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  • Factor Replacement Therapy - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    defined as all conditions both congenital and acquired characterized by a factor deficiency including factor I deficiency fibrinogen deficiency factor II deficiency prothrombin deficiency factor V deficiency factor VII deficiency Alexander s Disease factor VIII deficiency hemophilia A factor IX deficiency hemophilia B factor X deficiency Stuart Prower Deficiency factor XI deficiency hemophilia C factor XIII deficiency von Willebrand factor deficiency von Willebrand Disease platelet function disorders The ultimate goal of effective factor replacement therapy for bleeding disorders is the provision of the safest most effective products as defined by the most advanced medical and technological knowledge in optimal quantity to enable people with bleeding disorders to lead full and productive lives It is the mission of the Canadian Hemophilia Society to ensure that the products required to attain this high quality of treatment are provided within the context of comprehensive care universally accessible to all Canadians 2 2 Optimal Quality Factor replacement products should meet the criteria for optimal quality as defined by standards in three areas safety therapeutic value and choice of product 2 2 1 Safety a Products must be free of all known disease causing agents or contaminants b Products must demonstrate the lowest possible risk of transmitting unknown disease causing agents or contaminants c While it is acknowledged that no blood product can be guaranteed to be completely safe the Canadian blood system must strive to provide factor replacement products that are equal to or superior to the highest international standards d There must be a vein to vein tracking system for all factor replacement products which are derived from plasma which contain plasma derivatives or which use plasma derivatives in their manufacturing e There must be an effective system for reporting and evaluating adverse reactions f An effective emergency response and notification system is required to ensure that all factor replacement products can be recalled within set time limits See 2 6 Effective Recalls and Recipient Notification g The regulatory body Health Canada must have the necessary resources both financial and human to do effective post marketing surveillance of approved factor replacement products h The Canadian Blood Services and Héma Québec must have sufficient reserve funds to enable them to respond independently to any emergency situation without needing to obtain prior approval from Ministers of Health i All levels of safety currently including donor screening testing of individual donations for all known contaminants plasma pool testing purification filtration viral inactivation by approved methods and end product testing must be in place where appropriate j All plasma derived factor replacement products must be treated with at least two proven effective viral inactivation processes for example nano filtration heat treatment or solvent detergent k Vaccination for those at risk for blood borne viral infections must be provided where appropriate l Treatment protocols must be developed for all types of factor replacement therapy to ensure that these valuable resources are being used in accordance with the most recent scientific knowledge 2 2 2 Therapeutic Value a Factor replacement products must create hemostasis stop bleeding within an appropriate time interval b Products must not lead to an increased risk of inhibitors c Products must not negatively affect immune function d Primary prophylaxis regular infusions to prevent bleeding provided on a permanent basis and secondary prophylaxis regular infusions to prevent bleeding in a target joint provided on a temporary basis must be provided where indicated e The elimination of animal and human proteins as stabilizers in the final formulation or as nutrients in the cell culture or in any other part of the process should be considered as a goal in terms of the quality of recombinant products 2 2 3 Choice of Product Quality therapy implies that a patient and his her physician have the option to choose products which meet that patient s individual needs a The decision as to choice of product should be made jointly by the physician and the patient or his guardian b Access to a range of products to meet individual patient needs must be provided c Any long term supply contracts or other long term commitments of provincial funds must include penalty clauses for non respect of contract provisions They must also include provisions for opting to the supplier s latest state of the art factor replacement products 2 2 4 Provision of Information on Clotting Factor Concentrates to Consumers a As the patient or his her immediate caregiver is ultimately autonomous in accepting or refusing any proposed treatment the CHS believes that complete information on the risks benefits and alternatives to clotting factor concentrates must be available The primary source for such information is the prescribing physician however the CHS should also play a role in ensuring the appropriate distribution of accurate balanced information on clotting factor concentrates See separate policy entitled A Framework for Community Education and Interaction with Companies in the Pharmaceutical Industry b The CHS will not reproduce in its own publications literature originally published by pharmaceutical companies but will exercise its own journalistic control c The promotion of factor concentrates or other drugs is acceptable only in defined circumstances such as clearly marked company kiosks at CHS information meetings or presentations within medical symposia When such events occur all pharmaceutical companies in the Canadian market must be invited Information distributed must be approved under the provisions of the Pharmaceutical Advertising Advisory Board and or the Health Protection Act d The CHS will not accept advertising of factor concentrates or other drugs in its publications Brand names of factor concentrates or other drugs may be included in publications for information purposes When this occurs a disclaimer similar to the following will be included Brand names of treatment products are provided for information only Their inclusion is not an endorsement of a particular product or company 2 2 5 Post Marketing Surveillance a In support of post marketing surveillance for detection of blood borne diseases the Canadian Hemophilia Society endorses the Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/public-affairs/chs-policy-on-blood--blood-products-and-their-alternatives/factor-replacement-therapy/ (2014-10-09)
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  • Fixing CAMR: the campaign, supported by the Canadian Hemophilia Society, continues - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    I deficiency Fibrinogen deficiency Factor II deficiency Prothrombin deficiency Factor V deficiency Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Factor X deficiency Factor XI deficiency Hemophilia C Factor XII deficiency Factor XIII deficiency Summary Chart Platelet function disorders Introduction Symptoms of platelet function disorders Diagnosis of platelet function disorders Types of platelet function disorders Treatment of platelet function disorders Precautions PDF documents Clotting factor concentrates Women Inherited bleeding disorders affecting women Symptoms Diagnosis Inheritance Medical treatment options for menorrhagia and other symptoms Gynaecological treatment options for menorrhagia Precautions for pregnant women Staying healthy Bleeding disorder treatment centres Educational resources Stories from women and girls who bleed too much About the CHS Support and Education Passport to well being Destination fitness Home care The road to independence Roadmap for managing pain Navigating the emergency department Bon Voyage Travelling with a bleeding disorder Charting Your Course PEP Parents Empowering Parents program Vocational assessment tool Career planning and scholarship links Scholarship Program Federal and Provincial Support Programs Insurance coverage Educational Material Printed documents Bleeding disorders in women Carriers of hemophilia A or B Hemophilia Hepatitis C HIV Inhibitors Physical activity and sports Platelet function disorders Rare factor deficiencies Relevant to all bleeding disorders Resources for children Von Willebrand disease Videos Care and Treatment Emergency Care Pain Management Nursing Physiotherapy Introduction Constitution of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care CPHC Standards of Physiotherapy Care and Assessment Selected Journal Articles Educational material Bibliography Other resources Social Work Community Partners and Links Practice Guidelines Mission Services Interventions Standards of Practice Comprehensive Care Standards Safe Secure Blood Supply Products in the pipeline CHS Policy on Paid Plasma Donations Report Cards on Canada s Blood System 2008 2010 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2005 2007 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2003 2004 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2002 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 1999 Report Card on Canada s Blood System Inhibitor rates related to treatment product in previously untreated patients Statement from the WFH variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease vCJD CHS position on donor deferrals CHS position on HIV O deferral in Africa Hemophilia Research Million Dollar Club Research CHS Dream of a Cure Research Program General Criteria General Conditions Application Forms Summer Studentships in Inherited Bleeding Disorders Research CHS Research Grants for 2014 CHS Research Grants for 2013 CHS Research Grants for 2012 CHS Research Grants for 2011 CHS Research Grants for 2010 CHS Research Grants for 2009 CHS Research Grants for 2008 CHS Research Grants for 2007 CHS Research Grants for 2006 CHS Research Grants for 2005 The CHS Pfizer Care Until Cure Research Program General Criteria General Conditions Application Form Research Projects Funded in 2014 Research Projects Funded in 2013 Research Projects Funded in 2012 Research Projects Funded in 2011 Research Projects Funded in 2010 Research Projects Funded in 2009 Research Projects Funded in 2008 Research Projects Funded in 2007 Research Projects Funded in 2006 Research Projects Funded in 2005 CHS Novo Nordisk Psychosocial

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/public-affairs/fixing-camr--the-campaign--supported-by-the-canadian-hemophilia-society--continues/ (2014-10-09)
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  • Blood Injury Compensation Scheme - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    those who are weak with respect to even one of these factors has a difficult time in presenting a successful case With specific reference to the Canadian blood system there is also a problem in finding unbiased experts in a system that has traditionally been a quasi monopoly Moreover even with the proposed functional changes to the blood system it will still by its very nature be a relatively small closed system with extremely few informed experts within the system who would be willing to testify against the decisions reached by either themselves or their colleagues in that system Moreover in wrongful injury suits one can still face the problem of not being able to prove a practice is negligent simply because such a determination is usually reached by looking at how other medical experts in the same situation reacted Put simply this can lead to a situation where if the prevailing standard of the industry falls short in some large part this will not be held to be negligence as the defendant did in fact meet the prevailing standard of care at the time To reduce this argument further it can be put the following way if everyone is doing it it is by definition not negligent In short it can be argued that legal cases involving medical malpractice with respect to the blood system are extremely complicated cases to argue and that they are not ideally suited to our traditional tort system It is our submission that a system such as the one existing now which focuses on the determination of negligence can be inappropriate for complicated cases of this nature Much of the impetus for an altenative compensation scheme arises out of the difficulties our HIV infected members experienced in attempting to gain compensation for the injury done to them in the mid 1980 s HIV was devastating in that most of our members lacked the energy resources and more importantly the time to enter a traditional wrongful injury suit in search of compensation Compensation gained after the initiation of a lawsuit did little good if the wronged person was dead before he ever saw any of it Secondly neither the continuing stress of proving your case nor the resultant pressure to divert funds from drugs therapies and dietary supplements to legal costs was likely helpful in any attempt to maintain good health Finally dying individuals might have spent their remaining life in more productive pursuits than in chasing numerous defendants through the court system in a process where nothing was guaranteed It is worth noting that even though a number of our members pursued the legal option the vast majority proceeded to drop their lawsuits once an alternative compensation mechanism was proposed General goals Of key importance is the fact that there exist several different no fault systems each incorporating varying degrees of fault please see the section ahead on types of no fault for details In general there are three major goals that can be identified in wrongful injury lawsuits the distributive justice goal the corrective or retributive justice goal and the deterrence goal Ideally of course all three goals would be achieved by the blood injury compensation system we are proposing A Distributive justice Under the distributive justice goal of key importance is the well being of the victim and the community as opposed to individual responsibility for the injury That is to say each individual s well being is the collective resposibility of the community at large for example damage to an individual s health by a medically approved procedure such as a vaccination would be compensated by a financial package to the individual with no finding of direct fault on the part of any individual medical doctor medical institution a hospital or for example the Canadian Red Cross or government agency This goal is future looking and focuses on meaningful compensation to be provided at low cost B Corrective retributive justice Corrective justice emphasises the fact that an individual s autonomy has been violated by another s intentional or negligent wrong doing and the fact that such individuals must be restored to their previous pre injury status That is to say any injury suffered by an individual will be compensated for in some way by the individual or organization found legally responsible for that harm This goal focuses on individual responsibility and is past looking in nature C Deterrence The deterrence objective focuses on cost minimization associated with injury That is to say an individual injury or wrong is compensated for with an amount large enough to scare any future potential wrong doers from attempting the same act It is a future oriented goal in that it induces potential injurers to avoid high risk activities One note of caution must be exercised however that we do not replace one flawed system with another in enthusiasm for change borne of dissatisfaction 2 Carolyn Sappideen illustrates that advocates of more or less pure no fault liability regard the issue of equity a distributive justice goal between injured patients as critical By definition any no fault system strongly promotes the distributive justice goal Although a no fault system is not opposed to the goal of deterrence it would appear to seriously lack any strength to fulfil the corrective justice goal Emphasis on fault leads to a corrective justice ideal which at its core stresses the one to one the eye for an eye nature of the dispute between private parties that is separated from the larger concerns of society 3 Of course the specific nature of the scheme is vital in order to be able to assess how well the three goals of distributive justice corrective justice and deterrence are met According to Richard A Schmalz every compensation system is a loss distribution mechanism a more or less organized way of providing compensation for persons who are injured and then shifting the costs to others instead of leaving them where they first fall 4 Specific no fault sytem design goals Keeton 5 has suggested some very broad goals regarding the design of a no fault system A be equitable as between those who receive its benefits those who bear its costs among the different beneficiaries and among the different cost bearers B contribute to the protection enhancement and appropriate allocation of human and economic resources C compensate promptly D be reliable and predictable E distribute losses F be efficient in minimizing waste and cost G avoid inducements and if feasible provide deterrence and H minimize risk of exaggeration fraud and opportunity for profit from such conduct Types of no fault A Comprehensive no fault At the polar extreme from the wrongful injury lawsuit lies a comprehensive no fault system a system which bars access to the common law system Ideally a pure comprehensive no fault system would provide compensation to victims with a minimum of trauma and with greater speed than the present system Comprehensive no fault would involve all medical injuries There would be minimal notions of fault entailed 6 That is finding of fault would be minimalized and perhaps fault would never be assigned to any individual or organization It has one simple goal for every injury there should be compensation regardless of circumstances wholly without regard to fault of the injurer or person injured We would not be trying directly to alter or improve the conduct or habits of individuals but to raise the quality of life generally 7 This is a very needs based concept The focus of a comprehensive no fault system would be on the distributive justice goal A pure no fault scheme would mean moving away from the wrongful injury suit related corrective retributive justice ideal A pure no fault system would also imply a movement away from the wrongful injury suit related deterrence ideal which is an efficiency oriented goal That is the deterrence ideal is effecient because it prevents hopefully such wrongful injury related suits in the future B Neo no fault Neo no fault i e new no fault encourages injured patients to settle claims in accordance with their net economic losses This form allows for the injured party to proceed via the common law system if no offer of compensation is made 8 C Administrative no fault Administrative no fault also exists and would involve some modifications to the wrongful injury system It provides compensation for net economic losses Once an offer is made the plaintiff would be foreclosed from suing for non economic losses and the defendant would be obliged to cover the plaintiff s economic losses as long as the injury persisted Experienced and expert adjudicators employed by specialized medical boards 9 would review claims expeditiously That is a patient wrongfully injured would be prevented from suing for other damages once the defendant had made an offer of compensation for economic losses D Designated compensable event D C E Schemes Designated compensable event schemes also exist which provide no fault compensation for specific types of medical injuries whether narrowly defined or as part of a more general scheme for compensating medical injuries 10 E Elective no fault Finally an elective no fault system allows the injured to choose between a wrongful injury suit and a no fault option 11 Please note that one of our recommendations will be a proposal that this be the type of system implemented regarding injuries incurred through the blood supply Elective no fault allows for the deterrence objective to be fulfilled at least with regards to the most clear cut pro plaintiff cases This ensures that individuals or organizations causing injury will invest enough resources to prevent injury in future because the wrongful injury suit system acts like a stick There are examples of no fault schemes which completely bar wrongful injury action such as the Virginia Birth Related Neurological Injury Compensation Act which is a pure no fault system and which therefore has no element of fault directly associated with injury Under that Act according to David Duff 12 the individual or organization causing the injury is not capable of influencing the outcome However he points out that a knowledge of the person or persons causally responsible for the injury is essential to the identification of the entity or entities to be deterred 13 In other words in order for deterrence to happen the individuals or organizations at fault will have to be acknowledged and named He goes on to say that there is no way under the Virginia Act to measure the degree to which injury is avoidable under a suitable standard of medical care and therefore no way to measure the proper degree of injury prevention that was possible In contrast opening the door to the wrongful injury system under an elective no fault system would directly link individual responsibility to injury and would therefore clearly induce deterrence in future Richard Mahoney discusses New Zealand s comprehensive no fault system which effectively bars wrongful injury action and thus hurts particularly those victims who would have been able to clearly ascribe fault to another entity He states that there is no theoretical or practical impediment to a dual system which would allow for the continued existence of personal injury litigation for such plaintiffs alongside the scheme thereby preserving traditional rights in tandem with those afforded to the no fault victim 14 In other words he suggests that there is no reason why wrongful personal injury lawsuits cannot exist alongside the no fault scheme and thus preserve traditional legal rights along with those rights provided to a no fault victim Moreover one advantage of elective no fault is that unlike a comprehensive no fault scheme valuable resources will not be wasted on claimants wanting to keep clear cut cases out of a pure no fault scheme again one which bars worngful injury action completely and potential defendants wanting to keep clear cut cases within the no fault scheme to avoid being sued 15 It is important to realize that a no fault system is being proposed here for reasons having nothing to do with the cost control rationale often advanced in other situations In the present case we are not arguing that escalating malpractice claims are threatening to bankrupt the providers of blood and blood products Rather an alternative compensation plan is being proposed as a compassionate plan to ensure that injured blood product recipients have an alternative that can provide quick and adequate compensation through a relatively non adversarial process There should also be recognition that the wrongful injury system is not always inappropriate for people injured through the use of blood and blood products There were and there always will be some individuals who because of their financial resources or desire for retributive justice or good state of health or a relatively simple factual situation are in a position to pursue the traditional personal injury remedy For all its failings it does tend to be more generous and to provide a feeling of retributive justice a feature often lacking in other alternative systems In sum individuals should have the right to pursue the remedy that is best for them given their circumstances While it is likely that the existence of a no fault compensation system would discourage utilization of the regular judicial system this should by no means become the raison d etre for the creation of the alternative system For these reasons we are strongly recommending that any proposed alternative compensation mechanism be an elective no fault system It is absolutely essential that the traditional wrongful injury remedy be preserved for those individuals who might wish to pursue this option rather than an alternative compensation mechanism Moreover as will be proposed in more detail the existing judicial system should also continue to play an important role as a mode of appeal on certain issues for those who did proceed under the alternative insurance scheme Design of no fault The question of cost in the design of a system is one of the most significant barriers to any new scheme It is true that a no fault system may save on administrative costs compared to the present system of personal injury suits as many such schemes have restrictions and CHSedules regarding non financial losses and most involve compensation based solely on causation 16 However this could very well be outweighed by the sheer number of uncompensated victims of medical misadventure being compensated under a no fault system Obviously being more specific as to who qualifies for compensation in order to limit the numbers being compensated has to be weighed against the possibility of being too restrictive a situation which would leave too many uncompensated As with many important decisions trade offs such as cost vs equity are inherent in the design of a no fault scheme One of the most difficult aspects of design is thus along with the level of benefits the definition of the boundary line which distinguishes compensable from non compensable results within the pool of claimants determines how much aggregate compensation will be paid 17 Needless to say moving in the direction of a comprehensive system ceteris paribus is likely to increase total costs In those circumstances where the insurance fund finds that no causal link is present the applicant would have the right to appeal such a determination to a court of competent jurisdiction for a finding in relation to that issue only Appeals would proceed as any case under a wrongful injury lawsuit albeit without the necessity of having to prove negligence D Access to the wrongful injury tort system As stressed in the section describing elective no fault it is strongly recommended that the blood injury compensation scheme be an elective no fault scheme in which individuals injured through the use of blood blood products or their substitutes in the Canadian medical system have the choice of applying for compensation for their injury through the blood injury compensation scheme or alternatively proceeding with their claim through the Canadian tort system Should the injured individual accept benefits from the blood injury compensation scheme they would automatically subrogate their rights to Transfusion Canada to bring suit against any negligent defendant It is further proposed that the claimant should be entitled to a proportion i e ten per cent of any claim successfully litigated by Transfusion Canada The ten per cent received by the victim would be independent of any compensation received through the blood injury compensation scheme Allowing Transfusion Canada to sue on behalf of the victim after that claimant has accepted compensation from the blood injury compensation scheme would satisfy the deterrence objective of wrongful injury law as it would directly link the injury to the injurer i e it would determine fault Thus deterrence would be achieved in concert with the distributive justice goal since the claimant would simultaneously be receiving compensation through the blood injury compensation scheme Moreover by providing the claimant with a portion of a successfully litigated claim the claimant would be provided with an incentive to cooperate in the litigation process as they would be compensated by receiving ten per cent of the award for their time and effort provided Transfusion Canada wins of course It also seems equitable to provide the injured party with a share of an award which but for their injury would not have been awarded to Transfusion Canada and it would partially compensate in those situations where the court award is in excess of what Transfusion Canada pays the claimant E Quantification of damages determination of levels of compensation The traditional legal methods of ascertaining costs should be used and the potential recipient should have access to legal appeal if it is felt that the Insurance fund has inadequately assessed those costs In this way the wrongful injury system acts as a competitor to the proposed blood injury compensation scheme and vice versa Of key importance is the fact that under the new scheme compensation levels would be

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/public-affairs/blood-injury-compensation-scheme/ (2014-10-09)
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  • Corporate Philanthropy - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    of von Willebrand disease Heredity of von Willebrand disease Symptoms of von Willebrand disease Diagnosis of von Willebrand disease Treatment options for von Willebrand disease Introduction Recommended Treatments for Men and Women Not Recommended Treatments Recommended Treatments for Women with Gynecological Complications Living with von Willebrand disease Comprehensive care Safety of Blood Products Nose bleeds Conception Pregnancy and Childbirth Medication to Be Avoided Exercise Fitness and Sports Child Care and Schooling Employment Insurance Travelling Medical Identification Final word Where to get more information Hemophilia Bleeding Disorder Treatment Centres Glossary Bibliography Other factor deficiencies Factor I deficiency Fibrinogen deficiency Factor II deficiency Prothrombin deficiency Factor V deficiency Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Factor X deficiency Factor XI deficiency Hemophilia C Factor XII deficiency Factor XIII deficiency Summary Chart Platelet function disorders Introduction Symptoms of platelet function disorders Diagnosis of platelet function disorders Types of platelet function disorders Treatment of platelet function disorders Precautions PDF documents Clotting factor concentrates Women Inherited bleeding disorders affecting women Symptoms Diagnosis Inheritance Medical treatment options for menorrhagia and other symptoms Gynaecological treatment options for menorrhagia Precautions for pregnant women Staying healthy Bleeding disorder treatment centres Educational resources Stories from women and girls who bleed too much About the CHS Support and Education Passport to well being Destination fitness Home care The road to independence Roadmap for managing pain Navigating the emergency department Bon Voyage Travelling with a bleeding disorder Charting Your Course PEP Parents Empowering Parents program Vocational assessment tool Career planning and scholarship links Scholarship Program Federal and Provincial Support Programs Insurance coverage Educational Material Printed documents Bleeding disorders in women Carriers of hemophilia A or B Hemophilia Hepatitis C HIV Inhibitors Physical activity and sports Platelet function disorders Rare factor deficiencies Relevant to all bleeding disorders Resources for children Von Willebrand disease Videos Care and Treatment Emergency Care Pain Management Nursing Physiotherapy Introduction Constitution of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care CPHC Standards of Physiotherapy Care and Assessment Selected Journal Articles Educational material Bibliography Other resources Social Work Community Partners and Links Practice Guidelines Mission Services Interventions Standards of Practice Comprehensive Care Standards Safe Secure Blood Supply Products in the pipeline CHS Policy on Paid Plasma Donations Report Cards on Canada s Blood System 2008 2010 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2005 2007 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2003 2004 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2002 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 1999 Report Card on Canada s Blood System Inhibitor rates related to treatment product in previously untreated patients Statement from the WFH variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease vCJD CHS position on donor deferrals CHS position on HIV O deferral in Africa Hemophilia Research Million Dollar Club Research CHS Dream of a Cure Research Program General Criteria General Conditions Application Forms Summer Studentships in Inherited Bleeding Disorders Research CHS Research Grants for 2014 CHS Research Grants for 2013 CHS Research Grants for 2012 CHS Research Grants for 2011 CHS Research Grants for

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/corporate-philanthropy/ (2014-10-09)
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  • Baxter - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    of hemophilia The symptoms of hemophilia The diagnosis of hemophilia The treatment of hemophilia Comprehensive hemophilia care Factor replacement therapy Other treatments The complications of hemophilia Blood borne infections Inhibitors Joint damage Precautions Carriers of hemophilia A and B Von Willebrand disease Preface Acknowledgements An Introduction to von Willebrand disease Types of von Willebrand disease Heredity of von Willebrand disease Symptoms of von Willebrand disease Diagnosis of von Willebrand disease Treatment options for von Willebrand disease Introduction Recommended Treatments for Men and Women Not Recommended Treatments Recommended Treatments for Women with Gynecological Complications Living with von Willebrand disease Comprehensive care Safety of Blood Products Nose bleeds Conception Pregnancy and Childbirth Medication to Be Avoided Exercise Fitness and Sports Child Care and Schooling Employment Insurance Travelling Medical Identification Final word Where to get more information Hemophilia Bleeding Disorder Treatment Centres Glossary Bibliography Other factor deficiencies Factor I deficiency Fibrinogen deficiency Factor II deficiency Prothrombin deficiency Factor V deficiency Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Factor X deficiency Factor XI deficiency Hemophilia C Factor XII deficiency Factor XIII deficiency Summary Chart Platelet function disorders Introduction Symptoms of platelet function disorders Diagnosis of platelet function disorders Types of platelet function disorders Treatment of platelet function disorders Precautions PDF documents Clotting factor concentrates Women Inherited bleeding disorders affecting women Symptoms Diagnosis Inheritance Medical treatment options for menorrhagia and other symptoms Gynaecological treatment options for menorrhagia Precautions for pregnant women Staying healthy Bleeding disorder treatment centres Educational resources Stories from women and girls who bleed too much About the CHS Support and Education Passport to well being Destination fitness Home care The road to independence Roadmap for managing pain Navigating the emergency department Bon Voyage Travelling with a bleeding disorder Charting Your Course PEP Parents Empowering Parents program Vocational assessment tool Career planning and scholarship links Scholarship Program Federal and Provincial Support Programs Insurance coverage Educational Material Printed documents Bleeding disorders in women Carriers of hemophilia A or B Hemophilia Hepatitis C HIV Inhibitors Physical activity and sports Platelet function disorders Rare factor deficiencies Relevant to all bleeding disorders Resources for children Von Willebrand disease Videos Care and Treatment Emergency Care Pain Management Nursing Physiotherapy Introduction Constitution of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care CPHC Standards of Physiotherapy Care and Assessment Selected Journal Articles Educational material Bibliography Other resources Social Work Community Partners and Links Practice Guidelines Mission Services Interventions Standards of Practice Comprehensive Care Standards Safe Secure Blood Supply Products in the pipeline CHS Policy on Paid Plasma Donations Report Cards on Canada s Blood System 2008 2010 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2005 2007 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2003 2004 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2002 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 1999 Report Card on Canada s Blood System Inhibitor rates related to treatment product in previously untreated patients Statement from the WFH variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease vCJD CHS position on donor deferrals CHS position on HIV O deferral in

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/corporate-philanthropy/baxter/ (2014-10-09)
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  • CSL Behring - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    Factor replacement therapy Other treatments The complications of hemophilia Blood borne infections Inhibitors Joint damage Precautions Carriers of hemophilia A and B Von Willebrand disease Preface Acknowledgements An Introduction to von Willebrand disease Types of von Willebrand disease Heredity of von Willebrand disease Symptoms of von Willebrand disease Diagnosis of von Willebrand disease Treatment options for von Willebrand disease Introduction Recommended Treatments for Men and Women Not Recommended Treatments Recommended Treatments for Women with Gynecological Complications Living with von Willebrand disease Comprehensive care Safety of Blood Products Nose bleeds Conception Pregnancy and Childbirth Medication to Be Avoided Exercise Fitness and Sports Child Care and Schooling Employment Insurance Travelling Medical Identification Final word Where to get more information Hemophilia Bleeding Disorder Treatment Centres Glossary Bibliography Other factor deficiencies Factor I deficiency Fibrinogen deficiency Factor II deficiency Prothrombin deficiency Factor V deficiency Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Factor X deficiency Factor XI deficiency Hemophilia C Factor XII deficiency Factor XIII deficiency Summary Chart Platelet function disorders Introduction Symptoms of platelet function disorders Diagnosis of platelet function disorders Types of platelet function disorders Treatment of platelet function disorders Precautions PDF documents Clotting factor concentrates Women Inherited bleeding disorders affecting women Symptoms Diagnosis Inheritance Medical treatment options for menorrhagia and other symptoms Gynaecological treatment options for menorrhagia Precautions for pregnant women Staying healthy Bleeding disorder treatment centres Educational resources Stories from women and girls who bleed too much About the CHS Support and Education Passport to well being Destination fitness Home care The road to independence Roadmap for managing pain Navigating the emergency department Bon Voyage Travelling with a bleeding disorder Charting Your Course PEP Parents Empowering Parents program Vocational assessment tool Career planning and scholarship links Scholarship Program Federal and Provincial Support Programs Insurance coverage Educational Material Printed documents Bleeding disorders in women Carriers of hemophilia A or B Hemophilia Hepatitis C HIV Inhibitors Physical activity and sports Platelet function disorders Rare factor deficiencies Relevant to all bleeding disorders Resources for children Von Willebrand disease Videos Care and Treatment Emergency Care Pain Management Nursing Physiotherapy Introduction Constitution of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care CPHC Standards of Physiotherapy Care and Assessment Selected Journal Articles Educational material Bibliography Other resources Social Work Community Partners and Links Practice Guidelines Mission Services Interventions Standards of Practice Comprehensive Care Standards Safe Secure Blood Supply Products in the pipeline CHS Policy on Paid Plasma Donations Report Cards on Canada s Blood System 2008 2010 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2005 2007 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2003 2004 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2002 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 1999 Report Card on Canada s Blood System Inhibitor rates related to treatment product in previously untreated patients Statement from the WFH variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease vCJD CHS position on donor deferrals CHS position on HIV O deferral in Africa Hemophilia Research Million Dollar Club Research CHS Dream of a Cure Research Program General Criteria General

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/corporate-philanthropy/csl-behring/ (2014-10-09)
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  • Novo Nordisk - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    treatment of hemophilia Comprehensive hemophilia care Factor replacement therapy Other treatments The complications of hemophilia Blood borne infections Inhibitors Joint damage Precautions Carriers of hemophilia A and B Von Willebrand disease Preface Acknowledgements An Introduction to von Willebrand disease Types of von Willebrand disease Heredity of von Willebrand disease Symptoms of von Willebrand disease Diagnosis of von Willebrand disease Treatment options for von Willebrand disease Introduction Recommended Treatments for Men and Women Not Recommended Treatments Recommended Treatments for Women with Gynecological Complications Living with von Willebrand disease Comprehensive care Safety of Blood Products Nose bleeds Conception Pregnancy and Childbirth Medication to Be Avoided Exercise Fitness and Sports Child Care and Schooling Employment Insurance Travelling Medical Identification Final word Where to get more information Hemophilia Bleeding Disorder Treatment Centres Glossary Bibliography Other factor deficiencies Factor I deficiency Fibrinogen deficiency Factor II deficiency Prothrombin deficiency Factor V deficiency Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Factor X deficiency Factor XI deficiency Hemophilia C Factor XII deficiency Factor XIII deficiency Summary Chart Platelet function disorders Introduction Symptoms of platelet function disorders Diagnosis of platelet function disorders Types of platelet function disorders Treatment of platelet function disorders Precautions PDF documents Clotting factor concentrates Women Inherited bleeding disorders affecting women Symptoms Diagnosis Inheritance Medical treatment options for menorrhagia and other symptoms Gynaecological treatment options for menorrhagia Precautions for pregnant women Staying healthy Bleeding disorder treatment centres Educational resources Stories from women and girls who bleed too much About the CHS Support and Education Passport to well being Destination fitness Home care The road to independence Roadmap for managing pain Navigating the emergency department Bon Voyage Travelling with a bleeding disorder Charting Your Course PEP Parents Empowering Parents program Vocational assessment tool Career planning and scholarship links Scholarship Program Federal and Provincial Support Programs Insurance coverage Educational Material Printed documents Bleeding disorders in women Carriers of hemophilia A or B Hemophilia Hepatitis C HIV Inhibitors Physical activity and sports Platelet function disorders Rare factor deficiencies Relevant to all bleeding disorders Resources for children Von Willebrand disease Videos Care and Treatment Emergency Care Pain Management Nursing Physiotherapy Introduction Constitution of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care CPHC Standards of Physiotherapy Care and Assessment Selected Journal Articles Educational material Bibliography Other resources Social Work Community Partners and Links Practice Guidelines Mission Services Interventions Standards of Practice Comprehensive Care Standards Safe Secure Blood Supply Products in the pipeline CHS Policy on Paid Plasma Donations Report Cards on Canada s Blood System 2008 2010 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2005 2007 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2003 2004 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2002 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 1999 Report Card on Canada s Blood System Inhibitor rates related to treatment product in previously untreated patients Statement from the WFH variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease vCJD CHS position on donor deferrals CHS position on HIV O deferral in Africa Hemophilia Research Million Dollar Club Research CHS Dream of a

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/corporate-philanthropy/novo-nordisk/ (2014-10-09)
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  • Pfizer - Canadian Hemophilia Society
    and B Von Willebrand disease Preface Acknowledgements An Introduction to von Willebrand disease Types of von Willebrand disease Heredity of von Willebrand disease Symptoms of von Willebrand disease Diagnosis of von Willebrand disease Treatment options for von Willebrand disease Introduction Recommended Treatments for Men and Women Not Recommended Treatments Recommended Treatments for Women with Gynecological Complications Living with von Willebrand disease Comprehensive care Safety of Blood Products Nose bleeds Conception Pregnancy and Childbirth Medication to Be Avoided Exercise Fitness and Sports Child Care and Schooling Employment Insurance Travelling Medical Identification Final word Where to get more information Hemophilia Bleeding Disorder Treatment Centres Glossary Bibliography Other factor deficiencies Factor I deficiency Fibrinogen deficiency Factor II deficiency Prothrombin deficiency Factor V deficiency Combined factor V and factor VIII deficiency Factor VII deficiency Factor X deficiency Factor XI deficiency Hemophilia C Factor XII deficiency Factor XIII deficiency Summary Chart Platelet function disorders Introduction Symptoms of platelet function disorders Diagnosis of platelet function disorders Types of platelet function disorders Treatment of platelet function disorders Precautions PDF documents Clotting factor concentrates Women Inherited bleeding disorders affecting women Symptoms Diagnosis Inheritance Medical treatment options for menorrhagia and other symptoms Gynaecological treatment options for menorrhagia Precautions for pregnant women Staying healthy Bleeding disorder treatment centres Educational resources Stories from women and girls who bleed too much About the CHS Support and Education Passport to well being Destination fitness Home care The road to independence Roadmap for managing pain Navigating the emergency department Bon Voyage Travelling with a bleeding disorder Charting Your Course PEP Parents Empowering Parents program Vocational assessment tool Career planning and scholarship links Scholarship Program Federal and Provincial Support Programs Insurance coverage Educational Material Printed documents Bleeding disorders in women Carriers of hemophilia A or B Hemophilia Hepatitis C HIV Inhibitors Physical activity and sports Platelet function disorders Rare factor deficiencies Relevant to all bleeding disorders Resources for children Von Willebrand disease Videos Care and Treatment Emergency Care Pain Management Nursing Physiotherapy Introduction Constitution of the Canadian Physiotherapists in Hemophilia Care CPHC Standards of Physiotherapy Care and Assessment Selected Journal Articles Educational material Bibliography Other resources Social Work Community Partners and Links Practice Guidelines Mission Services Interventions Standards of Practice Comprehensive Care Standards Safe Secure Blood Supply Products in the pipeline CHS Policy on Paid Plasma Donations Report Cards on Canada s Blood System 2008 2010 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2005 2007 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2003 2004 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 2002 Report Card on Canada s Blood System 1999 Report Card on Canada s Blood System Inhibitor rates related to treatment product in previously untreated patients Statement from the WFH variant Creutzfeldt Jakob disease vCJD CHS position on donor deferrals CHS position on HIV O deferral in Africa Hemophilia Research Million Dollar Club Research CHS Dream of a Cure Research Program General Criteria General Conditions Application Forms Summer Studentships in Inherited Bleeding Disorders Research CHS Research Grants for 2014 CHS Research Grants for 2013

    Original URL path: http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/about-the-chs/corporate-philanthropy/pfizer/ (2014-10-09)
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