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  • Quebec | FirstMile
    July 11 2013 August 25 2015 by Jessi Jones Listuguj Quebec Tuesday 30 July 2013 10 36 AM This video produced by the First Nations Education Council in Quebec shows how the community of Listuguj is using technologies in schools Principal Jeff Grass discusses how teachers are using Smart Boards tablets and laptops as learning tools to engage students Technology at Listuguj Alaqsite w Gitpu Posted in Community Stories Quebec The Eeyou Communications Network Posted on October 5 2011 April 8 2015 by calkenny The Eeyou Communications Network Réseau de Comunications Eeyou by Hyman Glustein and Alfred Loon Eeyou Communications Network Réseau de Comunications Eeyou is a regional fibre optic network serving all Eeyou Istchee communities and towns in the James Bay region Owned by the Cree Regional Authority and the Cree School Board in partnership with neighbouring non Aboriginal townships and Posted in Community Stories Quebec Permanent Studios Posted on October 4 2011 July 28 2015 by calkenny Fibre optic broadband infrastructure supports a variety of digital applications including community based media projects In Quebec the First Nations Education Council partnered with a variety of organizations toinstall broadband in 13 of their 22 member First Nations communities These networks enable members of those communities to distribute and share digital media Permanent Studios is Posted in Community Stories Quebec ICT Supporting First Nations Classrooms Posted on October 4 2011 April 8 2015 by Jessi Jones Quebec Tuesday 4 October 2011 10 25 PM By Kerri Gibson Information and Communication Technologies ICTs have great potential to compliment and support the education of our future generations Fortunately there are high quality educational programs available that help train individuals and teachers in particular on how to creatively integrate ICT into classrooms The Masters Posted in Community Stories Quebec FNEC s New Meeting Software

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  • Ownership, Control, Access, Possession (OCAP) and Technology Development | FirstMile
    and maintained by external organizations These service providers often come from urban centres with very different circumstances than First Nations The First Mile project shares stories of how local communities have taken ownership and control of new technologies These projects put the needs of communities before technical requirements In a recent paper by members of our First Mile team based on research in Fort Severn First Nation we suggested how First Nations might apply OCAP to broadband networks We suggest that OCAP applied to telecommunications or self determination applied to broadband networks has at least two implications First that First Nations must retain access and possession of the capacity and resources to effectively manage the content traffic and services on their local network Second that First Nations have a right to own and control the local broadband network in their communities in order to support the flow of information and services Read more about OCAP at the First Nations Governance Centre Reference O Donnell S Kakekaspan M Beaton B Walmark B Gibson K 2011 How the Washaho Cree Nation at Fort Severn is Using a First Mile Approach to Deliver Community Services Paper presented at the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference TPRC George Mason University School of Law Arlington VA September Available on the Conference Papers and Proceedings 33 2011 Search for Latest News Guide Federal Funding for Indigenous Broadband Report Digital Technology Adoption in Northern and Remote Indigenous Communities in Canada MWC gets SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis grant for literature review FMCC team presents at CRTC BSO hearings IsumaTV Builds Innovative Digital Systems to Share High Def Streaming Video in Low Speed Remote Communities Recent Comments Archives Archives Select Month April 2016 March 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015 July 2015 May 2015 April

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  • Conference Papers & Proceedings | FirstMile
    Nations in Canada are part of a complex web of relationships and networks that share information resources and learning related to broadband and Information Communication Technologies ICT First Nation community leaders through their national organization the Assembly of First Nations AFN have adopted the eCommunity as an overarching approach for broadband development This development is fueled by the desire by First Nations to own control and manage their local infrastructure Regional organizations including the regional management organizations RMOs for the First Nations SchoolNet program are key players collaborating with communities to support their use of broadband and ICT In particular the videoconferencing network built by the RMOs in collaboration with the communities was and continues to be a catalyst for increased broadband development FNEC the RMO for Quebec is discussed in detail including its technology development and related activities FNEC works with partner organizations across Canada notably the Keewaytinook Okimakanak KO tribal council in northwestern Ontario and Mi kmaw Kina matnewey MK in the Atlantic region Together the three organizations are also partners with the University of New Brunswick and Simon Fraser University on several research and outreach projects two of which First Mile and VideoCom First Nations Innovation are briefly discussed Publication 45 2012 September Community Resilience and Social Media Remote and Rural First Nations Communities Social Isolation and Cultural Preservation Read more Reference Molyneaux H O Donnell S Kakekaspan C Walmark B Budka P Gibson K 2012 Community Resilience and Social Media Remote and Rural First Nations Communities Social Isolation and Cultural Preservation Paper for the 2012 International Rural Network Forum Whyalla and Upper Spencer Gulf Australia 24 28 September Abstract Community resilience in First Nations includes ties to people both inside and outside the community intergenerational communication sharing of stories and family and community connectedness This study based on a survey of internet users in the Sioux Lookout region of Northwestern Ontario explores the link between social networking sites SNS and community resilience The region is home to some of the most isolated and rural First Nations indigenous communities in Canada Cultural and familial links between these communities are strong yet until the fairly recent widespread use of the internet maintaining regular communications to strengthen cultural ties was challenging This study examines the links between travel and communication online how social media is used to preserve culture and maintain communication and the implications of social networking for community resilience Publication 44 2012 September Broadband Enabled Community Services in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation Developing an e Community Approach Read more Reference Whiteduck G Tenasco A O Donnell S Whiteduck T Lockhart E 2012 Broadband Enabled Community Services in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation Developing an e Community Approach Paper for the 2012 International Rural Network Forum Whyalla and Upper Spencer Gulf Australia 24 28 September Abstract Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation the largest Algonquin community in Canada is recognized as a leader for their community services For our collaborative study we conducted a qualitative analysis of interviews with community services staff in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg The interviews explored questions of technology and community including their current successes challenges and future potential Kitigan Zibi is developing a strategy to integrate communication infrastructure and information and communication technologies ICT into services that promote community economic social cultural and intellectual development The discussion focuses on how the community can integrate a holistic e Community approach into its strategy Publication 43 2012 June Co creating community narratives How researchers are engaging First Nation community members to co write publications Read more Reference Gibson K Thomas L O Donnell S Lockhart E Beaton B 2012 Co creating community narratives how researchers are engaging First Nation community members to co write publications Paper presented at the Qualitatives Analysis Conference St John s NL Abstract Researchers working with First Nations have heard We have been researched to death Given this reputation for research how can researchers working with First Nations turn this situation around How can we collaboratively conduct respectful research and engage First Nations meaningfully How can we ensure that the narratives we weave in research publications from interview transcripts strongly reflect the voices of community members and that our publications meet the needs of communities One way is for members of First Nation communities collaborating in the research to co write research publications The paper discusses some practical ways that researchers can do this based on our experiences with conducting research about technology with rural and remote First Nation community collaborators We discuss what has been successful and where we need to work harder to be more inclusive of the experiences and situations of community members Publication 42 2012 May ICT Use Between School and Home in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation Challenges and Opportunities for Moving Forward Collectively Read more Reference Lockhart E Tenasco A Whiteduck T O Donnell S 2012 ICT Use Between School and Home in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation Challenges and Opportunities for Moving Forward Collectively Canadian Communication Association Conference University of Waterloo Ontario May 30 Abstract Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation is an innovative rural community in Quebec Located 130 kilometers north of Ottawa it is the closest First Nation to the Canadian capital In both population and territory Kitigan Zibi is the largest of the ten Algonquin communities Broadband connectivity and information and communication technologies ICT are important to the community and incorporated into everyday operations This paper explores the use of technology in the education sector in Kitigan Zibi in particular the situation of having technology readily available at school and less so at home This transition from a technology filled classroom to limited or no ICT access at home is a challenge not only for individual students and their families but also for the community as a whole Publication 41 2012 May How First Nation Residents in Remote and Rural Communities in Ontario s Far North are using ICT and Online Services Supported by Keewaytinook Okimakanak Read more Reference Walmark B Gibson K Kakekaspan C O Donnell S Beaton B 2012 How First Nation Residents in Remote and Rural Communities in Ontario s Far North are using ICT and Online Services Supported by Keewaytinook Okimakanak Paper presented at the Canadian Communication Association CCA Annual Conference University of Waterloo Ontario May 30 Abstract For the isolated and rural communities in the Sioux Lookout region of Northwestern Ontario communication links are vital They connect community members with each other with members of other communities and with people living elsewhere in Canada and around the world Broadband networks support many of the community and social services in this region Keewaytinook Okimakanak KO Northern Chiefs in Oji Cree is a tribal council supporting and providing broadband enabled services to many of the region s remote and rural First Nations In late 2011 an online survey was conducted of community members in the region Participants responded to questions about how they are using ICT in their daily lives how they are using KO s broadband enabled services specifically KO Telemedicine KOTM and the Keewaytinook Internet High School KiHS and what supports they need to use these technologies and services more effectively This paper discusses some of the survey findings Publication 40 2012 May Post Secondary Distance Education Experiences of Elsipogtog First Nation Community Members Read more Reference Simon J Burton K Lockhart E O Donnell S 2012 Post Secondary Distance Education Experiences of Elsipogtog First Nation Community Members Presented at the Atlantic Native Teachers Education Conference ANTEC Cape Breton Nova Scotia May 17 Abstract Post secondary distance education is an option for community members living in many Atlantic First Nations This paper includes preliminary results from research based on interviews with community members of Elsipogtog First Nation in New Brunswick Most community members interviewed had taken post secondary courses by distance education while living and working in their community The focus is their experiences of distance education in particular with videoconferencing and online web based course delivery systems Publication 33 2011 September How the Washaho Cree Nation at Fort Severn is using a First Mile Approach to Deliver Community Services Read more Reference O Donnell S Kakekaspan M Beaton B Walmark B Gibson K 2011 How the Washaho Cree Nation at Fort Severn is Using a First Mile Approach to Deliver Community Services Paper presented at the Telecommunications Policy Research Conference Arlington Virginia USA September Abstract Fort Severn Washaho Cree Nation is a small remote northern community on the Severn River near Hudson Bay in Ontario The community services delivered in Fort Severn are managed and controlled by the local leadership working in collaboration with their regional tribal council Keewaytinook Okimakanak and other strategic partners The First Mile is both an emerging policy approach and a framework that supports holistic and community centred broadband development and use by First Nations First Mile focuses on community management and control of local broadband infrastructure and services The paper discusses how Fort Severn First Nation is putting First Mile concepts into action Publication 30 2011 June Mishkeegogamang First Nation Community Members Engage with Information and Communication Technologies Read more Reference Gibson K Gray McKay C O Donnell S and the People of Mishkeegogamang 2011 Mishkeegogamang First Nation Community Members Engage with Information and Communication Technologies Canadian Communication Association Conference Fredericton June 1 3 Abstract Mishkeegogamang First Nation is a rural Ojibway community in Northwestern Ontario Mishkeegogamang community members of all ages use a wide array of information and communication technologies ICT as tools in daily life and as a means to support individual and community goals This collaborative paper tells the story of how Mishkeegogamang uses ICT for community development drawing on 17 interviews with community members and several community member profiles Community informatics theory will help guide the interpretation of the findings A broad range of ICT use by community members will be explored including the Mishkeegogamang website the busy yet invisible use of social networking sites youth and ICT ICT for health and education and ICT to support traditional activities Finally a section on challenges and needs for facilitating ICT use is also provided Publication 29 2011 June Keewaytinook Mobile in Fort Severn First Nation Read more Reference O Donnell S Kakekaspan G Walmark B Mason R Mak M 2011 Keewaytinook Mobile in Fort Severn First Nation Canadian Communication Association Conference Fredericton June 1 3 Abstract Fort Severn First Nation is a remote fly in Cree community on Hudson Bay About 400 people live in the community and their lifestyle reflects a deep respect for and connection to the land In November 2009 Fort Severn and its tribal council Keewaytinook Okimakanak established Keewaytinook Mobile KM service in the community KM an innovative community owned and managed GSM cellular and data service is an example of self determination applied to telecommunications It is also the result of a number of strategic partnerships that came together to address local needs and priorities This paper includes a review of the history of Keewaytinook Mobile and its implementation in Fort Severn First Nation and a study of how and why community members are using or not using the service The analysis is based on interviews with 42 community members conducted in March 2010 and a follow up discussion with community members in November 2010 The paper discusses the challenges opportunities and ways forward for KM in Fort Severn Publication 25 2010 September Listening to the Communities Perspectives of Remote and Rural First Nations Community Members on Telemental Health Read more Reference Gibson K Coulson H Miles R Kakekayskung K Daniels B O Donnell S 2010 Listening to the Communities Perspectives of Remote and Rural First Nations Community Members on Telemental Health Rural Health Connecting Research and Policy Fredericton Canada September 23 25 Summary Telemental health involves technologies such as videoconferencing to deliver mental health services and education and to connect individuals and communities for healing and health In remote and rural First Nations there are often challenges both to obtaining mental healthcare within the community and to working with external mental health workers Telemental health is a service approach that can address some of these challenges and potentially support First Nations in their goal of improving mental health and well being This paper explores the perspectives on telemental health of community members living in two rural and remote First Nations communities in Ontario Mishkeegogamang and FortSevern Using a participatory research design we interviewed 59 community members asking about their experiences with and thoughts on using technologies and their attitudes toward telemental health specifically A thematic analysis of this qualitative data and a descriptive quantitative analysis of the information reveal the diversity of attitudes among community members Publication 24 2010 June Information and Communication Technologies and Remote and Rural First Nations Communities An Overview Read more Reference O Donnell S Milliken M Chong C Walmark B 2010 Information and Communication Technologies ICT and Remote and Rural First Nations Communities An Overview Presented at the Canadian Communication Association Annual Conference CCA 2010 Montreal June 1 3 Abstract Information and communication technologies ICT are valuable tools used to establish and maintain connections within and between remote and rural First Nations communities across Canada and between urban centres and these communities For the past decade various research projects have investigated different aspects of ICT use by and with these communities However an overview of this research has not been published This paper a literature review explains the history of ICT and First Nations communities policies and partnerships for broadband services in First Nations how remote and rural First Nations are accessing and using ICT and how to make the broadband networks and ICT sustainable Publication 18 2009 November Telemental Health with Remote and Rural First Nations Advantages Disadvantages and Ways Forward Read more Reference Gibson K Kakepetum Schultz T Coulson H O Donnell S 2009 Telemental Health with Remote and Rural First Nations Advantages Disadvantages and Ways Forward National Aboriginal Health Organisation NAHO Conference Ottawa November 24 27 Abstract Remote and rural First Nation communities have limited mental health services compared to urban communities yet their needs are similar and sometimes greater Community members living in remote isolated communities requiring mental health services are usually faced with two choices having no service or leaving their community to access services in larger centres Certain First Nation communities offer a third choice using telemental health delivered via videoconferencing to provide clinical mental health services for community members Like all technology uses telemental health services have advantages and disadvantages both for the individual and the community Understanding mental health workers experiences of telemental health and its benefits and drawbacks for remote and rural First Nations people was the focus of our study Qualitative data were collected through interviews with mental health professionals clinicians and nonclinicians working with First Nations communities Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a national online survey of mental health workers working with clients in rural and remote First Nations This paper presents a thematic analysis of the data collected Advantages include allowing community members to remain within their community for treatment and connecting First Nations trauma survivors to each other disadvantages include increased difficulty building and maintaining clinical relationships via videoconference and ethical concerns of using the technology These and other pros and cons of using telemental health are discussed Certain ways forward that seem promising are proposed including incorporating traditional practices and the seven teachings into telemental health initiatives Finally policy recommendations are offered Publication 17 2009 October ICT and Health and Wellness in Remote and Rural First Nations Communities A Social Determinants of Health Perspective Read more Reference Molyneaux H O Donnell S 2009 ICT and Health and Wellness in Remote and Rural First Nations Communities A Social Determinants of Health Perspective Canadian Society of Telehealth Conference CST 2009 Vancouver BC October 3 6 Abstract The topic of information and communication technologies ICT for health is generally framed as telehealth and other technology processes that enable delivery of mainstream health services However First Nation communities are also using ICT for community development activities that contribute to improved health and wellness Based on the preliminary results of a literature review on how ICT is being used in remote and rural First Nations this paper uses a social determinants of health perspective to begin to create a broader understanding of how ICT can contribute to community health and wellness in remote and rural First Nations Publication 16 2009 October Clinicians Attitudes toward the Use of Information and Communication Technologies for Mental Health Services in Remote and Rural Areas Read more Reference Gibson K Simms D O Donnell S Molyneaux H 2009 Clinicians Attitudes toward the Use of Information and Communication Technologies for Mental Health Services in Remote and Rural Areas Canadian Society of Telehealth Conference CST 2009 Vancouver BC October 3 6 Abstract Little research exists regarding clinicians attitudes towards the use of information and communication technologies ICT in clinical service provision particularly within populations such as First Nations and Operational Stress Injury OSI clients These clients may be particularly well served by technologies such as videoconferencing which allow clinicians to service these clients many of whom are located in remote and rural geographical locations However adoption of these services is dependent upon on clinicians willingness to use these technologies In this paper we discuss the results of qualitative and quantitative analysis of both survey and interview responses with a specific emphasis on clinicians attitudes towards use of ICT in service delivery in the present and future Further we explore successes challenges and barriers to the use of technology as well as suggestions for future directions for research Publication 13 2009 May Communication in Place Videoconferencing for First Nation Community Development Read more Reference Milliken M O Donnell S 2009 Communication in Place Videoconferencing for First Nation Community Development Presented at the Canadian Communication Association Annual Conference CCA 2009 Carleton University Ottawa May Abstract One definition of globalization suggests that the social relations traditionally associated

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/resources/publications/conference-papers-proceedings/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Book Chapters & Journal Articles | FirstMile
    First Nation Owned and Managed Fibre Networks across Quebec Journal of Community Informatics 10 2 Abstract In Canada small rural and remote communities continue to struggle to access equitable and affordable high speed internet connections that address local priorities and needs The First Nations Education Council FNEC is working with their community partners across Quebec to plan and operate a First Nation owned and managed fibre network to deliver broadband connections throughout each community Public and private partnerships were established by FNEC to fund and construct the regional and local networks connecting these rural and remote communities The paper describes the history of this development along with its future goals Sharing infrastructure and network support services with all the other service providers health education administration justice policing homes etc in each of these communities helps to sustain the ongoing operation and maintenance of the network Publication 64 2014 April Settler Colonialism and First Nations e Communities in Northwestern Ontario Read more Reference Beaton B Campbell P 2014 Settler Colonialism and First Nations e Communities in Northwestern Ontario Journal of Community Informatics 10 2 Abstract Across Canada First Nation community leaders are adopting the e Community approach for their local broadband development E Community is fueled by the desire of First Nations to own control and manage their local infrastructure and online services The article develops the concept of the importance of locally owned and managed telecommunication infrastructure supporting First Nation e Community and local resilience The First Nations e Community framework provides choices for local people to remain in their communities and contribute to the growth and positive development in these challenging environments The First Nations struggle against settler colonialism to access their lands and resources by the colonial governments and their corporate partners continues today Strong resilient First Nations are now in a position to influence and support outcomes that benefit themselves the lands and others in a positive manner Publication 63 2014 April From the First Mile to Outer Space Tamaani Satellite Internet in Northern Quebec Read more Reference McMahon R Mangiok T 2014 From the First Mile to Outer Space Tamaani Satellite Internet in Northern Quebec Journal of Community Informatics 10 2 Abstract Across Canada discrepancies of access to broadband exist between urban centres and rural and remote Aboriginal communities Government public and private sector organizations are partnering to address these digital divides Some employ a First Mile approach that foregrounds how community based institutions are driving development This article provides a First Mile case study from the Inuit territory of Nunavik We describe the cultural social and political contexts the people of Nunavik and their government navigated to establish broadband in the region s 14 northern villages The Kativik Regional Government is building and administering infrastructure that delivers public services and encourages economic development balancing centralized efficiencies with the needs of residents in villages like Ivujivik Note This article led by First Nations Innovation Postdoctoral Fellow Rob McMahon is based on his PhD thesis research at Simon Fraser University and was supported by a PhD scholarship from SFU Rob s full thesis can be accessed from this link http summit sfu ca item 13532 Publication 62 2014 April Developing an e Community Approach to Community Services in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation Read more Reference Whiteduck G Tenasco A O Donnell S Whiteduck T Lockhart E 2014 Developing an e Community Approach to Community Services in Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation Journal of Community Informatics 10 2 Abstract Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation is a leader in community and social services This rural First Nation the largest Algonquin community in Canada has since 1980 successfully supported community members to take ownership of service development and delivery They have made many services and programs available to community members including an elementary and secondary school a day care a community hall a community radio a health centre a police department a youth centre and others Their community services are led and staffed by fully trained and qualified community members As computers broadband internet and cellular services have become available in Kitigan Zibi the service sectors have been integrating these technologies with a goal of improving services for and communications with community members However they face many challenges in their efforts to remain innovative and plan for future delivery of services using technologies Our study based on qualitative analysis from interviews with 14 community services staff in Kitigan Zibi will explore their current successes challenges and future potential for integrating information and communication technologies ICT into services that promote community and social development The analysis discusses the eCommunity approach advocated by the Assembly of First Nations Publication 61 2014 April First Mile Challenges to Last Mile Rhetoric Exploring the Discourse between Remote and Rural First Nations and the Telecom Industry Read more Reference Philpot D Beaton B Whiteduck T 2014 First Mile Challenges to Last Mile Rhetoric Exploring the Discourse between Remote and Rural First Nations and the Telecom Industry Journal of Community Informatics 10 2 Abstract Solving Canada s digital divide remains a significant issue particularly considering how broadband networks have an impact on remote and rural areas politically economically socially and culturally Attached to this as well are the politics of the historical relationship between remote and rural First Nation communities corporations and the government The way in which the relationship between remote and rural First Nations the federal and provincial governments and the telecommunications industries is reproduced is largely through discursive means One of the consequences of this is that many outsiders to this issue are largely misinformed through documents and press releases These documents frame remote and rural First Nations as helpless and dependent upon government and telecom industry intervention in order to secure their dependence upon their services We argue that this is another form of political colonialism a form of colonialism which seeks to create dependence upon the service economy for its own survival In this article we examine the discourse surrounding the issue of remote and rural broadband connectivity as a means of exploring the reproduction of established narratives of First Nations dependence upon aid and service Publication 60 2014 April Information and Communication Technology for Education in an Algonquin First Nation in Quebec Read more Reference Lockhart E Tenasco A Whiteduck T O Donnell S 2014 Information and Communication Technology for Education in an Algonquin First Nation in Quebec Journal of Community Informatics 10 2 Abstract Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation is an innovative rural community in Quebec Located 130 kilometers north of Ottawa it is the closest First Nation to the Canadian capital In both population and territory Kitigan Zibi is the largest of the ten Algonquin communities Broadband connectivity and information and communication technologies ICT are important to the community and incorporated into everyday operations This paper explores the use of technology in the education sector in Kitigan Zibi in particular the situation of having technology readily available at school and less so at home This transition from a technology filled classroom to limited or no ICT access at home is a challenge not only for individual students and their families but also for the community as a whole Publication 59 2014 February Post Secondary Distance Education in a Contemporary Colonial Context Experiences of Students in a Rural First Nation in Canada Read more Reference Simon J Burton K Lockhart E O Donnell S 2014 Post Secondary Distance Education in a Contemporary Colonial Context Experiences of Students in a Rural First Nation in Canada The International Review of Research on Open and Distance Learning 1 15 1 19 Abstract Post secondary distance education gives students and their families living in remote and rural regions the option to stay in their communities while they study instead of moving closer to the universities in cities Post secondary distance education is an option in many rural and remote First Nation Indigenous communities in Canada however there are many challenges to successful adoption in these communities There are also many opportunities for post secondary institutions to expand their abilities and capacity in developing and delivering appropriate content supporting these unique self governing environments in Canada We explore the experiences of students from a rural First Nation in Canada with post secondary distance education focusing on how different delivery methods offer both opportunities and challenges for community based students The study is situated in the context of contemporary colonialism in Canada Publication 58 2014 February An Inquiry into Community Members Use and Attitudes toward Technology in Mishkeegogamang Tepacimowin Networks Read more Reference Gray McKay C Gibson K O Donnell S People of Mishkeegogamang 2014 An Inquiry into Community Members Use and Attitudes toward Technology in Mishkeegogamang Tepacimowin Networks The Journal of Community Informatics 10 1 Abstract Mishkeegogamang First Nation is a rural Ojibway community in Northwestern Ontario Mishkeegogamang community members of all ages use a wide array of information and communication technologies ICT as tools in daily life and as a means to support individual and community goals This collaborative paper tells the story of how Mishkeegogamang uses ICT for community development drawing on 17 interviews with community members and several community member profiles A basic descriptive quantitative analysis is also provided giving information on frequency of use of a wide variety of technologies Community informatics theory guides the interpretation of the findings A broad range of ICT use by community members is explored including the Mishkeegogamang website the busy yet invisible use of social networking sites youth and ICT ICT for health and education and ICT to support traditional activities Finally a section on challenges and needs for facilitating ICT use is also provided Publication 57 2014 January How Women in Remote and Rural First Nation Communities are Using Information and Communications Technologies ICT Read more Reference Carpenter P Gibson K Kakekaspan C O Donnell S 2013 How Women in Remote and Rural First Nation Communities are Using Information and Communications Technologies ICT In W Ashton A S Carson Eds Special issue The Journal of Rural and Community Development 8 2 79 97 Abstract First Nations women have a strong role guiding the success of their family and their community In the past women nurtured their family ensuring their food and safety These responsibilities are still true today with the added challenges and opportunities of modern day life In Northern Ontario many remote and rural First Nation communities are connected to integral services via broadband The current study explores how First Nations women are using information and communication technology ICT and if the technology can address some of their challenges and open up new opportunities Two hundred and thirty one women living in remote and rural First Nation communities in Northern Ontario completed an online survey sharing their thoughts and experiences with regard to ICT use in daily life ICT for health and wellness ICT for cultural preservation and what is needed to support their effective use of ICT The findings suggest that the women in these remote communities are active users of ICT using the internet for frequent communication with people living in their own communities along with other communities and elsewhere in Canada The women are also familiar with telemedicine use the internet in a variety of ways to preserve their culture and identified many strategies for supporting their effective use of ICT Finally we explore a case study of how women in Slate Falls First Nation are using ICT Publication 50 2013 May Videoconferencing for First Nations Community Controlled Education Health and Development Read more Reference O Donnell S Johnson L Katepetum Schultz T Burton K Whiteduck T Mason R Beaton B McMahon R Gibson K 2013 Videoconferencing for First Nations Community Controlled Education Health and Development The Electronic Journal of Communication 23 1 2 Abstract Videoconferencing is a powerful tool that First Nations in Canada are using to create communication spaces for local control of community services and community development For First Nations in Canada videoconferencing sessions are alternative public spheres for engagement and interaction outside of mainstream control This article discusses how First Nations are using videoconferencing to create and support community controlled education and training health services and other community development activities Perspectives of a videoconferencing bridge coordinator and a case study from Keewaywin First Nation are discussed Challenges for videoconferencing in First Nations are reviewed followed by some thoughts about the future of videoconferencing in these unique communities Publication 37 2012 February A History of Communication by Fort Severn First Nation Community Members From Hand Deliveries to Virtual Pokes Read more Reference Gibson K Kakekaspan M Kakekaspan G O Donnell S Walmark B Beaton B and the People of Fort Severn First Nation 2012 A History of Communication by Fort Severn First Nation Community Members From Hand Deliveries to Virtual Pokes Proceedings of the iConference 2012 Toronto Ontario February Abstract Fort Severn Washaho Cree Nation is the most northern community in Ontario Without road access for most of the year Fort Severn community members have always found innovative and useful ways to communicate and share information This paper traces the history of everyday communications from the pre analogue era to the current day The focus is on how Fort Severn community members communicate and use technology in a community centered and holistic way Information was gathered for this paper over the course of three visits to the community and 59 interviews with Fort Severn community members Community members reflect on their history of communications and their current use of a broad range of technologies that use broadband Critical thinking about technology use and what is needed to support continued innovative and community centered use are explored Publication 36 2011 Digital Divides and the First Mile Framing First Nations Broadband Development in Canada Read more Reference McMahon R O Donnell S Smith R Walmark B Beaton B Simmonds J 2011 Digital Divides and the First Mile Framing First Nations Broadband Development in Canada The International Indigenous Policy Journal 2 2 Abstract This article was produced by the First Mile project a collaboration led by Simon Fraser University Across Canada rural and remote First Nations face a significant digital divide As self determining autonomous nations in Canada these communities are building broadband systems to deliver public services to their members and residents To address this challenge First Nations are working towards a variety of innovative locally driven broadband development initiatives This paper contributes a theoretical discussion that frames our understanding of these initiatives by drawing on the paradigm of the First Mile We argue that broadband development policy in Canada must be re framed to address the specific needs of First Nations The First Mile position foregrounds community based involvement control and ownership a consideration we suggest has particular resonance for First Nations This is because it holds potential to move beyond the historical context of paternalistic colonial derived development policies in the context of broadband systems development We argue First Nations broadband projects offer on the ground examples of a First Mile approach and call for more research in this area Publication 34 2011 December A New Remote Community Owned Wireless Communication Service Fort Severn First Nation Builds Their Local Cellular System with Keewaytinook Mobile Read more Reference O Donnell S Kakekaspan G Beaton B Walmark B Mason R Mak M 2011 A New Remote Community Owned Wireless Communication Service Fort Severn First Nation Builds Their Local Cellular System with Keewaytinook Mobile Canadian Journal of Communication 36 4 663 673 Abstract Fort Severn First Nation is a remote fly in community on Hudson Bay The lifestyle reflects a deep respect for and connection to the land The Keewaytinook Okimakinak KO Tribal Council has developed the Keewaytinook Mobile KM service in remote First Nation communities in Northern Ontario In November 2009 Fort Severn and KO established the KM service in the community This study traces the history of KM and its implementation in Fort Severn and describes how and why community members are using the service The analysis is based on interviews and discussions with community members during three research visits from March 2010 to March 2011 This publication is also available in French 34 F Publication 32 2011 August Mental health professionals perspectives of telemental health with remote and rural First Nations communities Read more Reference Gibson K Coulson H Kakepetum Schultz T O Donnell S 2011 Mental health professionals perspectives of telemental health with remote and rural First Nations communities Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare 2011 17 263 267 Abstract We conducted an online survey and interviews of mental health workers in Canada who reported experience in working with rural and remote First Nations although not necessarily telemental health Sixty three respondents of the 164 to the online survey reported experience in working with clients in remote and rural First Nations Only 16 of the online survey respondents with remote and rural First Nations experience reported having received training in videoconferencing use A quantitative data analysis was used to explore their perceptions of usefulness and ease of use of telemental health as well as the relationships among these constructs Advantages disadvantages and challenges in using the technology were identified from the qualitative data Promising ways forward include incorporating traditional practices and the Seven Teachings into telemental health services This publication is also available in French 32 F Publication 31 2011 May Conversations on telemental health listening to remote and rural First Nations communities Read more Reference Gibson KL Coulson H Miles R Kakekakekung C Daniels E O Donnell S Conversations on telemental health listening to remote and rural First Nations communities Rural and Remote Health 11 online 2011 1656 Abstract Telemental health involves technologies such as videoconferencing to deliver mental health services and education and to connect individuals and communities for healing and health In remote and rural First Nations communities there are often challenges to obtaining mental healthcare in the community and to working with external mental health workers Telemental health is a service approach

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  • Your story | FirstMile
    pdf txt gif jpg jpeg png ppt Maximum file size 20mb Attach File 2 CAPTCHA Code Need some help Here s a quick tutorial on how to create your story 1 If you haven t already done so sign up for an account on WordPress 2 Once you are logged in return to this page and enter your information above You can upload photos type in text add hyperlinks and include links to more information We encourage you to link to videos uploaded to the http media knet ca website That is because the media files are then hosted on First Nations infrastructure This is instead of third party sites like YouTube or Vimeo Click here for a PowerPoint on how to do this Search for Latest News Guide Federal Funding for Indigenous Broadband Report Digital Technology Adoption in Northern and Remote Indigenous Communities in Canada MWC gets SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis grant for literature review FMCC team presents at CRTC BSO hearings IsumaTV Builds Innovative Digital Systems to Share High Def Streaming Video in Low Speed Remote Communities Recent Comments Archives Archives Select Month April 2016 March 2016 January 2016 December 2015 November 2015 October 2015 September 2015 August 2015

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/your_story/#FSContact1 (2016-04-30)
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  • Reports | FirstMile
    in First Nations and Inuit communities Vancouver Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology CPROST Simon Fraser University December Abstract This report is from the First Mile project a collaboration led by Simon Fraser University The report paints a picture of First Nations and Inuit community based broadband networks and information and communication technologies in Canada It highlights the very different levels of broadband infrastructure and connectivity that exist across the country Even at the end of the first decade of the 21st century many of these communities remain unserved or underserved when compared to their neighbours in urban Canada But despite a lack of abundant broadband infrastructure and robust connectivity services in many cases these communities are planning administering managing and sometimes owning digital networks and technologies They are also applying these technologies to deliver broadband enabled public and community services in areas like health education government culture and language Despite decades of innovative community based work in this area to our knowledge this is the first comprehensive study and record of these activities This publication is also available in French 35 F Publication 27 2011 April Videoconferencing User Guide for Teachers and Students Participating in Post Secondary Education Courses in Remote and Rural First Nations Communities Read more Reference Woodman Simmonds J Wasacase T Ward S O Donnell S 2011 Videoconferencing User Guide for Teachers and Students Participating in Post Secondary Education Courses in Remote and Rural First Nations Communities Fredericton The VideoCom Project Abstract This user guide is for teachers and students involved in post secondary distance education especially in remote and rural First Nations communities who are considering using videoconferencing technology to communicate It assumes that some people will have little or no experience with videoconferencing and might also have objections to the technology itself or to the ways it is often marketed as an absolute solution to accessing quality education Publication 26 2011 February Post Secondary Distance Education for First Nations Métis and Inuit Learners Living in Remote and Rural Communities An Annotated Bibliography Read more Reference Woodman Simmonds J Wasacase T O Donnell S 2010 Post Secondary Distance Education for First Nations Métis and Inuit Learners Living in Remote and Rural Communities An Annotated Bibliography Fredericton The VideoCom Project Abstract This report was prepared to assist educators and people involved in education and learning in First Nations Métis and Inuit communities It is to our knowledge the most comprehensive annotated bibliography available on this topic The bibliographic search focused on literature that discusses 1 best practices employed in post secondary distance education in First Nations Métis and Inuit communities 2 funding for post secondary distance education and 3 policy issues related to ICT in the First Nations and Inuit contexts Our report includes both peer reviewed publications and grey literature Publication 23 2010 May Information and Communication Technologies to Support Health and Wellness in Remote and Rural First Nations Communities Read more Reference O Donnell S Molyneaux H Gorman E Milliken M Chong

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/resources/publications/reports/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Popular Articles, Briefs, Misc Publications | FirstMile
    to retain copyright for First Nations for articles published in journals books and other publications The licence can be used instead of signing over copyright to a publisher for works produced by authors working with First Nations We have made this licence template available in Word format so that it can be modified and used by other First Nation authors organizations and projects Our template is based on the licence used by the Government of Canada to retain copyright for the Crown for articles published by authors who are government employees we believe that by using this licence the copyright is retained by First Nations for articles published by authors working with First Nations Publication 5 2008 April Videoconferencing Connects Remote Communities Read more Reference O Donnell S and Kakepetum Schultz T 2008 Videoconferencing Connects Remote Communities Sagatay April May Abstract This short article describes community uses of videoconferencing by remote communities in Northwestern Ontario It was published in the in flight magazine of Wasaya Airways Publication 4 2008 March Encouraging Urban Organizations to Videoconference with Remote and Rural First Nations Read more Reference VideoCom Research Initiative 2008 Encouraging Urban Organizations to Videoconference with Remote and Rural First Nations VideoCom Research Update March Abstract This one page report summarizes recent research that underlines the need to encourage urban organizations to use videoconferencing to meet the communication needs of remote and rural First Nation communities Search for Latest News Guide Federal Funding for Indigenous Broadband Report Digital Technology Adoption in Northern and Remote Indigenous Communities in Canada MWC gets SSHRC Knowledge Synthesis grant for literature review FMCC team presents at CRTC BSO hearings IsumaTV Builds Innovative Digital Systems to Share High Def Streaming Video in Low Speed Remote Communities Recent Comments Archives Archives Select Month April 2016 March 2016 January 2016

    Original URL path: http://firstmile.ca/resources/publications/articles-briefs-misc-publications/ (2016-04-30)
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