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  • Protecting your intellectual property in export markets - Canada Business Network
    sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Copyright and intellectual property Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Consider taking steps to protect your intellectual property before you export abroad Although Canada has ratified several treaties dealing with IP you are still required to officially register your IP in a foreign country before your property is protected there Copyrights are an exception to this rule When you register for copyright protection in Canada your protection is valid in any country that has signed the Berne Copyright Convention or other copyright treaties Registering your IP in a foreign country Before registering with a foreign intellectual property office conduct some research You can take advantage of resources like IP registration databases to help you identify potential partners or competitors This can also help you avoid infringing on the IP of others Registering your IP abroad is fairly straightforward Many countries are members of treaties or conventions to which Canada is also a party Quite often simply proving that your intellectual property is registered in Canada is all you need to be recognized in one of these countries For countries where there is no agreement in place you will want to look into the relevant laws and be sure you have everything you need before starting the registration process Avoid sharing any details about your intellectual property until you start the registration process Seeking professional or legal advice is recommended Learn more about protecting your IP in a foreign country Intellectual property for exporting businesses If you are an exporter find out how you can protect your

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2680/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Product licensing - Canada Business Network
    enterprises and non profits Financing More Managing Day to day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Copyright and intellectual property Product licensing Product licensing Filter by Region Region Alberta

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2776/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Why sell to the government? - Canada Business Network
    for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Selling to governments Why sell to the government Why sell to the government Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Discover the potential benefits of expanding your market and becoming a government supplier Fair business practices Even if your business is new or small you still have a chance of winning a contract with a government body because government purchases are subject to laws regulations policies and must meet trade obligations The bid or proposal that you submit will be evaluated and scored based on predetermined criteria and compared to the scores of your competitors Different governments may have different policies for example the Government of Canada must procure goods and services in a way that Enhances access and competition Treats industry fairly Gets the best value for Canadians Large market The Government of Canada alone spends over fifteen billion dollars a year on goods and services Add to that the amount spent by each and every municipal provincial and territorial government with whom you could be doing business and you have quite a large market You can even extend your business overseas and export your goods and services to foreign governments With the government being such a large potential market why don t all businesses target it It is most likely because of the regulations and activities that surround the procurement process such as Registering in specific vendor databases Watching for call to tenders or request for proposals Bidding on jobs or preparing detailed proposals Providing detailed updates or progress reports on large jobs It will be up to you to decide if doing business with the government is a good fit for your business Wide range of opportunities Governments buy a wide range of products and services Such procurement

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2758/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Preparing to sell to the government - Canada Business Network
    What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Selling to governments Preparing to sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Selling to the government can be a profitable step for many businesses Make an informed choice When seeking to enter the government market and indeed all types of markets you should do your homework and be well prepared To win a contract you must understand your target market In some provinces government organizations may include government boards councils committees commissions and publicly funded academic health and social service organizations Assess your business You must carefully assess your business resources and your strategic and competitive positioning Ask yourself what your production capacity is what your position vis à vis the competition is and what your short mid and long term plans are Take a good look at your human physical and technical resources Evaluate your research and development activities Analyze your supply and production capabilities in terms of distribution delivery and after sales service The answers to these questions will help you determine if you can tackle public markets and fulfill government contracts Study various procurement routes It can be demanding to fully understand government procurement and to properly target potential niches In large cities like Montreal Toronto and Vancouver there are several hundred public organizations that function differently for their procurement Learn to recognize the different approaches to procurement and decide whether or not to participate in them Types of procurement approaches include direct procurement the use of supplier files grouping of purchases publicly advertised tender calls or limited tendering and standing offers The plan of attack for government contracts varies from one business to the next some companies will concentrate their efforts on accessing and searching national publicly advertised tender calls others will initially approach government contracts via the local procurement route below a certain dollar value and via registration in vendor files Others will monitor government procurement for strategic purposes only that is without seeking to win contracts but simply to identify and keep track of the competition Get help to monitor opportunities Depending on your situation you could assign someone in your business to monitor these business opportunities with government or you could hire an outside market intelligence service The upside to hiring an intelligence service is that they can often provide help in a number of areas They could help you Understand the regulations surrounding government contracts

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2757/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Selling to the federal government - Canada Business Network
    credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Selling to governments Selling to the federal government Selling to the federal government Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Find information tools and help to complete the tasks related to selling to the Government of Canada Gain an understanding of how to sell to the government how to register your business as a supplier and find seminars on doing business with the government On this page Register to be a supplier Register as a supplier for a wide range of goods and services purchased by the federal government Register as a supplier Do you want to sell to the Government of Canada Find out how to register as a supplier and add your business to the database Centralized Professional Services ePortal If you are a professional or a specialist you can register your business in this database to conduct business with the Government of Canada SELECT Do you have a construction architectural or engineering services business Register in this database to become an approved supplier to the Government of Canada Buyandsell gc ca the procurement process Learn the ins and outs of the federal government procurement process how it works what the government buys how you can register for standing offers or become a pre qualified supplier How to prepare a bid Use this guide to help you bid on government opportunities so that you can sell your goods or services to the government The procurement process Contact Government of Canada departments and agencies for contracting opportunities and promote your products and services to them What the government buys From airplanes to paper clips the Government of Canada buys many products and services Learn more about what you can sell to the Government of Canada Find bidding opportunities proposals and contracts Learn how to bid for government tenders write proposals and promote your goods and services Tenders Government of Canada Find opportunities to sell your products or services to the Federal Government through buyandsell gc ca Bid on opportunities The bidding process Find out about contract bidding opportunities and the bidding process used by Public Works and Government Services Canada Build in Canada Innovation Program Access opportunities to sell your innovative products or services to federal government departments Pre Qualified Innovations Learn about the process when submitting your proposal for the Build

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2780/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Selling to provincial, territorial and municipal governments - Canada Business Network
    government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Selling to governments Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type As a business owner residing in one province or territory you can still compete for government contracts in other regions of the country Take advantage of the many opportunities for selling goods and services to provincial and territorial governments across the country On this page All of Canada Interprovincial and Interterritorial trade Find information on selling your goods and services to provincial and territorial governments barrier free Alberta Alberta Purchasing Connection Find opportunities to sell your products or services to the Government of Alberta and to other agencies British Columbia Selling to the BC Government Every year the BC Government buys a wide range of goods and services from businesses of all sizes and types Your business could be one of them Manitoba Selling to the Manitoba Government Extend your target market by selling to the Government of Manitoba Aboriginal Procurement Initiative Applies only to Manitoba Your aboriginal business could benefit from advantageous procurement practices from the Government of Manitoba Sell your product or service to the City of Winnipeg Applies only to Manitoba You can learn about bid opportunities for all City of Winnipeg purchases New Brunswick Procurement Services New Brunswick Opportunities Network Find opportunities to sell your goods and services to government and other public sector bodies Newfoundland and Labrador Supplier Development Program Applies only to Newfoundland and Labrador Learn how to identify and access public sector supply opportunities Tenders Selling to the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Find out how you can bid on opportunities for selling goods and services to the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador and to the private sector Northwest Territories Doing business with the Government of the Northwest Territories Find opportunities to sell your products to the Government of the NWT NWT Business Incentive Policy Applies only to Northwest Territories You must register your business if you are interested in providing goods and services to the Government of the Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Procurement Services Nova Scotia Find tender notices for goods services and construction work from Nova Scotia government departments and public sector organizations Nova Scotia Online Service for Business Applies only to Nova Scotia Use this online service to apply for manage and pay for your Nova Scotia business registrations permits and licenses Nunavut Doing Business with the Government of Nunavut Find out how your Inuit or Nunavut owned business can provide goods and services to the Government of Nunavut Nunavummi Nangminiqaqtunik Ikajuuti procurement Applies only to Nunavut By

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2781/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Selling to foreign governments - Canada Business Network
    times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Selling to governments Selling to foreign governments Selling to foreign governments Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Expand your market by selling your goods or services to governments of foreign countries Trade agreements Trade agreements make it easier for Canadian suppliers to sell to governments outside of Canada by eliminating tariffs and providing equal access to contracts of certain dollar values Details on these agreements can be found on the following sites Trade agreements Government procurement Learn about Canada s main trade agreements and how their procurement provisions may affect your procurement contract Government procurement international trade agreements Get details on all the free trade agreements covering government procurement that Canada has signed as well as agreements under negotiation Services to help you sell to foreign governments Find services and organizations that can help you become a supplier to foreign governments Become an exporter Get help accessing contracts for infrastructure or defence materials and services from foreign governments AusTender Find business opportunities annual procurement plans and contracts to do business with the Australian Government SIMAP European public procurement Find information on European public procurement and opportunities to do business with the European Union and its member states Selling to the U S Government The U S government is one of the world s largest customer To become one of its suppliers you need to know the ins and outs of the U S government

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2807/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Government procurement glossary of terms - Canada Business Network
    Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Selling to governments Government procurement glossary of terms Government procurement glossary of terms Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type You may come across unfamiliar terms when looking for information about selling to a specific government body These organizations can have different procurement policies and use different terminologies from each other This glossary should help you with your research Bid An indication of willingness to buy or sell goods or services or to undertake a task at a specific price and within a specific timeframe Business Number A unique nine digit business number that is given to your registered business by the Canada Revenue Agency as an identifier Buyandsell gc ca A free online tendering tool that helps you identify opportunities to sell your products and services or submit proposals to the Federal Government Call for Tender see Request for Proposal Call up A business that holds a standing offer to supply goods or services to the government receives a call up when the goods are required Commodity Goods and services that are bought and sold Contract Contracts describe a pre defined requirement or scope of work and set the terms and conditions of the work or deliverables including predetermined quantities prices or pricing basis and delivery date Invitation to Bid see Request for Proposal Procurement Business Number You are given this number when you register your business in the Supplier Registration Information service using your Canada Revenue Agency Business Number Proposal A submission by one party to supply certain goods or services to another Unlike an offer a proposal is not a promise or commitment but if accepted by the other party its proposer is expected to follow through and negotiate for the creation of a binding contract If submitted in response to a Request for Proposal it normally constitutes a bid Request for Information A request made by the government to the supplier community for information and feedback on a proposed procurement strategy prior to a Request for Proposal Request for Proposal Depending on factors such as the type of work to be done and the value of the goods to be delivered different terms are used to basically ask you to show your interest in a

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2756/ (2016-02-14)
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