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  • How to prepare a winning business loan request - Canada Business Network
    innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog How to prepare a winning business loan request Blog How to prepare a winning business loan request February 11 2016 Tags Planning Financing This guest blog post is provided by the Business Development Bank of Canada BDC which offers financing subordinate financing venture capital and consulting services to 30 000 small and medium sized Canadian businesses Bankers are just like other business people They re always on the lookout for new clients and can t remain in business if they don t sell their product For a bank that product is money However bankers also have valid concerns about to whom they loan money Extending a loan carries risk That s why bankers will carefully evaluate your ability to repay a loan As an entrepreneur you have to understand and respond to those concerns if you want to present a solid and persuasive business loan request What a banker looks for To boost your chances of obtaining a loan you have to understand how a banker will assess your request and what you can do to help them say yes even if you re a first time business borrower In its risk assessment a bank isn t looking only at your ability to execute a project and repay the loan Your banker will also consider the project itself and ask questions about your financial projections collateral business plan personal financial situation and due diligence on your proposed project To help boost your chances of obtaining a loan the Business Development Bank of Canada BDC recently published a free eBook called How to Get a Business Loan A Guide to Preparing a Winning Loan Request Step by step advice to get a business loan This guide gives you step by step advice on how to make it easy for a banker to lend you money and hopefully get the business loan you need to finance your company s profitable growth and success Find out 6 factors your banker will consider when assessing your request What issues you need to consider besides the interest rate 3 common mistakes entrepreneurs make when borrowing

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5354/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Canadian women-owned businesses can leverage trade missions to develop business abroad! - Canada Business Network
    technology partnerships integration in global value chain pipelines and funding through business to business meetings and networking events WBENC National Conference and Business Fair in Orlando Florida June 20 23 2016 Network with supplier diversity procurement specialists from leading corporations multinationals and government agencies as well as women business leaders Why trade missions Trade missions can be an effective way to investigate and take advantage of opportunities abroad As part of a delegation led by Government of Canada officials you can benefit from on the ground support and heightened credibility in the market Women focused trade missions offer exclusive access to top companies looking to source from women through high caliber networking opportunities potential business to business meetings and other valuable programming Getting the best value from trade missions Advance research and preparation can help you determine whether you are a good fit for the market and maximize your efficiency during the mission You should understand market demand potential customers and competition for your products or services Match your firm s capabilities with opportunities in the market and tailor your marketing materials and pitch to the needs of target clients To build lasting business relationships be persistent with follow up and appreciate the time and commitment it can take to reach a deal How BWIT and the TCS can help BWIT and the TCS can work with you on an ongoing basis to help you prepare for international markets assess your market potential find qualified contacts and resolve market access problems In addition to trade missions BWIT offers other enhanced products and services to support Canadian women entrepreneurs including a business directory an export readiness quiz and an annual newsletter Visit our website join us on LinkedIn or email us to learn more about exporting partnering and accessing unique opportunities for business women Comments Je suis le directeur de l entreprise vente des produits pharmaceutiques vétérinaire et je suis à la recherche des financements pour développer mon entreprise By ilaingar on January 24 2016 In search of bussiness partner By James on January 25 2016 Nous vous remercions d avoir communiqué avec Entreprises Canada Nous sommes toujours heureux de répondre à vos questions sur le démarrage d une petite entreprise au Canada ou sur l expansion d une entreprise existante À partir de notre site Web vous trouverez des renseignements qui pourraient vous aider à en apprendre davantage sur les options de financement pour votre entreprise Notre recherche des programmes de financement des gouvernements pourrait aussi s avérer utile dans votre cas Pour obtenir des renseignements supplémentaires veuillez communiquer avec nous ou composez sans frais le 1 888 576 4444 ATS 1 800 457 8466 à partir du Canada Merci By Canada Business on January 25 2016 Hi James Thank you for contacting Canada Business We are always happy to help you with questions about starting or growing your small business in Canada You will find information and links on our website that can help you find partners and form

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5333/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Bookkeeper or accountant? Find the right professional for your small business - Canada Business Network
    and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Bookkeeper or accountant Find the right professional for your small business Blog Bookkeeper or accountant Find the right professional for your small business January 18 2016 Tags Managing There are many things to learn as you start your business recording sales producing invoices and paying your staff are among the various duties you will need to carry out While you may be able to complete all of these tasks yourself you may eventually need to engage the services of a professional to help keep your books as your business grows How can bookkeepers help Bookkeepers maintain a business day to day records and complete operational tasks such as preparing cheques and making remittances In simple terms they keep track of the money coming in and the money going out They can help you identify if your business is making or losing money and make your business run more efficiently by keeping your financial paperwork up to date What can you do You can learn more about bookkeeping with the help of online tools books business services and software Introductory training in accounting can also be helpful if you are unfamiliar with accounting processes many local business service centres offer such basic training as do colleges You may also find that your business can benefit from using an accounting software program to keep track of financial records How can accountants help Accountants are able to analyse your business in a way that most bookkeepers cannot They can identify possible deductions or tax credits that are specific to your industry Based on what they see in your records accountants can help you make long term decisions for your business These can range from the simpler things like whether to lease equipment or buy it to the more complex issue of timing your business expansion An accountant may be aware of regulations that you or your bookkeeper may not like how long records should be kept How we can help The Canada Business Network can connect you with specialists on a variety of business topics through our confidential one on one consultations

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5332/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Operational efficiency: How to create a leaner business - Canada Business Network
    resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Operational efficiency How to create a leaner business Blog Operational efficiency How to create a leaner business January 14 2016 Tags Managing This guest blog post is provided by the Business Development Bank of Canada BDC which offers financing subordinate financing venture capital and consulting services to 30 000 small and medium sized Canadian businesses Many entrepreneurs don t suspect the extent to which waste and inefficiencies can put a brake on their profits Operational efficiency experts at the Business Development Bank of Canada BDC estimate only 15 to 20 of an employee s workday at a typical small and medium sized business is spent on purely productive activities That s no small problem in today s highly competitive marketplace Businesses that fail to continuously improve their efficiency risk falling behind leaner competitors It often becomes a matter of survival Learn how to eliminate waste But figuring out how to make your company leaner and more productive isn t easy The good news is that with some straightforward improvements you can slash waste boost productivity and reap the benefits on your bottom line A leaner operation can lower costs increase output help eliminate quality problems reduce space requirements and cut time to market It can also improve employee morale And almost any business can benefit whether in manufacturing or services To help you figure out how to make your business leaner and more productive BDC recently published a free eBook called Create a Leaner More Profitable Business A Guide for Entrepreneurs Guide provides a road map This concise guide provides step by step instructions on how to implement a continuous improvement approach in your business identify sources of waste and apply the fundamental principles of operational efficiency It also includes tips on getting buy in from your team assessing your performance and identifying operational challenges Find out The first thing you need to do and why it s crucial to your success Simple practical steps to identify sources of waste Tips and advice on how to get your team on board A little known

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5331/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Engaging Generation Y — how your business can attract Millennials - Canada Business Network
    What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Engaging Generation Y how your business can attract Millennials Blog Engaging Generation Y how your business can attract Millennials January 11 2016 Tags Marketing Generation Y consumers were born in the early 80s through the late 90s Known also as Millennials this group has often been identified as the most tech savvy and engaged generation due to its constant access to technology When developing a product or service geared toward this demographic keep in mind that Millennials rely on technology like no other group in history Social media is king with this group since this demographic is on social media make sure you are too Millennials are likely to Read reviews and ratings found on social media channels Generation Y tends to seek out the advice or opinion of members of their peer group rather than that of their parents Need quick answers from you Implementing a chat feature on your website or creating an app will make it easier for Millennials to communicate with you and your business Visit and use your website if it is easy to use and popular products are in stock A useful website goes a long way towards building loyalty This will benefit not only this group but your whole client base Read blogs on shared topics of interest Let them know that your business cares about the same things that they believe are important Leave you kudos on a job well done or an honest review of a bad interaction this may have a big impact on selecting who they might do business with in the future When developing a marketing plan for your business you may want to consult with members of your staff that represent or understand the particular needs and wants of this group Consider implementing or upgrading your technology offerings to meet the needs of Generation Y This can be done in a variety of ways Create a username and password system that automatically saves payment information Offer a variety of payment options such as debit or a mobile point of sale if your business is mobile Ensure that you offer your business contact information or chat feature on every page of your website As with all generational groups Millennials are more likely to do business with companies that think like they do Make sure that you advertise your point of view on several important issues Is your business inclusive Is your business socially responsible Include pictures of your business at community events in your social media feeds What is your business doing to

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5321/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Making CSR work for you - Canada Business Network
    CSR work for you January 7 2016 Tags Managing This guest blog post is provided by the Strategic Policy Sector SPS which provides policy leadership for Innovation Science and Economic Development and works to achieve an integrated approach to policy formulation by developing and advising on policies aimed at the growth of economic prosperity in Canada including sustainable development As an entrepreneur you may have heard of corporate social responsibility CSR but aren t sure what it means In Canada s CSR Strategy for the international extractive sector it is defined as the activities undertaken by a business to operate in an economically socially and environmentally sustainable and responsible manner According to the International Organization for Standardization ISO CSR also includes transparent and ethical behaviour by a business that exceeds legal requirements in order to address stakeholder expectations and earn a social license to operate in Canada and globally In 2015 Innovation Science and Economic Development ISED published an updated edition of Corporate Social Responsibility An Implementation Guide for Canadian Business The guide offers companies guidance on how to better integrate corporate social responsibility CSR principles and practices into your daily operations and longer term business strategies CSR principles include anti bribery and corruption and consumer safety policies CSR practices include environmental stewardship and supply chain due diligence with respect to sourcing supply from companies with good employee health and safety practices By integrating CSR principles and practices into your daily business operations your company can develop environmentally sustainable and innovative processes technologies products and services that are responsive to opportunities in new markets Since the first CSR guide was published by ISED in 2006 much has changed in how companies and countries approach the issue internationally In 2010 ISO published a new guidance standard on social responsibility ISO 26000 which helps clarify the scope of social responsibility assists businesses and organizations in translating CSR principles into effective actions and shares best practices globally relating to social responsibility This standard and the adoption of CSR related laws such as the Dodd Frank Act in the United States are changing the global investment and corporate culture with many small and medium sized enterprises SMEs and large multinational corporations taking steps to integrate CSR practices and principles into their business models In light of the changing CSR environment the new ISED guide features short case studies describing how leading Canadian firms have successfully integrated CSR practices into their business strategies and operations Additionally it provides information on new international CSR standards and a dedicated section with advice for SMEs on how to carry out low cost CSR assessments and implementation plans In preparing the guide ISED worked with Canadian companies and business associations universities and not for profit organizations including those related to indigenous business and consumers with experience in CSR gathering their perspectives and hearing their advice Every business is different but adopting effective CSR practices can be beneficial to a company s bottom line and reputation no matter what its

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5317/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Social Media Policies - Canada Business Network
    protocols for the Canada Business Network s participation in social media accounts and channels such as micro blogging sites media file sharing sites social and professional networking sites as well as blogs and discussion forums The choice to use a particular social media channel or Web 2 0 tool is driven by departmental objective and needs nature and size of audiences plus service agreements with the Government of Canada All accounts and channels are managed by the Canada Business Network Official Policy The Canada Business Network s communication in social media channels should not be considered as the authoritative source of new policy or guidance on services and programs from the Canada Business Network or the Government of Canada Any change or evolution in the official position on Government of Canada services and programs legislation guidance investigations and audits will be communicated through more traditional channels such as official publications online and offline speeches media releases statements to the traditional media and government websites Availability Accounts and channels will be updated and monitored during office hours between 9 a m to 5 p m Eastern Time Third party social media services may occasionally be unavailable and we apologize in advance for any inconvenience Content The content we contribute to social media channels is managed by the Canada Business Network By subscribing to our content you will gain access to information and educational videos on various business services for small and medium sized enterprises We may remove content which is out dated incorrect or restricted in time by licensing agreements We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause Commenting Replies and Repeats We welcome comments and questions about the content we post in social media channels where possible We appreciate hearing the voices of prospective entrepreneurs and small businesses on issues that are of importance to you and we strive to provide information that will be of interest to small businesses Unfortunately we are not able to reply individually to all the messages we receive via social media channels All replies and direct messages will be read and emerging themes or helpful suggestions will be forwarded to the relevant people at Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada We will moderate and review comments where possible based on our Commenting and Service Standards We may participate or intervene as appropriate In accordance with the rules moderators reserve the right to edit refuse or remove comments We may occasionally repeat content from other users Content we repeat does not imply endorsement by the Canada Business Network nor should it be taken as an indication of any shift in Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada s current official position Questions and Requests For general information about the Canada Business Network please consult our website or call us at Toll Free 1 888 576 4444 TTY 1 800 457 8466 Followers Friends Subscribers The Canada Business Network s decision to follow friend or subscribe does not imply endorsement of another social media account channel page

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/3692/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Third-party information liability disclaimer - Canada Business Network
    Grants contributions and financial assistance Loans and cash advances Loan guarantees Tax refunds and credits Wage subsidies Equity investments Private sector financing Sources of private sector financing Accessing equity financing Personal assets Financing from non government organizations Business Planning Social enterprises and non profits Financing More Managing Day to day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/4265/ (2016-02-14)
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