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  • Kids Help Phone: Being there | Imagine Canada
    s professional counsellors support their mental health and well being by providing one on one counseling information and resources online and by phone The organization s award winning websites are considered a model of child focused interactive design and offer counseling information and tools to encourage resilience and self care Kids Help Phone offers young people a safe non judgemental space to work through thoughts and emotions helps them to look at problems from different perspectives connects kids who need additional support to local resources in their communities offers interim care for young people on waiting lists for mental health treatment and acts as a lifeline for those who are in a crisis that threatens their safety I just wanted to say a MASSIVE thank you for helping me and talking to me during the live chat today You provided great advice and helped me figure ALOT of things You made me feel good about myself So THANK YOU SOOOOOO MUCH PS You are AWESOME young person posting on kidshelpphone ca Recent evaluation research proves that the service is highly effective leading to statistically significant changes across crucial clinical indicators such as reductions in distress and increases in clarity and confidence levels Other recent findings 43 of phone clients do not speak to anyone else about their problem before calling Kids Help Phone 96 said they received the support they hoped for and would call Kids Help Phone again if they needed help 86 of Live Chat clients say they would recommend Kids Help Phone to a friend Kids Help Phone helps some of the most under served and potentially vulnerable young people in Canada including young LGBTQ and Aboriginal clients Source kidshelpphone ca proofpositive A community based national charity Kids Help Phone is available to 6 5 million young

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/kids-help-phone-being-there (2014-10-22)
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  • Partners in Leadership: Insights for Senior Leaders and Board Members | Imagine Canada
    to budget in their busy days so they must do so wisely It s a balancing act that keeps many of them up at night Anything to help them maximize the time spent gaining information and insights is extremely valuable The senior leader perspective I would like to emphasize the importance of the Forum to my fellow leadership colleagues It will give you a holistic view of how the sector has evolved within recent years As well it will help you understand how your organization fits within the bigger evolving picture paramount in allowing you to step back and reflect A worthy investment of your time as a leader Sharing your insights and hearing those of others often sparks the ideas and solutions that will serve your organization in the years ahead Peer networking is a driving force among today s organization leaders as a way to identify new and innovative ways of doing things I hope you will join me at the forum so we can lay the foundation for sector wide initiatives currently under development Marcel Lauzière President CEO Imagine Canada The board member perspective As a member of a board a day spent at a gathering like the Partners in Leadership Forum will allow you to gain valuable insights into the sector as a whole Something which most of us don t have access to in our regular work lives The time you spend will help you become an even more successful ambassador for the organization to which you volunteer your time and talent Based on your dual role your work and volunteer experience intersect allowing you to bring a fresh perspective to Forum discussions I encourage you to attend to strengthen your contribution to your organization as we work towards a shared awareness and understanding of

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/partners-leadership-insights-senior-leaders-and-board-members (2014-10-22)
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  • How Important is Earned Income? Very. | Imagine Canada
    the raw percentage of charities reporting them would lead us to believe A majority of charities 55 report that they engage in more than one earned income activity see Figure 1 In fact nearly one quarter 23 engage in four or more Collectively earned income charities report an average of 2 7 individual activities with a median of 2 Figure 1 The majority of charities engage in more than one earned income activity The specific earned income activities that charities report are extremely varied The most common activities were charging membership fees 38 of charities and user or program fees 30 see Figure 2 Many activities are quite well known such as charging admission or performance fees 23 of charities or selling used or donated goods 12 but others are much less commonly associated with charities in the public mind such as sale of information products 5 or providing consulting services 3 The range of activities neatly demonstrates both how important earned income is to charities but also the tremendous and often publFigure 2 Charities are involved in a tremendous breadth of earned income activities icly under appreciated range of areas in which charities work Figure 2 Charities are involved in a tremendous breadth of earned income activities Earned income clearly plays an important financial role for many charities Collectively among charities that report generating earned income it accounts for an average of 31 of total organizational revenues with a median value of 20 The majority of organizations 60 say that it accounts for less than one third of total revenues though a non trivial number report a larger role see Figure 3 As one might expect some charities derive more of their revenues from earned income than others Interestingly charities that have engaged in earned income activities for longer

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/how-important-earned-income-very (2014-10-22)
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  • How to Get the (Next) Grant: 6 Tips for Successful Stewardship | Imagine Canada
    or your Executive Director write a hand written thank you card Involve the grantmaker Funders will be interested in how your project progresses so keep them in the loop Send them your newsletters and invite them to your events If possible arrange a site visit so the funder can meet the people benefitting from the grant Offering a chance to be involved will help transform your grant into a genuine and long term partnership Write a grant report whether or not it was asked for Just like grant applications expectations for grant reports differ widely by funder Some funders like the Counselling Foundation of Canada will provide you with a helpful reporting template and sample grant reports while others may not explicitly ask for a grant report at all In these cases it is still recommended that you prepare a report as grantmakers will appreciate this effort and take it into account when evaluating your future applications Share your results the good and the bad Funders are most interested in whether you achieved what you set out to do in your grant proposal Be honest Funders understand that not everything will go according to plan so don t be afraid to explain how and why things went differently If your project is long term and the outcomes are not yet clear you should highlight intermediate findings Make sure to also to include your financial statements and account for any deviances from your proposal budget If you suspect early on that original outcomes are not achievable don t wait until the grant report to discuss this with your funder Be frank about the changing circumstances and if applicable amend expected outcomes in writing Emphasize lessons learned Share the lessons you learned during your project particularly those stemming from unexpected challenges Try

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/how-get-next-grant-6-tips-successful-stewardship (2014-10-22)
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  • Is Sector Confidence Rebounding? | Imagine Canada
    be absolutely certain that they are real i e there is a chance they could be due simply to random variation in responses between different waves of the survey Figure 1 The percentages of leaders predicting that they will be better able to perform their mission could be rebounding the size of each of the individual shifts is small the fact that all of them are moving in the same direction gives us somewhat more confidence that we are seeing real changes However there is other evidence that also suggests that confidence is rebounding In mid 2012 we saw sudden drops in the number of charity leaders predicting increased revenues and paid staff numbers and jumps in the percentages predicting decreases see Figure 2 Again the most recent figures are more encouraging though the size of the changes is too small to be entirely certain that this marks the start of a reversal That said although the size of each of the individual shifts is small the fact that all of them are moving in the same direction gives us somewhat more confidence that we are seeing real changes Figure 2 The percentages of leaders predicting increases in revenue and paid staff levels appear to have stabilized though they have not returned to previous levels Organizational stress still a factor While confidence for the sector as a whole appears to be somewhat higher we should definitely not be complacent First while the most recent figures are more promising they are not as high as they were previously Second a significant number of charities are showing signs of being under stress about one half are under stress with one in seven being under high stress and their confidence levels are lower As an example they are much more likely to predict

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/sector-confidence-rebounding (2014-10-22)
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  • Recruiting the Most Senior Staff member when “the boss” is the board | Imagine Canada
    as not done until the new person has his her first successful performance review I was struck by Don s comment indicating that boards should allocate a time period of one year for hiring someone as important as an ED The job of the hiring committee is to understand the skills and experience needed evaluate any major changes in the organization and consider the strategic vision over the next few years One of key roles of the board is to develop a strategy skills competencies success factors and develop a recruitment strategy through a consultant internet etc And if we re not getting the right applicants The board needs to examine why that is Is it reputation Compensation Critical self analysis is needed For more resources on recruiting for this position see the resources available on Sector Source under Staff Involvement Policies and Practices Most notably the guide book Hiring the Right Executive Director for your Organization One size does not fit all Board Development Program Alberta and the HR Council s HR Toolkit s Getting the Right People Job Descriptions webpage Orientation and Development Step by Step A sink or swim metaphor is a common phrase in today s workplace but throwing out a life ring might save the organization a huge amount of risk Don tells us is the best way to ensure that the new ED has a successful start is to decide what is the plan for the first 30 60 90 days The hiring committee needs strategize for success by showing the new hire business plans financial plans and examples of past issues This includes meetings with stakeholders introductions to funders and the organization s staff and management team In this regard board members act as mentors to the new ED by drawing on their individual areas of expertise and experience Establish check in sessions with the board chair or hiring committee on the matter of orientation Eventually the board moves from proactive to reactive mode and it needs to be ready to assist and provide support If organizations do not invest in the orientation it will put the organization at risk cautions Don The board should be continually involved in discussions right from the day that the ED is appointed playing out what if scenarios This can include establishing which back up plans are needed They should involve the ED in the conversation since it is his her job to manage the organization This will mitigate risks and cultivate an open atmosphere Succession Planning What do We do When The reasons for a departure could be highly varied as can the actions taken as a result of that departure We asked Don about the events that can lead up to vacancies of the ED position and how to plan and prepare for unforeseen circumstances The ED resigns This is likely the best case scenario from both a planning and a morale perspective The individual has indicated they will be moving on to another job

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/recruiting-most-senior-staff-member-when-%E2%80%9C-boss%E2%80%9D-board (2014-10-22)
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  • Research charities before you give? Of course, but do it right. | Imagine Canada
    is right in reminding Canadians that they should do their research before supporting the work of a particular charity However she is wrong when she suggests as does MoneySense that Canadians should be primarily concerned about overhead costs when choosing to give or not to give Numbers are important and they should be accessible to all but they will tell you very little about the impact of an organization which is what really should matter Just looking at overhead costs is a simplistic approach to an often complex situation Imagine Canada s position statement underscores the fact that charity ranking systems are not only unhelpful but can also be misleading Before giving Canadians should actually assess whether the charity has the ability and the tools to do the work effectively Research increasingly shows that organizations that do not spend enough on their infrastructure have very little impact on the ground Good governance strong management systems program evaluation and measurement are all examples of investments that charities need to make in order to be effective This does not mean that transparency about expenses is not important It is Indeed two years ago Imagine Canada in partnership with the Canada Revenue Agency

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/research-charities-you-give-course-do-it-right (2014-10-22)
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  • Confidence of charity leaders returns amid increase in financial pressures | Imagine Canada
    recent edition of the Sector Monitor indicate a return of confidence among charity leaders amid the trend of continued financial pressures For complete information describing the state of the charitable and nonprofit sector please download the full report from the Sector Monitor section of the Imagine Canada website This edition of the Sector Monitor is the seventh since the program began late 2009 The goal of the program is to

    Original URL path: http://www.imaginecanada.ca/blog/confidence-charity-leaders-returns-amid-increase-financial-pressures (2014-10-22)
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