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  • Hiring requirements - Canada Business Network
    Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Regulations Regulated business activities Human resources regulations Hiring requirements Hiring requirements Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Whether you are hiring a new employee or promoting one from within your organization there are things you must do to comply with government standards and regulations regarding recruitment One of these requirements is that your recruitment and interviewing practices be fair and non discriminatory The Report on Hirings program is a voluntary verification program where you can report hirings and recalls for your organization to help reduce employment insurance fraud Find information and guidance on your obligations I want to know my obligations If you are an organization or business that is regulated by the federal government find out more about your obligations under the Canadian Human Rights Act Your responsibilities with respect to an employee s social insurance number You must ask to see a new employee s social insurance number SIN card or letter within three days of them starting Keep the number secure and use it for income related purposes only Personal tax credits return You should ask new employees to complete a TD1 form for personal tax credits to determine how much to deduct from their pay Report on Hirings If you hire often you could help maintain the integrity of the Employment Insurance program by submitting monthly information to the government Human resources Quebec in French only Applies only to Québec Keep informed of your rights and responsibilities when hiring and managing employees as well as when their employment ends Recruiting in four steps in French only Applies only to Québec Learn more about your rights and obligations when it comes to recruiting employees and discover which tools and resources can guide you throughout the process Employment Standards Tool Kit for Employers Applies only to Alberta If you are an employer in Alberta find out how to comply with the Employment Standards Code and Regulation You

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2720/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Hiring foreign workers - Canada Business Network
    Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Hiring employees Hiring foreign workers Hiring foreign workers Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type If your business is facing a labour shortage or you are unable to find the talent your business needs why not look outside of Canada The following programs can help you hire the right match for your business General info If your business is facing a labour shortage you could hire a foreign worker to fill the gap The worker must have a valid permit to work in Canada and other conditions may apply Find out more Hire foreign workers If you re interested in hiring foreign workers on a permanent or temporary basis find out which program is best for your business needs and other related information Temporary Foreign Worker Program Learn how you can hire a foreign worker on a temporary basis when Canadian citizens and permanent residents are not available to do the job Express Entry Express Entry aims to facilitate matches between Canadian businesses and skilled immigrants who wish to work in Canada permanently Hiring foreign workers Construction industry Find out how to assess foreign experience skills and credentials Learn how to make job offers develop orientation programs and retain workers Hireimmigrants ca Roadmap Find information and resources to help you find and hire immigrants to fill positions in your business in Canada Nominee programs Many regions have nominee programs where the government nominates individuals who wish to immigrate to Canada and settle in their province or territory Some programs aim to attract foreign investors and entrepreneurs from around the world while others serve to fill labour gaps that businesses may be facing Provincial Nominee Program for Business Manitoba Applies only to Manitoba Immigrate to Manitoba and be your own boss Manitoba is open for business Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program for employers Applies only to Saskatchewan Are you an employer unable to fill your labour needs domestically Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program Entrepreneurs Applies only to Saskatchewan Are you interested in moving to Saskatchewan to buy or start a business You can get assistance with the immigration and settlement process Newfoundland and Labrador Provincial Nominee Program Applies only to Newfoundland and Labrador Receive assistance to recruit immigrants or find an immigrant buyer for your Newfoundland and Labrador business Nova Scotia Nominee Program Applies only to Nova Scotia You may be able to fill the labour gap at your business by recruiting a skilled immigrant BC Provincial Nominee Program Entrepreneur Immigration Applies only to British Columbia If you are an entrepreneur ready to invest and actively manage a business in

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/3969/ (2016-02-14)
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  • YuWIN Yukon Work Information Network - Canada Business Network
    and employment data Demographics Industry sector data Canadian economy International markets Importing and exporting Environment Site Selection General research and statistics Planning More Financing Find financing Government grants and financing Grants contributions and financial assistance Loans and cash advances Loan guarantees Tax refunds and credits Wage subsidies Equity investments Private sector financing Sources of private sector financing Accessing equity financing Personal assets Financing from non government organizations Business Planning Social enterprises and non profits Financing More Managing Day to day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/program/2976/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Privacy and your business - Canada Business Network
    intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Government Regulations Regulated business activities Privacy and your business Privacy and your business Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type The way you treat your clients information matters In Canada most businesses have to comply with the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act PIPEDA which regulates how you may collect use and disclose the personal information you gather as you do business Some provinces territories and industry sectors are subject to other regulations Understand your privacy obligations under PIPEDA Having a sound privacy policy helps you build a stronger relationship with your clients The greater the measures you take to protect your clients information the greater the trust and potential loyalty they will have for your organization Your privacy responsibilities A guide for businesses and organizations Get detailed information on the rules for the management of personal information in the private sector Privacy quiz for business Take this mini quiz to better understand the privacy regulations that affect your business Determining the appropriate form of consent under PIPEDA Find out how to get permission to collect use or disclose someone s personal information depending on how sensitive it is and how it will be used Your customer s driver s licence card Do you need it If you ask your customers to present identification you should know what you can and cannot copy off a driver s licence Guidelines for processing personal data across borders If your data will be housed or processed outside of Canada you need to ensure that you take reasonable measures to protect that information Protecting employee records If your business is in the North or if you conduct business within federally regulated sectors PIPEDA applies to your employee records Dealing with privacy breaches and complaints under PIPEDA What happens if your business does not comply with PIPEDA or if you somehow fail to safeguard the information you collected This information will help you understand what to do next 10 tips for avoiding complaints to the Privacy Commissioner Learn the steps you can take to respect privacy and avoid the weight of complaints and the negative attention an investigation could bring to your business Information about privacy breaches and how to respond Find out what a privacy breach is how the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada can help and the steps you should take when reporting a breach in privacy Organizations Guide to Complaint Investigations

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2694/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Types of human resources administration tools - Canada Business Network
    and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government Selling to provincial territorial and municipal governments Selling to foreign governments Government procurement glossary of terms Considering bankruptcy Government grants and financing Social enterprises and non profits Government More You are here Home Managing Employees Implementing tools for human resources administration Types of human resources administration tools Types of human resources administration tools Filter by Region Region Alberta British Columbia Manitoba Newfoundland and Labrador New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Quebec Saskatchewan Yukon and or Business type Take a look at some of the components you might want to include as part of a human resources information system designed to fit your needs You can tailor reliable off the shelf human resources tools Choosing the best technologies however is not easy consider this as carefully as you would any other process implementation Look for affordable solutions to manage different functions including Basic employee information Attendance records Benefits and compensation Recruiting and employee skills Payroll No off the shelf human resources information system will meet all of your needs but a simple one that meets most of them may be able to grow with your business Be realistic about your requirements so that you don t spend more time and money than necessary Human resources information systems Some products are offered as individual applications while others are packaged as a complete system An integrated system usually consists of human resources management payroll processing and recruiting administration The main advantage of these systems is the single point for data entry and for retrieval and analysis in a common format When the human resources department applies a premium change to benefits for example the information is instantly available to the payroll department and automatically reflected in payroll deductions What s in a human resources information system These are some of the most common elements found in a human resources information system Employee benefits Employee records and profiles job classifications Productivity data Organizational policies and procedures Training and development policies Succession planning information The types of reports that can be generated automatically include Employee absenteeism attendance performance records histories Payroll records Human resources plans Job evaluation data turnover data applicant database Skills inventories job descriptions specifications and postings Health and safety reports and data disability records Pension plan information benefits utilization Union contract details employment equity data What to look for in an effective human resources information system Efficient navigation methods Tools to track employee compensation history job information and performance reviews Time saving administration of benefits plans

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2626/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Investing in outsourcing or automating internal processes - Canada Business Network
    offer complete packages of HR services but others let you choose from a menu of options that include Payroll processing and administration issuing paycheques and withholding or deducting taxes insurance and health premiums and pension contributions Employee benefits and plans health dental life and disability insurance pensions Human resources management recruiting selection termination salary reviews job descriptions Risk management workers compensation dispute resolution safety inspection office policies and procedures employee manuals Incentive design and implementation Is outsourcing right for your business The outsourcing decision depends on the size of your business your human resource practices and the business climate With fewer than 100 employees you may not have the resources for an in house HR department outsourcing may be a viable solution When activities such as recruitment are required only periodically it doesn t make sense to hire permanent experts If your business has at least 12 employees a professional employer organization could be useful With fewer than 12 employees you may do better with online services Should your current HR practices differ from those of similar businesses in your industry outsourcing may be costly because the service provider would need to adapt to your in house process The flexibility of outsourcing may appeal to you if your business faces financial uncertainty or operates in a volatile industry You may be able to respond faster to changing resource needs by eliminating excess fixed costs Outsourcing benefits and risks Before outsourcing human resources functions compare the potential benefits and risks When you assess possible outcomes and results consider your size resources goals and environment Benefits of outsourcing Risk management By outsourcing to a professional employer organization you can hand over the legal responsibilities of managing federal and provincial employment laws Outsourcers may also be more objective than in house HR employees when dealing with sensitive issues Human resources focus Outsourcing routine functions can free your HR employees to focus on strategic planning activities while retaining overall control Cost savings Service providers are large purchasers of benefits and other packages often receiving discounted rates that they then pass on to you By outsourcing you can also save on the costs of purchased software installation and maintenance such as upgrades debugging and licensing Risks of outsourcing Impact on core functions One drawback is a lack of personal interaction By taking a personal interest in employee well being in house HR employees may be more effective in encouraging employee retention and dealing with more sensitive workplace issues Human resources competencies Without developing in house HR expertise you may remain dependent on external providers Will you have the skills to determine your human resources needs or assess the effectiveness of an outsider What if your business continues to grow Accountability You end up outsourcing the final decision to hire fire and discipline employees it may be more difficult to motivate reward and retain employees when lines of authority are blurred or when expectations are inconsistent Security issues Concerns may include protected access to the data

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2627/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Managing change - Canada Business Network
    If your employees trust you they tend to experience greater levels of satisfaction and co operation at work Establish open trusting and cooperative relationships by engaging your employees communicate with them empower them to make decisions and support their choices on a regular basis In turn they will be more inclined to trust your instincts when you introduce change to the workplace Employee status Employment status can determine loyalty so your part time seasonal or contract employees may feel less committed to your corporate goals and proposed changes Include them in planning meetings and training sessions or when you send out information It is a good idea to involve all parties affected by an organizational change in the change management process Organizational culture Your long term employees often set the standards of acceptable attitudes and behaviour within your business They may do so inadvertently nevertheless their influence on organizational culture is important You should manage their participation carefully so that they do not impede change With a culture of teamwork established prior to introducing change you have a solid foundation upon which to build your change effort In this case your employees are accustomed to teamwork and already share the co operative attitude necessary for your success Leadership Your role as a leader is important to the success of implemented changes Implementing a new system is not a minor operational issue Changes in your business processes are strategic in nature so anyone in a leadership role within your business should support them Management leadership Learn how to build strong management for your organization and to lead by example Phases involved in implementing change You can make it easier for your employees to adapt to the new technologies or processes by approaching the changes in phases preparation acceptance implementation and commitment Preparation Build the foundation that leads to commitment It is up to you as business owner to help your employees understand the need for change If you can explain what is involved they may begin to accept what is expected of them Before you start there may be some preliminary questions to consider Is your own level of commitment to the change enough Have you considered all available opportunities choices and risks Have you addressed any organizational or cultural barriers Have you provided for adequate training and support When you are ready here are some steps that could help build the foundation Identify the need for change Be clear about why you want it and make a compelling business case for moving forward Communicate with everyone involved early on to build trust and cohesion throughout the business Encourage dialogue among those affected by the change including part time and contract employees and those working offsite Your goal is to get information and set the tone for future communication Determine how ready your business is to proceed with the change process by anticipating any sources of resistance within your business and the possible causes Don t try to suppress resistance if

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/page/2628/ (2016-02-14)
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  • Liquor Service Training Program - Canada Business Network
    Financing Find financing Government grants and financing Grants contributions and financial assistance Loans and cash advances Loan guarantees Tax refunds and credits Wage subsidies Equity investments Private sector financing Sources of private sector financing Accessing equity financing Personal assets Financing from non government organizations Business Planning Social enterprises and non profits Financing More Managing Day to day operations Managing your finances Operations planning Protecting your business Benchmarking Supply chain management Management leadership Organizational design Environment and business Exiting your business Employees Hiring employees Keeping employee records Teleworkers Managing employees during tough times Implementing tools for human resources administration Training E business security privacy and legal requirements Marketing and sales Marketing basics Promoting and advertising your business Sales and customer relationship management Selling to governments Marketing advertising and sales regulations Developing your website Using technology in your daily operations Social enterprises and non profits Managing More Growing Planning for business growth Things to consider before expanding your business Identify opportunities arising from your current business Ways to grow your business Business activities to achieve growth Business planning Organizations and resources for growth R D and innovation Improving your productivity with technology Research and development Commercialization Licensing and technology transfer opportunities Financing for innovation Innovative business activities Innovation resources Exporting and importing Exporting Importing Investing abroad Business support organizations Social enterprises and non profits Growing More Government Taxes GST HST Federal tax information Provincial and territorial tax information Tax refunds and credits Registering your business Regulations Regulated business activities Regulated industries Regulatory change Standards Permits and licences Copyright and intellectual property What is intellectual property Copyright Trade marks Patents Industrial designs Integrated circuit topographies Protecting your intellectual property in export markets Product licensing Selling to governments Why sell to the government Preparing to sell to the government Selling to the federal government

    Original URL path: http://www.entreprisescanada.ca/eng/program/2037/ (2016-02-14)
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