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  • Fire Extinguishers | Fire Prevention Canada
    D Ensure you use the right extinguisher for the appropriate type of fire Ordinary Combustibles Fires started with paper wood drapes and upholstery require a Class A type extinguisher Flammable and Combustible Liquids Fires originating from fuel oil gasoline paint grease in a frying pan solvents and other flammable liquids require a Class B type extinguisher Electrical Equipment Fires started with wiring overheated fuse boxes conductors and other electrical sources require a Class C type extinguisher Metals Certain metals such as magnesium and sodium require a special dry powder Class D type extinguisher A multi purpose dry chemical labelled ABC puts out most types of fires wood paper cloth flammable liquids and electrical fires If you intend to buy more than one you may want to purchase a BC for the kitchen an A for the living room and an ABC for the basement and garage BUYING AND MAINTAINING AN EXTINGUISHER Extinguishers come in a dry chemical foam carbon dioxide water or Halon form Whatever type you buy it should be labelled by a nationally recognized testing laboratory The higher the number rating on the extinguisher the more fire it puts out High rated extinguishers are often not always the heavier models Ensure you can hold and operate the one you buy comfortably Ask your dealer how to have your extinguisher serviced and inspected Recharge it after ANY use A partially used extinguisher might as well be empty Extinguishers should be installed near an escape route and away from potential fire hazards LEARN HOW TO P A S S Pull the pin Some units require the releasing of a lock latch pressing a puncture lever inversion or other motion Aim the extinguisher nozzle horn at the base of the fire Squeeze or press the handle Sweep from side to side

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/fire-extinguishers/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Home Safety | Fire Prevention Canada
    of a fire LIVING ROOM Fireplace always use a fire screen ensuring it is the appropriate size for the fireplace opening Power bars should not be used to overload electrical outlets Do not use extension cords in the place of additional outlets Smokers should check furniture for fallen cigarettes or embers which can smoulder undetected for hour before bursting into flames Ensure careful use of smoking materials and extinguish in water before disposal Never leave cigarettes in an ashtray unattended Use ashtrays with a double rim and deep centre Keep matches lighters and lit candles out of the reach of children Never leave lit candles unattended BEDROOM Install at least one smoke alarm outside each sleeping area For improved safety install a smoke alarm in every bedroom Check electrical appliances regularly in accordance with manufacturer s instructions electric blankets heating pads curling irons radios televisions irons Bedrooms should be non smoking areas BASEMENT AND ATTIC Remove all combustible and flammable materials from the basement and attic Do not store gasoline in basements or attics Store gasoline in well ventilated areas preferably outdoors Do not store propane indoors Use only approved containers to store and transport gasoline Have a thorough yearly maintenance check of the furnace carried out by a professional When replacing an old furnace consult a professional to determine the most safe economical and efficient system for your home Chimneys should be cleaned at least once a year GARAGE AND WORKSHOP Flammable materials thinners gasoline paints industrial cleaners should be stored neatly in approved containers and away from possible ignitable sources Do not smoke or leave matches or lighters in the garage or workshop Install and know how to properly use the appropriate fire extinguisher for the garage workshop Keep the area clean Remove garbage paper products oily rags

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/home-safety/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Office Safety | Fire Prevention Canada
    disposal of smoking materials like an outdoor cigarette receptacle Provide adequate clearance and circulation of air between combustible material and hot surfaces or heat sources such as copy machines word processors and computers Unplug electrical appliances coffee makers space heaters and hot plates when not in use Restrict and monitor the use of heaters and hot plates To ensure they meet code requirements all electrical distribution systems should be checked by a professional certified electrician Perform regularly scheduled and recorded maintenance of electrical equipment Prevent access to the office by unauthorized personnel Keep flammables properly stored and secured Provide adequate security exterior interior lighting intrusion alarms guard service well secured access openings Provide automatic sprinkler protection and or heat smoke and fire alarm systems Adequate sprinkler coverage is the key to providing the most effective fire protection in buildings Strategically locate the portable fire extinguishers suitable for particular fire hazards and train key employees on their proper operation Establish an Emergency Team and train each member on how to respond to fire emergencies Develop a fire emergency evacuation plan and conduct at least two fire drills per year in order to familiarize office personnel on how to respond to fire

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/safety-tips-for-the-office/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Quick Facts on CO | Fire Prevention Canada
    EFFECTS If inhaled carbon monoxide deprives the blood of oxygen Prolonged exposure can lead to unconsciousness brain damage or death CAUSES Blocked or dirty vents flues chimneys and furnaces as well as improper ventilation of burning fireplaces or woodstoves DEATHS Approximately 200 per year PREVENTION Annual inspection and cleaning of Furnaces Chimneys Fireplaces Other fuel burning equipment such as gas dryers SAFETY TIPS ON HOW TO AVOID CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING INSTALL at least one carbon monoxide detector in your home ENSURE a wood or coal burning stove is properly installed and vented DON T operate a gasoline powered engine kerosene stove or charcoal grill in a closed space BARBECUE grills should never be operated indoors CHECK clothes dryer vents that open outside the house for lint CHECK forced air fans for proper ventilation If you suspect carbon monoxide in your home get out immediately and call the fire department Site Links Home About Us Board Staff Fire Prevention Fact Sheets FPC Archives Kids Zone FAQ Sponsors Partners Media E Mail Us Sponsors Partners Click on a sponsor s title to visit their website Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Mary Lambert Productions Levitt Safety Melaleuca Rona Home Garden Kidde Canada

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/quick-facts-on-co/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Fire Safety for Seniors | Fire Prevention Canada
    electrical cords under a carpet or rug SMOKE ALARMS CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE Smoke alarms are inexpensive and easy to install For informatiion on the location and installation of smoke alarms visit our Smoke Alarm s fact sheet Ensure there is a working smoke alarm on every floor of the home and outside every sleeping area Have a friend or relative test your smoke alarm while you are asleep to ensure you can hear it Once a month test the battery by pressing the test button Once a year change the battery To clean the smoke alarm open the cover and gently vacuum the unit with a soft brush attachment Replace smoke alarms if they are more than 10 years old FIRE ESCAPE PLANNING SAVES LIVES Develop and practice a fire escape plan Be sure to include all hallways and stairs Know 1 two ways out of every room 2 how to escape from all levels of your home Ensure all doors and windows can be unlocked or opened IN CASE OF FIRE GET OUT AND STAY OUT NEVER GO BACK INTO A BURNING BUILDING Crawl low near the floor to the nearest exit maintaining contact with the wall Test the door by feeling it with the back of your hand If it is hot do not open Use an alternative route If the door and knob are cool stay low with your shoulder against the door while opening slowly turning your face away from the door as you open it Be ready to close the door if smoke and heat rush in If trapped put as many closed doors as possible between you and the fire and seal all cracks in doors and windows with towels or bedding wet towels or bedding if possible If your clothing catches fire

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/fire-safety-for-seniors/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Smoke Alarms | Fire Prevention Canada
    feet from any corner Do not recess smoke alarms in walls or ceilings Smoke alarms in rooms with ceiling slopes greater than 30 cm one foot rise per 2 4 m eight feet horizontally should be located on the high side of the room Avoid locating an alarm at the peak of an A frame type ceiling Never paint a smoke alarm Keep alarms 60 to 90 cm two to three feet away from light fixtures WHEN HAVING AN ALARM CONNECTED INTO THE ELECTRICAL WIRING SYSTEM OF A HOUSE YOU SHOULD Use a qualified electrical contractor Never install the alarm in the electrical circuit except at the main panel Alarms must also never be installed in a circuit connected to an on off switch Check the alarm when installation is complete MARK YOUR CALENDAR TESTING AND CLEANING Test your smoke alarm monthly and clean it every 6 months Mark it on your calendar so that you don t forget Things to remember when testing your smoke alarm Ensure that power is being transmitted to the alarm and that it will activate in the presence of smoke Test your smoke alarm by pressing the test button Even alarms with a pilot light that indicate power is being transmitted should be tested regularly Battery operated smoke alarms will warn you when batteries need replacing Despite this make it a habit to change the batteries yearly When you ve been away from home for a few days check your alarm on your return to ensure it is working properly Remember your smoke alarm can t protect you if the batteries have been removed or a plug has been disconnected The lifespan of a typical smoke alarm is about 10 years but some models last as little as 5 years To clean the alarm

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/smoke-alarms/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Smoke Kills | Fire Prevention Canada
    during a fire A smouldering fire may go undetected for hours especially while people are asleep In addition to deadly carbon monoxide smoke carries poisons such as hydrogen cyanide and irritants such as formaldehyde and acetic acid Added to this lethal potion are other toxic substances that come from the burning of synthetic materials commonly found in the home especially those emitted from plastics and foams Oxides of nitrogen sulphur dioxide and ammonia are just a few examples These agents can have a lethal effect before a sleeper is even disturbed especially when one considers that the fire itself consumes life sustaining oxygen Normally air is made up of about 21 percent oxygen When it falls below the 17 percent level thinking and coordination become difficult Below 16 percent a person s behaviour turns irrational hindering escape efforts Breathing becomes impossible when oxygen levels fall below 6 percent Super heated air and gases rise quickly and produce what is known as a hot fire Temperatures above 370 C 700 F are common in a hot fire At such high temperatures unconsciousness and death can occur within minutes Bedrooms located in the upper floors of residences are frequently subjected to these

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/smoke-kills/ (2015-03-14)
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  • Modern homes burn faster | Fire Prevention Canada
    report concluded smoke alarms generally provided the necessary escape time for different fire types and locations This research led to the popular use of smoke alarms in residential settings A more recent 2005 study found a troubling difference with the previous investigation The amount of safe escape time was consistently shorter and the fire growth rates were faster It is thought that synthetic materials currently found in homes contributed to this change The study concluded that because fires could be more aggressive the time needed to escape home fires has been reduced from approximately 17 minutes to as little as three minutes This gives less time for occupants to escape a fire and is shorter than the seven minute response time target for fire services This disparity can mean the difference between life and death In May 2008 Alberta Municipal Affairs launched a public education and awareness campaign to make citizens aware of the three minute window of safety in a house fire and the seven minute fire services response time In rural areas served by volunteer fire departments the response times can be expected to be longer than the seven minutes expected of career fire departments The public is encouraged to plan for a three minute evacuation in case of a fire The campaign serves as a reminder of our personal responsibility for fire safety the prevention of fires in the first place the detection of smoke and fire with working smoke alarms as a second line of defense and evacuation to safety by having a well rehearsed fire escape plan as the third and most important action We urge you to visit this unique interactive website at www 3minutedrill alberta ca This site contains easily understood fire prevention and safety tips using a model house in cross section

    Original URL path: http://www.fiprecan.ca/modern-homes-burn-faster/ (2015-03-14)
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