archive-ca.com » CA » E » ENTREPRISESCANADA.CA

Total: 1165

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Organizational design - Canada Business Network
    Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Day to day operations Organizational design Organizational design Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Organizational design is the way in which you set up your business employees information and technologies to best meet your business objectives How you structure your organization has a major impact on how well it functions There is no single best organizational design for all small businesses Each business structure is as unique as the organization it represents Here are some key factors that you might consider when planning the design of your business Purpose What is the purpose of your business Your first step is to clearly recognize what it is that you want to achieve Think of the big picture Take a step back and get a bird s eye view of your operation Strategy What strategy can you implement to reach your goal You want your employees to make decisions based on clear guidelines directed to achieve your purpose You need to have administrative systems technology and information in place that will help your employees succeed Division of labour How can you divvy up employees responsibilities to best meet your needs Once you ve determined the departments and roles that are needed to fulfill your purpose you ll want to consider where to position your employees in order for them to thrive Authority responsibility and control Once your departments are set and you have your employees in place how will you structure your chain of command Ultimately there is only one boss you However you will have to delegate decision making responsibilities to department heads managers forepersons etc Be sure to limit your number of decision makers Employees should always be clear about their roles and responsibilities and who their supervisor is Communication How can you best facilitate communication It is vastly important that the entirety of your team is on the same page When employees feel they are in the loop they recognize that they are an important part of

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2833/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Environment and business - Canada Business Network
    day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Day to day operations Environment and business Environment and business Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2860/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Exiting your business - Canada Business Network
    and non profits Financing More Managing Day to day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Day to day operations Exiting your business Exiting your business Filter by Region Region

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2859/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive



  • Employees - Canada Business Network
    territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Employees Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Access information on recruiting hiring and managing relationships with your employees and learn about your ongoing responsibilities such as payroll pension taxes compensation health and safety Hiring employees Know your obligations and opportunities when it comes to hiring employees Your obligations Payroll Learn how to deduct Canada Pension Plan contributions EI premiums and income tax from your employees pay and report to CRA Employee or self employed Discover how this guide can help you determine your own or your workers employment status Employer responsibilities The payroll steps As an employer you must follow a number of steps for managing your employees payroll Understand your obligations Record of Employment on the Web ROE Web Use this secure application to create submit and print Records of Employment ROEs via the Internet in preparation for the interruption of employee earnings ROE Web Benefits Watch this Service Canada video to find out the benefits to your business when you file Records of Employment online T4 Information for employers Find out how to complete and file a T4 slip a form that states the wages paid to and taxes withheld from an employee and obtain downloadable and printable forms Employment standards Find out about your obligations related to wages vacation and other leave statutory holidays hours of work and overtime Employment equity and human rights Find out how to create a workplace that is free from discrimination and harassment Workplace health and safety regulations Find out what you need to do to ensure the health and safety of your employees while they are at work Health and safety Find information about your responsibilities concerning occupational health and safety in federally regulated industries including what you can do to prevent accidents Your obligations when an employee leaves Find out what your legal obligations are when it comes to an employee leaving your business either temporarily or permanently Quebec s Competency Act in French only Applies only to Québec Learn about the obligations related to these regulations especially if your annual payroll expenditures are more than 1 000 000 Managing your employees Keeping employee records Keeping employee records on topics like salaries and job skills can help you administer payroll and plan training and allow

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2835/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hiring employees - Canada Business Network
    intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Hiring employees Hiring employees Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Know your obligations and opportunities when it comes to hiring employees from recruitment to payroll to tax returns and familiarize yourself with current labour market conditions When you hire someone to work for you there are certain government regulations you must follow from recruitment to payroll to tax returns There are also certain things you can do that will help you find and hire the best candidates for the jobs you are offering Before you begin hiring you may want to familiarize yourself with the current labour market conditions and find out what services are available in your area to help you with your search It s important to have a system for identifying the requirements of the positions you want to fill as well as policies for recruitment and selection that are inclusive and fair with an aim to hiring the most qualified people and achieving equality in your workplace On this page Steps for hiring Establish the requirements of the position Advertise the job Interview candidates Perform background and reference checks Select the successful candidate Orient the new employee Start a file for the employee Hiring requirements Find resources that can help you comply with the standards and regulations regarding recruiting selecting and hiring employees Hiring employees Learn about the steps involved in hiring employees from developing the job requirements to screening and testing applicants to making an offer Wage subsidies Are high wage expectations making you reluctant to put up that Help Wanted sign A wage subsidy program can put the perfect employee within your reach Finding employees Job Bank Advertise and manage your job openings free of charge and at your own convenience and find qualified job candidates through the job match tool Recruit and manage salespeople Learn where to find salespeople the importance of the recruitment interview and how to institute a commission structure to encourage high sales Hiring foreign workers If your business is facing a labour shortage or you are unable to find the talent your business needs why not look outside of Canada Teleworkers Having a difficult time recruiting qualified employees A teleworker an employee who works outside your office may be a great option for you WORKink Find services and resources that can help you hire persons with disabilities and create an inclusive work environment Job Bank Employer resources Resources

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2837/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Keeping employee records - Canada Business Network
    customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Keeping employee records Keeping employee records Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type If you have employees keeping records on everything from their salaries to their job skills can help you administer your payroll and plan training The information you keep on each employee should include Education and personal data Work history Salary Benefits Job classifications Skills By making this information available to employees through a secure internal website you can save time answering questions they may have with respect to their own information With self service your employees can log in and check on a variety of things from how many days of leave they have used to whether your group insurance will pay for their eyeglasses Using an internal website for record keeping can help you to keep track of the pay and performance of each employee as well as the dates for things like renewing training licences Since employees only need a web browser to access their own information and add changes to it you will also find it easier and less expensive to support employees working in remote locations Besides being easy to use the human resources software you choose to use for record keeping should be customized to give you Control over what your employees can see or change Security so that personal data like salaries can only be seen by authorized personnel Customizable email messages that your human resources staff can use to save time The ability to link to related websites for forms and insurance information User friendly technology that works with your web

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2634/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Teleworkers - Canada Business Network
    Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Teleworkers Teleworkers Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Is your business located in a remote area that limits your ability to recruit top notch employees Perhaps you want to keep overhead costs down by reducing your office space If so you might consider hiring teleworkers employees who work outside your office usually from home Some of the benefits teleworkers can bring to your organization are Increased recruitment pool Your ability to hire is not limited to a specific region Employee productivity and morale Giving your employees the flexibility to work outside of regular office hours and to avoid a daily commute helps reduce absenteeism Having fewer workplace interruptions allows your employees to produce more Reduced costs You may spend less on things like office space parking utilities and relocation While the advantages are many you ll want to carefully consider how you can implement and manage teleworkers within your organization Keep these things in mind Management As you are unable to monitor a teleworker on site you may need to pay extra attention to things like workload and results rather than processes Set up costs The home office of a teleworker must provide that employee with the ability to properly communicate with your office and access all necessary information technology networks Liability The home office of

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2646/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Managing employees during tough times - Canada Business Network
    Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Managing employees during tough times Managing employees during tough times Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type As a small business owner you will be faced with difficult choices during turbulent times like an economic downturn or a decrease in demand for your product or service In order to stay competitive you must streamline operations and offer creative responses to external threats It is critical to encourage innovation and make the kinds of changes that are necessary to ensure that your business succeeds today and in the future When times are tough business owners often resort to layoffs as a cost saving measure However laying off employees can damage your business and impair its ability to succeed in the long term Layoffs incur direct costs including severance pay administration fees and legal fees which immediately affect your business bottom line There are also less tangible costs like the skills knowledge and experience that are lost when an employee is let go In the face of layoffs employees often experience lower morale and productivity higher levels of absenteeism and job related stress and a loss of faith in the business Your best employees may start looking for other opportunities And when business does improve the costs of finding and training new employees are very high Innovative cost cutting and restructuring measures can help you reposition your business and define how business will be conducted in the future without the need to let valuable employees go Work Sharing If business is slow you can offer at least 2 of your core workers a temporarily reduced work week instead of laying them off Alternate work arrangements and work hour reduction Applies only to Québec Take advantage of advice and funding to help your preserve jobs Think long term Where possible avoid layoffs Recruiting new employees when your business rebounds can be expensive and can put your reputation as an employer at risk Reduce employee costs through work reorganization Multi tasking and learning new skills allow your staff to support the needs of your organization now and in the future Use recognition and rewards

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2721/ (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive



  •