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  • cyborgblog: Congenitally blind cyborgs don't have to be blind either
    generation to generation in some families and can lead to blindness Disabling the gene is a step toward developing a gene therapy to treat people with retinitis pigmentosa an inherited disease that attacks the light sensing cells in the eye It affects about one in 60 000 people with an estimated 1 5 million people afflicted worldwide One of the causes of the disease is mutated gene expression said Marina Gorbatyuk an assistant professor of molecular genetics and microbiology in the UF College of Medicine We work with rhodopsin which is the main retinal protein Without it or if it is mutated people simply won t see posted by Allison Muri at 11 07 AM 0 Comments Post a Comment Home Headlesschicken Allison Muri University of Saskatchewan Previous Posts Cyborgs don t have to be blind Cyborg Symposium MIT this May New Minds New Bo Brain implant rats and other cyberbeings Technotranscendence Doctor Who Cyberman Voice Changer Helmet Toys G A new approach for a brain machine interface SCIENCE Group Seeks Ban on Living Machines Captain Cyborg sighting by The Register Lovestruck cyborgs set the scene for really strang Samantha Bee interviews a cyborg www cyborgblog Other Cyborg Info Wikipedia

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/cyborgblog/2007/03/congenitally-blind-cyborgs-dont-have.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book: Digital Copyright
    up a business model that primarily relies on legal activity that gives them every incentive to maximize the amount of legal activity that their business encourages and gives them a disincentive to engage in any attempt to reduce that legal activity Another issue is this kind of idea that I think I was hearing you express which is that any kind of innovation is meritorious in and of itself The law has for a long time separated between good innovations and bad innovations and has created disincentives to coming up with bad innovations Some people come up with some pretty good drug paraphernalia Maybe there s a great new bong out there an innovative way of smoking marijuana The law says that type of technology the paraphernalia is illegal because it s tied to a particular illegal activity It promotes that illegal activity So it s not a radical idea for the law to balance is this a good innovation or a bad innovation Are we giving the right incentives to innovators to create a new technology or business that is going to promote a socially beneficial behaviour von Lohmann He s basically saying the Soviet five year plan is what we should have in America right We should have government decide before each new invention comes out is that a naughty invention or is that a good invention And given the relative power of the lobbying of the various approaches you see up here frankly I ask you what kind of an innovation environment does an American high technology economy need Does it need an environment where innovators invent first And then if regulation is required if in fact the new technology turns out to be the super bong of tomorrow as Mr French suggests then okay fine No one is suggesting that Congress does not have the power to regulate specific technologies if it feels that it is necessary Unfortunately what the copyright owners are arguing in the Grokster case what they are seeking is the opposite rule a rule that you ask permission first before you innovate and only after copyright owners decide that they will allow it in other words they decide not to lower the hammer of multimillion dollar litigation costs only then do you get to invent 428 MB Q This question is about the recording industry going after the original Napster I enjoyed the original Napster not just for the free music but because of the the volumes and volumes of music that you could find on there And I enjoyed it because it came as MP3 so that I could do pretty much whatever I wanted with it I certainly would have been willing to pay for it and there are studies that say people would have paid for it I can t understand why the other recording companies didn t try to work out something Vaidhyanathan We shouldn t idealize the original Napster It was a really stupid company It burned through 20 million of venture capital money and didn t make a dime It ended up with the most skeletal of assets basically its logo 311 MB Q What about the other companies like Kazaa Why is it still there Sherman Because what they did was they took advice from certain lawyers who explained how to get around the Napster decision which basically said because there was a centralized index where all the names were they therefore had the ability to know where a request would have been made for an infringing song and they would have stopped it von Lohmann To give a slightly less biased view of that story 233 MB Q Avery Kotler What kind of a business model do we want Can we reach a consensus 244 MB Q Why won t you let me pay the artist for the features I want Sherman What about the Apple DRM offends you Is it that you re only allowed to make ten burns of a playlist Q All of it Sherman It bothers you that you can only copy your songs eight times Q Everything about it von Lohmann If in fact there was any empirical basis for your claim Cary that DRM was actually keeping the music off the filesharing networks and preventing it from being widely distributed among Internet users then I could see some sense to it but the empirical reality is a glaring refutation of that argument every single day 196 MB Q I think the problem with the MPAA and the RIAA is that you guys have been consistently one step behind where everybody else is DRMs aren t going to work and iTunes isn t going to work and p2p is here to stay When are you going to embrace p2p as something that s here to stay and when are you going to use it to help develop your business model to sell these albums 282 MB Q I would like you to address the international aspect because over the past years there has been a stronger movement towards harmonizing intellectual property laws in the entire world Let s say we were in a utopian society in your view where no illegal filesharing existed that was based in the United States and you kept pursuing all the new technologies and they all moved abroad the way a lot of technologies do How would you feel that would affect innovation in the United States Sherman These Kazaa developers are not great technologists who have come up with great innovations who are figuring out how to make things better for people These are fly by night profiteers who are trying to make money on a thing while they can Vaidhyanathan Exactly like the American music industry fatted itself exactly like the American film industry fatted itself this country was a fly by night pirate nation for most of its history The American publishing industry was built on stealing works from England The

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/media/index.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book
    any operating system For the avoidance of doubt and by example only you may not install or use the Software on any a mobile devices set top boxes STB handhelds phones web pads tablets and Tablet PCs that are not running Windows XP or Vista Tablet PC Edition game consoles TVs DVD players media centers excluding Windows XP Media Center Edition and its successors electronic billboards or other digital signage

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/texts/adobe.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book
    On the copyright claims in these legal notices The fact that no one ever seems to question those legal notices for such publishers underscores our willing acceptance of the idea that copyright is a good and necessary legal protection for both authors and publishers the authors have legal protection of the fruits of their hard mental labour and original creations and the publishing companies have legal protection for the considerable investments involved in producing the material This seems fair and legitimate right However Oxford and Merriam Webster are forbidding you to systematically copy display online or re publish or sell definitions that are in many cases the fruits of a long and profitable use of stolen shared work Let s compare these 20th century definitions to a few from dictionaries produced in the 17th and 18th centuries Nomo lexikon A Law dictionary Interpreting Such Difficult and Obscure Words and Terms as are Found Either in our Common or Statute Ancient or Modern Lawes by Thomas Blount 1670 an unlawful Felonious taking away another mans moveable and personable Goods against the owners will with an intent to Steal them See Larceny and Felony Cyclopædia or An Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences Ephraim Chambers London 1728 in Law an an unlawful felonious taking away another man s moveable and personal Goods against the Owner s Will with an intent to steal them See Larceny A Compleat English Dictionary Containing the True Meaning of All Words in the English Language by Benjamin Norton Defoe Westminster 1735 the Act of stealing Robbery A Dictionary of the English Language in Which the Words are Deduced from their Originals Explained in their Different Meanings by Samuel Johnson London 1756 1 The act of stealing Cowel 2 The thing stolen Exodus A New Complete English Dictionary

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/texts/18thcdictionaries.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book
    the brave soldier not the princess but the beautiful princess not the oak but the sturdy oak Literate societies he claims reject these as cumbersome and tiresomely redundant because of their aggregative weight 38 it tends to be redundant or copious Ong says that while writing establishes a line of continuity outside of the mind redundancy or repetition of the just said in oral discourse prevents both the listener and the speaker from losing track of the words which disappear as soon as they are spoken Early written texts through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance are often bloated with amplification annoyingly redundant by modern standards writes Ong 41 there is a tendency for it to be conservative or traditionalist In an oral culture knowledge that isn t repeated will vanish Ong writes oral societies must invest great energy in saying over and over again what has been learned arduously over the ages This need establishes a highly traditionalist or conservative set of mind that with good reason inhibits intellectual experimentation 41 thought is conceptualized and then expressed with more or less close reference to the human lifeworld An oral culture has no vehicle so neutral as a list writes Ong 42 He suggests that in an oral society abstract itemized lists such as names of leaders and other abstract descriptions such as geneology political information or navigation procedures are embedded in a narrative that places them in the context of human action expression is agonistically toned combative Ong says that Writing fosters abstractions that disengage knowledge from the arena where human beings struggle with one another 43 4 Oral expression he says is characterized by verbal contests and portrayals of gross physical violence He suggests violence in oral art forms is connected with the structure of orality itself When

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/orality.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book
    A valley stream strode across me And left a dark path A pious man clothed me In boards then hauled hide across me Bedecked with gold I was glad to be bound by The smith s fine work of wire around me Now the decorations and the dye of red In such wonderous forms give wider fame To the people s protector from the pains of hell If the children of men choose to enjoy me They shall be safer and surer of victory Mightier of heart happier of mind Wiser of spirit wealthier in friends Who are dearer and faster more faithful and better Kinder and fairer who foster glory With fondest love and fellowship Kindness links them its loving embrace Holding them soundly Say what I am That is needful to man My name is famous A giver of healing and holy too Mec feonda sum feore besnyþede woruldstrenga binom wætte siþþan dyfde on wætre dyde eft þonan sette on sunnan þær ic swiþe beleas herum þam þe ic hæfde Heard mec siþþan snað seaxses ecg sindrum begrunden fingras feoldan ond mec fugles wyn geond speddropum spyrede geneahhe ofer brunne brerd beamtelge swealg streames dæle stop eft on

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/texts/26thriddle.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book
    Middle English Lyrics Nu goth Sonne under wode Nu goth Sonne under wode Me rueth Mary thy faire rode Nu goth Sonne under tree Me rueth Mary thy Sone and thee Now goes the sun under the wood forest or

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/texts/nowgothsonne.html (2015-04-05)
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  • The History and Future of the Book
    meadow forest now Awe bleteth after lomb Lhouth after calve cu Bulluc sterteth bucke ferteth Murie sing cuccu Cuccu cuccu Wel singes thu cuccu Ne swik thu naver nu ewe lows cow jumps billy goat farts merrily well you sing nor cease never Sing cuccu nu sing cuccu Sing cuccu sing cuccu nu Sumer is icumen in from MS Harley 978 is one of the best known Middle English lyrics

    Original URL path: http://headlesschicken.ca/eng204/texts/sumer_is_icumen.html (2015-04-05)
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