial territorial and municipal permits and licences that you may need to start or manage your business Centre of

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2727/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Building codes, regulations and related standards - Canada Business Network
    daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Regulations Regulated business activities Building codes regulations and related standards Building codes regulations and related standards Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type If you are in the construction or contracting business or if you are fixing buildings that you own you need to understand the building codes and standards in your province or territory National Building Code of Canada Find out about the national building code on which provincial and territorial building codes are based Alberta Building Code Applies only to Alberta Are you in the construction or contracting business or will you be altering buildings you own Find out about Alberta s building codes and standards BC Building Code BC Plumbing Code and BC Fire Code Applies only to British Columbia Learn about the regulations for home and building construction in British Columbia Manitoba s Building Code and related regulations Applies only to Manitoba Learn about the law and regulations related to the construction and renovation of houses and buildings in Manitoba Building and Plumbing Code Nova Scotia Applies only to Nova Scotia Find out about the regulations for building homes and buildings in Nova Scotia Ontario Building Code Applies only to Ontario Find online publications about the regulations for building homes and buildings in Ontario Smoke Free Ontario Applies only to Ontario Learn about your legal responsibilities as a business owner and employer Building safety Applies only to Yukon Learn about the standards regulations inspections and permits for building homes and buildings in the Yukon Building Code Prince Edward Island Applies only to Prince Edward Island Learn about the regulations for building homes and buildings in Prince Edward Island as well as its Barrier Free Design regulations

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/3941/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Accessibility - Canada Business Network
    achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Regulations Regulated business activities Accessibility Accessibility Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Are you looking for talented employees Do you want to attract more customers Making your business accessible to persons with disabilities may help Your business may gain a reputation for being open to all Start implementing changes now as an investment in your future make the necessary renovations to your building train your employees and update your website so that it s easy for all visitors to find what they want Be prepared to provide your customers with the highest level of service and to provide your employees with the best work environment possible Making it easier for Canadians with disabilities to do business with you makes good business sense AccessON Applies only to Ontario Find out what you need to do under Ontario accessibility laws to make your business or workplace accessible for people with disabilities Accessibility standards Applies only to Manitoba As a business owner you need to be aware of The Accessibility for Manitobans Act and how it may affect your workplace How to make workplaces accessible Applies only to Ontario Ensure that your employee attraction hiring and human resources practices meet Ontario accessible requirements Access to buildings by persons with disabilities Applies only to Québec Learn more about the barrier free design standards to which you must comply to ensure buildings are accessible to persons with disabilities Accessible workplace If you want to attract the right employees to your business and ensure that they are productive make them feel comfortable and welcome Making your workplace accessible Use this checklist to learn how to make your workplace accessible and how to attract and hire talented employees with disabilities Building codes regulations and related standards Find out about the building codes and standards in your province or territory I want to know my obligations If you are an organization or business

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2649/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Choosing an Internet service provider - Canada Business Network
    Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Developing your website Choosing an Internet service provider Choosing an Internet service provider Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type An Internet service provider or ISP is an organization that provides access to the Internet It may also offer other services such as Web hosting Web development and email Connection Before choosing a service provider determine your business needs What will you do on the Internet and how much time will you spend connected Once you have a clear idea of these requirements you can research providers that serve your area Your needs will determine what type of connection and speed you need Let your potential ISP know if your business plan includes Having a website Performing online transactions selling online Using social media Sending large files like videos or images Hosting interactive tools Supporting high traffic during peak times Speed Your connection speed is determined by bandwidth which represents the amount of data that you can transmit in a fixed period of time This is usually measured in bits per second bps and expressed in units of thousands K or millions M How you transfer data will determine the type of speed you need Upstream speed refers to how fast you can send data upload while downstream refers to the speed at which you can receive data download Although high downstream speed is usually most important you would need fast upstream capability if you want to transmit large documents or host a website Your connection speed may also be affected by your computer s capacity and whether it has been infected with malware Wireless If you use hardware such as laptops handheld devices or smartphones in your business you may require wireless Wi Fi services If these services are available in your area make sure that connecting to a wireless network does not interfere with the security of your business Your wireless requirements depend on the types and frequencies of the transmissions you make If you want to connect several computers to the Internet or have access from anywhere at any time your requirements will be greater than if you are only online a few hours per week You may find you do not need wireless at all if your Internet use is low Software for value added services Many Internet service providers offer their own software or value added services to allow you to Read email offline Store emails and other files online Use multiple email addresses Chat online Have a hosted website These services may also include security software to filter spam protect against malware viruses worms and Trojans and filter or block out certain content Technical support If you have questions about email the Internet or your website you may need technical support from time to

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2635/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Website visibility: Choosing the right meta tags - Canada Business Network
    Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Developing your website Website visibility Website visibility Choosing the right meta tags Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Having a website is an important step towards gaining more exposure for your business Once it is up and running how will it reach your target audience Most people find websites with the help of a search engine or directory your website must be properly listed and accessible to users Registering it with the major search engines and directories takes time and effort but if the process is done properly your rankings will be higher resulting in potentially more traffic Searching When a user enters a query into a search engine the engine sifts through the pages recorded in its index to find the best match and then ranks the results in order of what it believes is most relevant Each search engine uses its own algorithm to determine relevancy and ranking How each search engine s algorithm works is a closely kept secret However the following is often considered The location of keywords on a Web page Title tags containing the search terms are often assumed to be more relevant than titles tags that do not Similarly pages that contain the search term near the top of the page are also considered to be of higher relevance than those that do not Keyword density in relation to the search term Search engine algorithms will analyze how often search keywords occur in relation to other words on a webpage The greater the keyword density the more relevancy the page will likely be given Link analysis By analyzing how pages link to each other a search engine can determine the subject of a webpage and its importance to the search Click through metrics A search engine will often analyze which search result links are being chosen by Internet users and attach greater relevancy to pages chosen more frequently Using the correct metadata such as proper titles descriptions and keywords can positively affects how search engines rank your website Title Recognized by every major search engine this is one of the most important meta tag A key factor in getting a high ranking the title ensures that the correct name of your website will appear above the summary in a search engine listing Including relevant keywords in the title can also help your website rank higher in search engine listings However do not write a full length explanation like that found in the description and do not simply insert a line of terms like those found in the keywords Description Summarize your page concisely for search engines by using the description meta tag This appears in the search engine as the summary under the title of your page

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2633/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Increasing website traffic - Canada Business Network
    maximize each traffic channel Direct visitors These are people who type in your domain name and go directly to your website Three key tactics are regularly used to increase direct visitor traffic Memorable domain names Choosing the right domain name to represent your business online can have a significant impact on visitor traffic An existing business should generally try to use an established name as its domain name For example Joe s Beach Pails should obtain a domain name such as joesbeachpails ca or joesbeachpails com By doing so Joe is taking advantage of the branding that his company has achieved People who are already familiar with the real world Joe s Beach Pails company will easily remember the domain name which will make locating the website more intuitive Offline advertising and promotion Business cards postcards traditional direct mail newspaper ads flyers giveaways and brochures that feature a domain name are all excellent ways to promote a website A good marketing campaign will use a combination of offline advertising techniques to direct a potential customer to your website where you can display more detailed sales information and encourage the visitor to make contact or to buy Viral marketing The premise of viral marketing is that there is nothing quite as valuable as a friend s referral On the Internet it is quick and easy to let someone know about a great website company or product Like a virus a good idea can be spread at an incredible rate passing from person to person and steadily increasing awareness of your website By turning your own customers into sales agents your business can implement viral marketing as an effective inexpensive promotional tool Visitors who find you through search engines Most people find websites through the help of a search engine or directory so it is important that your website be properly listed and accessible to users Search engine services Since listing a website is a complicated process you may find it easier to hire a business that specializes in search engine submission and website optimization When you do it is a good idea to check into the business deliverables follow up services customer service and track record Paid ads All major search engines and directories offer a range of advertising options to suit every budget and every type of marketing campaign Here s an overview of some of the options that are available Buying a higher ranking position Search engines will provide your business with a higher ranking position if you buy a search term For example the term fishing may be bought by B s Fishing Store When a visitor searches for the term fishing B s listing will appear at the top of the list but will be identified as a paid listing Pay per click ads Some search engines and websites offer an advertising option in which you are only charged for the actual number of clicks to your website For example when a visitor searches on the term

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2631/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Form partnerships or buy another business - Canada Business Network
    sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Growing Planning for business growth Ways to grow your business Form partnerships or buy another business Form partnerships or buy another business Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Have you considered joint venture opportunities that could grow your business Instead of doing it all yourself you could link up with another business or a partner who complements what you do to mutual advantage Partnerships or strategic alliances are a way to

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2674/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Increase sales - Canada Business Network
    designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Growing Planning for business growth Ways to grow your business Increase sales Increase sales Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Grow your business by finding ways to increase sales or by targeting new markets To increase sales you may have to introduce new business lines expand your market increase your marketing activities and improve customer service If you are in manufacturing this could mean increasing your productivity to meet demand Introduce new products or services Provide a broader range of products or services for your clients or introduce completely new lines You ll need to research your market to see if there is an appetite for your proposed offering Consider using some of your existing clients as a testing bed which can help you manage some of the risks and even help you learn how the product or service can be improved Pay special attention to marketing and promotion to get the word out on your new offerings Expand to new markets While targeting new markets can be costly it can increase your client base Market research will help you understand the potential new market and help you devise a strategy to tackle it You ll need to also consider marketing sales distribution and increasing your production to meet the new demand Enhance your sales channels Evaluate and optimize your sales channels This could help you reach more clients increase your market control and improve profitability For example you could Provide your sales staff with enhanced training Contract independent sales representatives or hire your own Add retail outlets Use resellers Implement an e business strategy Marketing activities Improve the efficiency of your marketing activities Track the outcome of your current marketing or advertising and be prepared to shift your strategy if you are not seeing your desired results Study your intended clients to know how best to reach them and plan your marketing strategy accordingly Change price terms or conditions of billing Changing your prices terms or conditions of billing could stimulate market demand for products or services Keep an eye on what your competitors are offering and your own profit margins to determine if you can reduce your cost Without touching your price sometimes sweetening the deal with favourable terms can sway the buyer your way Keep an eye on the competition Always be aware of what your competitors are doing This information helps you understand their behaviours capabilities and limitations Armed with this knowledge you will be better prepared to

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2676/ (2016-02-14)
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