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  • Considering bankruptcy - Canada Business Network
    sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Considering bankruptcy Considering bankruptcy Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type If your business is a sole proprietorship or a partnership the assets of the business cannot be held separately from your personal assets and therefore a small business bankruptcy is in effect a personal bankruptcy If your business is incorporated it is considered by law to be an independent legal entity and therefore gives you liability protection If you declare bankruptcy you surrender everything you own to a trustee in bankruptcy in exchange for the elimination of your debts and you get a chance to start over Keep in mind however that your credit report will be affected making it harder to get a loan in the future and you are required to perform certain duties like reporting your income to your trustee every month Filing for bankruptcy should be your last resort Before taking that step consider the alternatives Alternatives to bankruptcy If you are having financial difficulties and are considering filing for bankruptcy first consider other options These include reworking your budget consolidating loans selling assets or taking more formal actions such as a Division 1 Proposal where you work with a trustee to offer to pay your creditors a percentage of what you owe them over a period of time Alternatives to bankruptcy If you feel that your financial situation is out of control there are several steps towards financial stability that you can take today Farm Debt Mediation Service Access the free services of a financial consultant

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2817/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Permits and Licences Search - Canada Business Network
    Market research Labour and employment data Demographics Industry sector data Canadian economy International markets Importing and exporting Environment Site Selection General research and statistics Planning More Financing Find financing Government grants and financing Grants contributions and financial assistance Loans and cash advances Loan guarantees Tax refunds and credits Wage subsidies Equity investments Private sector financing Sources of private sector financing Accessing equity financing Personal assets Financing from non government organizations Business Planning Social enterprises and non profits Financing More Managing Day to day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/search/stp1/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Turning business conversations into opportunities - Canada Business Network
    growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Turning business conversations into opportunities Blog Turning business conversations into opportunities February 8 2016 Tags Marketing If you are a small business owner chances are you are a self starter and have confidence in your business and in yourself But what if you are an entrepreneur who is less outgoing How do you get a good conversation started Whether you are new to business or expanding the following tips can help you start meaningful conversations that can lead to business growth Get out there You don t have to attend trade shows or conferences to strike up conversations if you may be more comfortable at smaller events like networking groups Keep in mind that your prospective contacts will be fewer in number the smaller the event Grab people s attention Have a quick meaningful story about your business that will capture people s attention Once you have gone through the necessary introductions offer up your story Remember to show interest in what other business owners have to say They might be looking for new leads and potential partnerships too Gauge the crowd Before talking about your business make sure that you understand your audience Don t rely on humour if the crowd seems more serious don t go into great detail about what you do if you have limited time listen before speaking is a good approach Give and collect information Get business cards or phone numbers or friend people on social media You and your business will be ready when a potential opportunity presents itself Make sure that your business website is easily accessible through your social media channels and that all visitors to your website can sign up for email subscriptions Through conversations with other entrepreneurs you may be able to get some hints on how you could help them They could let you know that they Are unhappy with their current provider Want to expand but are missing resources or skills Ready to hear what sets you apart from the crowd and need your help Find a way to align your business with

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5349/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Understand telemarketing rules for compliance - Canada Business Network
    opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Understand telemarketing rules for compliance Blog Understand telemarketing rules for compliance February 4 2016 Tags Marketing Regulations This guest blog is provided by the Canadian Radio television and Telecommunications Commission CRTC who is responsible for regulating and supervising broadcasting and telecommunications in the public interest Do you use telemarketing to promote products or services If so are you following the CRTC s Unsolicited Telecommunications Rules the Rules If you do conduct telemarketing or intend to in the future it is important to know what the Rules are The National Do Not Call List DNCL Rules are essential and are designed to strike a balance by reducing the number of unwanted telemarketing calls and faxes to Canadians who have indicated they don t want to receive unsolicited telecommunications while still allowing some telemarketing to occur The Rules also include the Telemarketing Rules and Automatic Dialing and Announcing Device ADAD Rules Although some calls may be exempted all telemarketers are required to maintain an internal do not call list and respect the consumer s request not to be called Please visit the CRTC website and see Phone Telemarketing and Unwanted Calls then consult the section called A Telemarketer s Responsibility to determine whether your organization is subject to the Rules It is the responsibility of all telemarketers to register with the National DNCL Operator and they may also be required to purchase a subscription to the National DNCL which comprises a list of telecommunication numbers of Canadian consumers who have chosen to reduce the number of unsolicited telecommunications they receive It is up to telemarketers to ensure that they do not call the home phone number cellular number or fax number of Canadians who have registered with the National DNCL Operator The CRTC is responsible for investigating complaints If a telemarketer is found to be in violation of the Rules the telemarketer could receive an Administrative Monetary Penalty of up to 1 500 per violation for

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5343/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Keeping your teleworking employee in touch with your business - Canada Business Network
    growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Keeping your teleworking employee in touch with your business Blog Keeping your teleworking employee in touch with your business February 1 2016 Tags Employers As more tasks and projects can be done digitally or performed online a cost saving measure for employers can be to hire remote workers or teleworkers Teleworkers are people who do not work in your physical office location but rather work offsite from their homes or other locations Having an employee work remotely could reduce your office space and equipment costs as well as your energy consumption Hiring a remote employee may also allow a business manager to select the most qualified candidate from anywhere in the country Teleworkers may also allow you to widen your network of contacts and provide you with a different perspective or ideas If they are located in another province they could also provide insight into the business climate of that area Teleworkers can be more productive as they do not have the same potential interruptions that may occur in the regular office environment Before making a decision to hire remote workers in different time zones or different provinces you should consider potential challenges Some things to consider when hiring a remote worker from outside your province include Set up your meetings to accommodate workers in all time zones Investigate labour laws in the province where your remote worker is located regulations may differ where health and safety are concerned there may be tax implications overtime regulations and other different employment standards Ensure adequate visual communications and file sharing technologies are in place to allow you and your office staff to be able to work and connect with the teleworker Establish security and privacy controls on both parties networks Set clear goals expectations and deadlines for the remote worker and ensure that you regularly follow up on the progress of their tasks or projects Schedule regular communication time and include social conversations the same way you would if the person was in office examples asking about their weekend children activities

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5342/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Business life cycle management: what's your next move? - Canada Business Network
    innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Business life cycle management what s your next move Blog Business life cycle management what s your next move January 25 2016 Tags Managing Every organization goes through a series of stages between conception and closure Knowing what you need to focus on at each stage can help you better prepare for the future Ask yourself these questions What life cycle stage is my business in right now Where do I want my business to go next What should I focus on in order to be ready for the next stage Some of the things you may want to consider Development Before starting you will want to focus on research planning and financing It can be difficult for new businesses to succeed under the best of circumstances so take the time you need to plan well and show potential investors you have what it takes to succeed This sets a strong foundation for your business Startup Once you ve laid the groundwork you will be focused on things like registering finding a location acquiring inventory and hiring employees Cash flow management is crucial at this stage Keep your expectations in check Make reliable sales forecasts and control your costs this will help keep your business healthy and allow you to establish a strong customer base Growth In order to grow and to improve productivity your business must innovate with things like outsourcing and automating Effective management and good decision making are key factors Market research can help you stay competitive and gain new customers Expansion This new period of growth generally requires more research more planning and more funding than earlier stages Whether you re looking at developing new products expanding into new markets or creating new distribution channels you must do your homework Consider joint ventures or new investors partners whose interests and experiences complement your own to help you deal with the pace of rapid growth Maturity When you ve neared or reached market saturation your challenge is to maintain the market share you have You can do this by focusing on promotion and customer satisfaction fine tuning your processes and adapting to evolving industry standards Exit Long before you plan to retire or move

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/entry/5336/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Blog - Canada Business Network
    business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Blog Blog Canada Business Network Blog How to prepare a winning business loan request February 11 2016 0 comments Discover step by step advice on how to get the business loan you need to finance your company s profitable growth and success Turning business conversations into opportunities February 08 2016 0 comments Whether you are new to business or are a seasoned entrepreneur these tips can help you start conversations that can lead to business growth Understand telemarketing rules for compliance February 04 2016 0 comments Do you use telemarketing to promote your products or services Make sure you know the rules Keeping your teleworking employee in touch with your business February 01 2016 0 comments Things to consider when managing employees who telework Business life cycle management what s your next move January 25 2016 0 comments Knowing what to focus on as you move through the business life cycle will help you transition from one stage to the next Canadian women owned businesses can leverage trade missions to develop business abroad January 21 2016 8 comments Join the Business Women s June 2016 Trade Mission to Atlanta and Orlando for exclusive market access Bookkeeper or accountant Find the right professional for your small business January 18 2016 0 comments Do you need a bookkeeper or an accountant for your business Find out which one you might need and why Operational efficiency How to create a leaner business January 14 2016 0 comments Learn how to implement a continuous improvement approach identify sources of waste and apply the principles of operational efficiency Engaging Generation Y how your business can attract Millennials January 11 2016 1 comment What makes Millennials so different

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/blog/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Terms and conditions - Canada Business Network
    storage Some examples of what digital markers do are as follows They allow a website to recognize a previous visit each time the visitor accesses the site They track what information is viewed on a site which helps website administrators ensure visitors find what they are looking for The Canada Business Network uses sessional and persistent digital markers on some portions of its website During your on line visit your browser exchanges data with the Canada Business Network s Web server The digital markers used do not allow the Canada Business Network to identify individuals You may adjust your browser settings to reject digital markers including cookies if you so choose However it may affect your ability to interact with the Canada Business Network s website Web analytics Web analytics is the collection analysis measurement and reporting of data about Web traffic and visits for purposes of understanding and optimizing Web usage Information in digital markers may be used for the purpose of web analytics to remember your online interactions with the Canada Business Network s website The Canada Business Network uses Google Analytics to improve its web site When your computer requests a Canada Business Network Web page our institution collects the following types of information for Web analytics Originating IP address Date and time of the request Type of browser used Page s visited The Canada Business Network uses Google Analytics and the information collected is disclosed to Google Inc an external third party service provider Your IP address is anonymized prior to being stored on the service provider s servers in order to help safeguard your privacy The information collected is de personalized by activating the anonymization feature in Google Analytics Data collected for Web analytics purposes goes outside of Canada to the United States and may be subject to the governing legislation of that country the USA Patriot Act Information used for the purpose of Web analytics is collected pursuant to Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada s enabling statutes Such data may be used for communications and information technology statistical purposes audit evaluation research planning and reporting For more information on how your privacy is safeguarded in relation to web analytics see the Standard on Privacy and Web Analytics Protecting the security of Government of Canada websites The Canada Business Network employs software programs to monitor network traffic to identify unauthorized attempts to upload or change information or otherwise cause damage This software receives and records the IP address of the computer that has contacted our website the date and time of the visit and the pages visited We make no attempt to link these addresses with the identity of individuals visiting our site unless an attempt to damage the site has been detected This information is collected pursuant to section 161 of the Financial Administration Act The information may be shared with appropriate law enforcement authorities if suspected criminal activities are detected Such information may be used for network security related statistical purposes audit evaluation research planning and reporting and is included in personal information bank PSU 939 Security Incidents Inquiring about these practices Any questions comments concerns or complaints you may have regarding the administration of the Privacy Act and privacy policies regarding the Canada Business Network s Web presence may be directed to our Access to Information and Privacy Coordinator by email to kimberly eadie ic gc ca by calling 613 952 2088 or writing to Information and Privacy Rights Administration Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada 2nd Floor West Tower C D Howe Building 235 Queen Street Ottawa ON K1A 0H5 If you are not satisfied with our response to your privacy concern you may wish to contact the Office of the Privacy Commissioner by telephone at 1 800 282 1376 Using files located on non Government of Canada servers To improve the functionality of Government of Canada websites certain files such as open source libraries images and scripts may be delivered automatically to your browser via a trusted third party server or content delivery network The delivery of these files is intended to provide a seamless user experience by speeding response times and avoiding the need for each visitor to download these files Where applicable specific privacy statements covering these files are included in our Privacy Notice Providing content in Canada s official languages The Official Languages Act the Official Languages Communications with and Services to the Public Regulations and Treasury Board policy requirements establish when we use both English and French to provide services to or communicate with members of the public When there is no obligation to provide information in both official languages content may be available in one official language only Information provided by organizations not subject to the Official Languages Act is in the language s provided Information provided in a language other than English or French is only for the convenience of our visitors Linking to non Government of Canada websites Links to websites not under the control of the Government of Canada including those to our social media accounts are provided solely for the convenience of our website visitors We are not responsible for the accuracy currency or reliability of the content of such websites The Government of Canada does not offer any guarantee in that regard and is not responsible for the information found through these links nor does it endorse the sites and their content Visitors should also be aware that information offered by non Government of Canada sites to which this website links is not subject to the Privacy Act or the Official Languages Act and may not be accessible to persons with disabilities The information offered may be available only in the language s used by the sites in question With respect to privacy visitors should research the privacy policies of these non government websites before providing personal information Ownership and usage of content provided on this site Materials on this website were produced and or compiled by the Canada

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/3682/ (2016-02-14)
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