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  • KOTM Facilitates Chiefs Forum on H1N1 Through Videoconferencing | FirstMile
    s dynamic management of the limited pool of available bandwidth The call was supported by the use of K Net s videoconferencing bridge The bridge can connect to both ISDN and IP based videoconferencing units and to the telephone network Connections in the communities took place through KOTM Ontario Telemedicine Network OTN partner Telemedicine Suites The OTN is one of the largest telemedicine networks in the world It uses live two way videoconferencing to provide telemedicine services to more than 3000 health care professionals in more than 1175 sites across the province Ontario Telemedicine Network Thanks to the regional networking made possible through this videoconferencing system the Chiefs invited community leaders from Manitoba to participate as well The Manitoba Chiefs were glad to join and exchange different methods of pandemic planning Each of the H1N1 videoconference calls had as many as 45 communities participating from across Ontario and Manitoba During the online videoconference event three Chiefs considered champions in managing H1N1 in their own communities facilitated the discussion These three Chiefs were Don Morris Big Trout Lake First Nation Connie Gray McKay Mishkeegogamang First Nation and Adam Fiddler Sandy Lake First Nation The Chiefs took complete ownership of the forum They were the ones to decide who their next guests would be and what would be discussed They were able to exchange ideas in their own language At times when things sounded very dismal someone would tell a funny story and get everyone laughing This is very typical in native culture laughter is good medicine for the soul This made the meeting of leaders from the two provinces very effective said Tina Kakepetum Schultz of KOTM Over a series of five sessions the Chiefs shared what they had done in their own communities to combat the disease and discussed possibilities with other community leaders The Chiefs shared numerous strategies throughout the series of five videoconferences Setup for Videoconferences The conference calls were funded by Health Canada and also included Health Canada managers from Toronto Ottawa Thunder Bay and Sioux Lookout I was telling the Regional Director of Health Canada about one of the Chiefs requesting to use videoconference to meet other Chiefs to discuss the H1N1 We were also interested in finding out what prevention plans they had in place The Regional Director asked me to let her know when dates of the meetings were set and she would get her staff involved said Tina The Health Canada managers were available to answer any of the Chiefs questions This gave the community leaders access to experienced health care professionals that might not have otherwise been available The success of the Chief s Forum on H1N1 demonstrated how the videoconference network can be used to discuss pressing health issues This encouraged KOTM to continue to work on providing a program for the Chiefs to access to regular videoconferencing sessions This new initiative will be called The Chiefs Meeting Place The Chiefs Meeting Place will be only for the Chiefs and their

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/kotm-facilitates-chiefs-forum-on-h1n1-through-videoconferencing/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Knowledge and Career Development Network | FirstMile
    of science and outdoor education workshops and development of science and outdoor education resources KCDN provides learning experiences and resources that are digitally based Both initiatives have already been piloted To date KCDN facilitators have certified 18 teachers to use Canadian Wildlife Federation educational resources As well we have developed and distributed the video Flight of the Pelican for use in schools Feedback and the success of these pilots has led to the development of the Future Trails program EMBED VIDEO Watch Flight of the Pelican and visit the project website to learn more Why Science and the Environment At KCDC we believe the best way to interest students is to have lessons that are relevant to their life experience Unfortunately most of the learning resources available to teachers are not engaging or relevant At the same time Saskatchewan youth live in communities that are surrounded by thousands of square kilometres of sparsely inhabited farmland and forest Where could we find a more relevant science lab Activities in environmental and outdoor studies can be used as a stepping stone to generate interest in science and mathematics Those classes in turn create the foundation for studies in the skilled trades or professions demanded by Saskatchewan s labour market Get Involved In today s world a highly successful education system is key to future economic prosperity Successful companies need access to trained and skilled workers KCDN enables corporations to contribute to the development of relevant educational programming Your donation will be used to build your company s future work force In addition your corporation will have visibility in KCDN s projects Make the commitment to contribute to the future of Saskatchewan today Randy Johns KCDC CEO randy johns kcdc ca 306 425 4778 ext 1176 306 425 0371 cell Brenda La Roque

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/kcdn/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Northern Indigenous Community Satellite Network | FirstMile
    really working well and has allowed us to expand local capacity The NICSN network was built through two rounds of funding released by the National Satellite Initiative NSI In Ontario Industry Canada s FedNor program invested in the development of the satellite hub site as well as in the First Nation earth stations over the past ten years In the first round starting in 2002 NSI allocated one Public Benefit Transponder to NICSN to provide service to public institutions in the 43 communities to be served Building on an already existing network operated by KO KNet the additional transponder space allowed Manitoba KTC BCN and Quebec KRG to join the network The group secured 36 MHz of satellite capacity 31 Mbps of usable bandwidth through leveraging the Transponder s research use public benefit requirement which was a component of the government s license to Telesat NICSN successfully argued the resulting connectivity would fulfill the public benefit requirement because it enabled the delivery of core public and community services The group successfully secured bandwidth for 15 years 2005 2020 with 100 per cent of costs covered by the Federal government Industry Canada and Telesat In 2005 NICSN launched the first inter provincial community owned and operated broadband satellite network in Canada National C Band Benefit User Group Press Release 2005 In 2007 NSI s second round of funding enabled the group to expand residential access through the Government of Canada s Strategic Infrastructure Fund NICSN used this funding 27 million from the NSI and other funders to procure two more satellite transponders and the required earth station and local access network upgrades for the next 11 years The NICSN network is managed from the hub earth station in Sioux Lookout Ontario which serves as the Internet gateway and network management centre To enable local autonomy each regional partner follows its own network model albeit with technology standardized across the network These different support models demonstrate successes in achieving economies of scale network efficiencies and strong long term partnerships across geographic and jurisdictional boundaries making NICSN a sustainable network operation That is NICSN will be sustainable as long as the government continues to recognize the satellite transponders as essential backbone infrastructure that must be funded The network requires government subsidies to cover the costs to access satellite bandwidth if this is secured the network can cover annual operating costs for connectivity NICSN argued these satellite transponders must be viewed as one time capital costs Since satellite infrastructure including the transponders offers the same applications as terrestrial fibre infrastructure it should be framed the same way as a long term infrastructure build not an ongoing administration cost funded on a year by year basis Each region faces different contexts For example territorial governments have less resources to spend on connectivity than provinces like Quebec But we collectively argued that the federal funders should consider satellite capacity as a capital cost for infrastructure not an operational cost We framed it as space fibre that

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/northern-indigenous-community-satellite-network/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Keewatin Academy of Information Technology | FirstMile
    KAIT offers the Cisco Certified Network Associate CCNA Discovery curriculum as well as the CISCO Information Technology Essentials ITE curriculum In addition to delivering CISCO certified online training KAIT also offers custom informal software skills training in applications such as Microsoft Office KAIT s training is done primarily through distance education using videoconferencing units and e learning platforms such as Adobe Connect and Elluminate but face to face training options are also available While KAIT is able to offer CISCO certification it currently does not offer the industry certification testing required after that training Becoming a Pearson Vue certified testing centre is something that KAIT is considering in the long term Presently First Nations learners in remote and rural communities in Saskatchewan are able to utilize the video conferencing units in community centres health centres schools or band offices to begin their training in the Information Technology field thereby gaining valuable skills to support their community s IT needs First Nations without video conferencing units are able to access the training through the aforementioned e learning platforms Click here to find La Ronge on Google Maps This entry was posted in Community Stories Manitoba Saskatchewan Bookmark the permalink Post navigation The Gwich in Social and Cultural Institute Dear Elders Search for Latest News Guide Federal Funding for Indigenous Broadband Report Digital Technology Adoption in Northern and Remote Indigenous Communities in Canada MWC gets SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis grant for literature review FMCC team presents at CRTC BSO hearings IsumaTV Builds Innovative Digital Systems to Share High Def Streaming Video in Low Speed Remote Communities Recent Comments Archives Archives Select Month April 2016 March 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 May 2015 April 2015 March 2015 October 2014 September 2014 August 2014 July

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/kait/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Manitoba First Nations ICT Diploma | FirstMile
    are three program goals To graduate 60 students by 2012 These students will be trained in both the business and technical aspects of the ICT industry To make sure these students have employment in First Nations communities when they graduate To build ICT capacities in Aboriginal communities With corporate models for connectivity proving inadequate to the needs of remote and rural First Nations communities having members from the communities trained in the ICT field is an important means of ensuring control of connectivity remains with local First Nations IT Regional Networks and the First Nations communities whose interests they work to represent Find out more Click here to find Winnipeg on Google Maps This entry was posted in Community Stories Manitoba Saskatchewan Bookmark the permalink Post navigation Maori Claim for Spectrum as a Treaty Right Community Hubs Health and First Nations Search for Latest News Guide Federal Funding for Indigenous Broadband Report Digital Technology Adoption in Northern and Remote Indigenous Communities in Canada MWC gets SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis grant for literature review FMCC team presents at CRTC BSO hearings IsumaTV Builds Innovative Digital Systems to Share High Def Streaming Video in Low Speed Remote Communities Recent Comments Archives Archives Select

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/manitoba-first-nations-ict-diploma/ (2016-04-30)
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  • B.C. Communities prepare for National Satellite Initiative Transition | FirstMile
    the B C Broadband Satellite Initiative a government funded program that provides high speed Internet connectivity in remote communities to assist with funding and Norsat This funding will be decided on in March 2013 The second option is for Norsat to continue providing connectivity services If this option is chosen communities would begin paying for their own connectivity as of April 2014 rather than paying for it through public subsidies through the NSI The third option is for communities to lease commercial satellite bandwidth and become their own Internet Service Providers ISPs In this case possession of and responsibility for local broadband services and associated infrastructure could be transferred to the community and Band This final option may be difficult at first but can also be rewarding over the long term for several reasons Communities may not have enough technical or management capacity to become an ISP at first As a result FNTC is focused on providing training to people from the communities if they are interested in transiting from managed services to take on that role themselves Over the next year the organization is also working with the communities to plan the transfer and make informed decisions for future development One goal of this work is to support community members in resolving technical and management issues locally rather than relying on an external service provider This approach also enables communities to develop and manage their own broadband enabled public services and generate some local employment opportunities NSI already supports many positive outcomes made possible through the introduction of connectivity and Internet access in these communities Some youth are working towards finishing their high school education online rather than having to travel far outside of their communities to attend school Internet connections enable communities to communicate with each other including during emergencies For example several villages on Vancouver Island used their satellite connections to share information about a tsunami warning following an earthquake Without the ability to communicate some communities may not have learned about this warning One community used connectivity services to establish a local healthy eating initiative They ordered fresh fruits and vegetables to be delivered periodically to their community This project is not possible without access to the Internet The communities involved in this work also highlighted some challenges about the NSI project They raised concerns about the reliability of Internet connectivity and whether or not the service is beneficial for local people In many communities people lack awareness of the benefits of connectivity Some communities question how they can use connectivity for applications beyond email and Facebook One community faced a case of extreme bullying that occurred via Facebook which tarnished peoples opinion of social media and more generally the Internet This questions and concerns are valid and important for communities to consider in the months ahead With one year to go before the transition FNTC hopes to work with the communities to raise greater awareness of the benefits that connectivity and locally owned and operated

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/b-c-communities-prepare-for-national-satellite-initiative-transition/ (2016-04-30)
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  • A Different Spin on Development | FirstMile
    home A Different Spin gives people the opportunity to learn how to tell their own stories in a professional setting Kerr believes that participants feel empowered by the production process They become proficient in using professional equipment and they gain confidence in the filmmaking process For example one youth that Kerr trained in 2005 now works in Toronto as a professional filmmaker A Different Spin continues to face a number of challenges particularly in terms of program sustainability Kerr explains that the major difficulty in keeping the project alive is the fact that it does not make money The most successful projects occur when the community finds a way to gain financial stability from their filmmaking For example a group of community members in Masset B C continued to make films after A Different Spin left because they had the financial means to sustain their own equipment However Kerr contends that this is not typically the case Too often funding runs out and there is no incentive for communities to continue with filmmaking projects A Different Spin s funding mostly comes from outside donors Past donors have included Industry Canada groups involved with Geographic Information System projects and the First Nations Technology Council FNTC Consequently donor funding largely dictates which communities A Different Spin works with Donors also determine the topics that the films cover FNTC puts Kerr in contact with certain communities when a specific event needs to be filmed For example in 2005 a community in Fort St James contacted A Different Spin though the FNTC to film a church ceremony that gave back land to the First Nations community in the area A further drawback is that A Different Spin does not sufficiently utilize the Internet or new media for distribution or promotion This is largely due to the fact that there is limited Internet connectivity in many of these communities The lack of access to connectivity severely limits the ability of community members to upload their content onto the web As a result distributing and promoting the videos remains a challenge Often Kerr provides communities with a DVD copy of their work but no efforts are made for distributing or promoting the films further Sustaining the project s appeal in communities is also challenging Surprisingly Kerr observes that the last few years have seen a waning interest on the part of youth to engage in A Different Spin According to Kerr many youth he meets are not as excited by the professional equipment and opportunity to learn filmmaking skills as they have been in the past He thought this lack of interest may have something to do with the project s failure to make use of digital media In conclusion despite questions regarding A Different Spin s lack of sustainability in the long term the experience in the short term is beneficial for community empowerment Kerr contends that the communities he works with are always enthusiastic to make films He believes A Different Spin can be

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/a-different-spin-on-development/ (2016-04-30)
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  • First Nations Digital Jam | FirstMile
    and residents of the community Their success in this process led to the creation of Building an ICT Network A Guide for Small and Remote First Nations Communities This guide is intended to help other First Nations communities through the process of building a local network within their community The strong involvement with ICT made Alert Bay an ideal site for the First Nations Digital Jam The workshop included three students and one faculty member from MDM and approximately 15 young people from Alert Bay The workshop aimed to provide First Nations youth with useful and transferable computer skills in an energetic and fun way VIDEO TO BE EMBEDDED The First Nations Digital Jam MDM students and faculty mentored youth in programs such as Photoshop and GameSalad Breaking into teams the youth had 48 hours to design a video game The game followed a theme of financial literacy which the FNTC selected They felt that along with IT skills the Digital Jam would provide an engaging and unique approach to teaching youth about money management John Pantherbone from Alberta s Blood Tribe Kanai was one of the MDM students that helped facilitate the workshop He had a great experience working with the youth in Alert Bay I feel that events like the First Nations Digital Jam and the InDigital Conference where I was recently a speaker can help empower First Nations youth and teach them to embrace and utilize technology he said John also produced a First Mile video about the network in his home community Find out more Watch a run through of one of the games created during the Digital Jam This entry was posted in British Columbia Community Stories Bookmark the permalink Post navigation Cowichan Tribes and the Mustimuhw Health Data Management System K atlodeeche First Nation

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/first-nations-digital-jam/ (2016-04-30)
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