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  • Paulo Freire « Liam McHugh-Russell
    have knowledge to share that education should aim to combine that knowledge in a mutual learning process Fine but if I want to learn Portoguese then its likely that I am going to find a teacher who has more relevant knowledge than I do His criticism also has an implication about the process of learning Education is not a mechanical process I cannot in fact put my knowledge directly into your brain techno utopian fantasy notwithstanding Rather learning is necessarily active I can tell you something say the definition of GDP but your ability to remember it will depend on what you do when I tell you on whether you are writing it down when I am talking on what you are using to write it down on how soon you return to it after first hearing it My sense is that the best way to really learn the definition of GDP is to be forced to use it in practice or to reflect on its meaning why is it defined this way Why does the result of this calculation matter What would be wrong with other calculations How else might we have tried to capture this information How do we measure this aggregate in practice I would argue even further that the definition of GDP only becomes useful once a person can provide answers to these questions Memorizing the definition might get you marks on a test only your ability to think about it in context will make you a better economist Telling someone how a process or technique is supposed to aid their learning treats becoming a better learner meta learning as a passive rather than an active process Learning itself is a skill and like all skills it is only sharpened and refined through practice Telling students

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/paulo-freire/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Demystifying “Digital Literacy” « Liam McHugh-Russell
    Tom Pynchon and Michael Ritchie s film The Candidate Of course attacking the content of critique and analysis in the undergraduate classroom is of course somewhat beside the point Luckily at the end of her post Heffernan gets back on point suggesting that higher education should be tied into the task of improving not deriding digital literacy What my friend s research highlights is that this is not simply a matter of insufficient room for collaboration web accountability or multimedia savvy instead improving learning outcomes may be simply a matter of designing assignments which allow students to write in a register which seems and is relevant like writing a blog post August 12th 2011 Tags blogs Cathy Davidson digital literacy education higher education learning technology Virginia Heffernan writing Category culture education 1 comment to Demystifying Digital Literacy Everett Wilson eawilsonca August 17 2011 at 6 42 pm Reply Great post Liam Perhaps you ve already read The Elusive Big Idea http nyti ms qhON3m which appeared in last weekend s NY Times It is a lament and a diatribe about the decline of the thinker and the rise of the information junkie in an increasingly post idea and post Enlightenment world where our capacity for rational thought has allegedly diminished despite all of our technological advances Neal Gabler contends that information itself might be partially to blame It may seem counterintuitive that at a time when we know more than we have ever known we think about it less He remains skeptical about the possibilities afforded by social media and the Internet They are part of the problem While the online world excels at facilitating countless micro discussions and exchanges on almost every conceivable topic this hyperactive space tends to crowd out avenues for the slow churning of grand arguments

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/2011/08/12/demistifying-digital-literacy/ (2016-05-01)
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  • higher education « Liam McHugh-Russell
    That finding has now been quoted hundreds of times by bloggers some presumably delighted that their particular medium often the target of neo luddite laments regarding the prospects for digital age literacy shows real promise as a mode of written communication at least it should be noted among engaged top tier undergrads The implications are more complex A friend now completing her PhD in rhetoric at the University of Waterloo had intended to investigate the process by which students learn academic practices related to the use of sources Yet one of the key lessons of her research is just how poorly most undergraduate assignments are designed At best such assignments generally in the form of the poorly defined review paper require students to practice skills which will be useful to them neither in the real world nor in the academic practice of the professor who is teaching the class At first Heffernan uses these and other results drawn from Davidson s book to take somewhat arbitrary potshots at Tom Pynchon and Michael Ritchie s film The Candidate Of course attacking the content of critique and analysis in the undergraduate classroom is of course somewhat beside the point Luckily at the end of her post Heffernan gets back on point suggesting that higher education should be tied into the task of improving not deriding digital literacy What my friend s research highlights is that this is not simply a matter of insufficient room for collaboration web accountability or multimedia savvy instead improving learning outcomes may be simply a matter of designing assignments which allow students to write in a register which seems and is relevant like writing a blog post August 12th 2011 Tags blogs Cathy Davidson digital literacy education higher education learning technology Virginia Heffernan writing Category culture education One

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/higher-education/ (2016-05-01)
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  • technology « Liam McHugh-Russell
    That finding has now been quoted hundreds of times by bloggers some presumably delighted that their particular medium often the target of neo luddite laments regarding the prospects for digital age literacy shows real promise as a mode of written communication at least it should be noted among engaged top tier undergrads The implications are more complex A friend now completing her PhD in rhetoric at the University of Waterloo had intended to investigate the process by which students learn academic practices related to the use of sources Yet one of the key lessons of her research is just how poorly most undergraduate assignments are designed At best such assignments generally in the form of the poorly defined review paper require students to practice skills which will be useful to them neither in the real world nor in the academic practice of the professor who is teaching the class At first Heffernan uses these and other results drawn from Davidson s book to take somewhat arbitrary potshots at Tom Pynchon and Michael Ritchie s film The Candidate Of course attacking the content of critique and analysis in the undergraduate classroom is of course somewhat beside the point Luckily at the end of her post Heffernan gets back on point suggesting that higher education should be tied into the task of improving not deriding digital literacy What my friend s research highlights is that this is not simply a matter of insufficient room for collaboration web accountability or multimedia savvy instead improving learning outcomes may be simply a matter of designing assignments which allow students to write in a register which seems and is relevant like writing a blog post August 12th 2011 Tags blogs Cathy Davidson digital literacy education higher education learning technology Virginia Heffernan writing Category culture education One

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/technology/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Virginia Heffernan « Liam McHugh-Russell
    That finding has now been quoted hundreds of times by bloggers some presumably delighted that their particular medium often the target of neo luddite laments regarding the prospects for digital age literacy shows real promise as a mode of written communication at least it should be noted among engaged top tier undergrads The implications are more complex A friend now completing her PhD in rhetoric at the University of Waterloo had intended to investigate the process by which students learn academic practices related to the use of sources Yet one of the key lessons of her research is just how poorly most undergraduate assignments are designed At best such assignments generally in the form of the poorly defined review paper require students to practice skills which will be useful to them neither in the real world nor in the academic practice of the professor who is teaching the class At first Heffernan uses these and other results drawn from Davidson s book to take somewhat arbitrary potshots at Tom Pynchon and Michael Ritchie s film The Candidate Of course attacking the content of critique and analysis in the undergraduate classroom is of course somewhat beside the point Luckily at the end of her post Heffernan gets back on point suggesting that higher education should be tied into the task of improving not deriding digital literacy What my friend s research highlights is that this is not simply a matter of insufficient room for collaboration web accountability or multimedia savvy instead improving learning outcomes may be simply a matter of designing assignments which allow students to write in a register which seems and is relevant like writing a blog post August 12th 2011 Tags blogs Cathy Davidson digital literacy education higher education learning technology Virginia Heffernan writing Category culture education One

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/virginia-heffernan/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Hic Sunt Rhodus « Liam McHugh-Russell
    we march dead words into dead order The book a burial ground This worry that living words may do our bidding but seldom will remain We bide them and they may abide but their abiding may not stay Only dead words will abide in time So we know what it must be to say to say we muster words then murdered lest they lay unstill We learn too to read dead words and reach toward those words alive And having reached alive to rewrite them dead After all in all we hope our words will sing in order To set our world to order we order dead words march and hope the order sings That the order of our dead words will enter mouths and live long known and lasting still That the world of our words now dead to do our bidding will abide in wide time among living mouths A zombie song dead words alive What is known is well known only when it lays abiding The bird is only sleeping we may not say The academic bird no bird at all no owl Neither flying nor speaking but lasting known The owl that wants to speak but finds it is not yet dusk We want to write to make thoughts fly birds sing Yet we lay upon a wire narrow Is this knowing saying speaking Must even thirteen birds black to be seen also lie so marched so ordered How can the living dead sing What dance of birds abiding At what place of dusk And when September 24th 2015 Category culture Leave a Reply Cancel reply Name required Email will not be published required Website You can use these HTML tags a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/2015/09/24/hic-sunt-rhodus/ (2016-05-01)
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  • And now a rant from our sponsor « Liam McHugh-Russell
    sociological insight for a psychological one and reduces the profound premise of existentialism we always have the freedom to act even when there are consequences to a patently false pretense of self help you can do anything if you set your mind to it Anyway in the result positivity became associated with happiness and success and good tidings and negativity with the sense of inviting their opposites Of course this is doubly unfortunate not only because it universalizes a misreading of positive that makes both references to positive law and positive social science nigh incomprehensible to anyone who lives outside the university but stupid also because to negate something need not mean replacing a thing with its opposite it simply implies putting something else in its place Thus ideally the negative encompasses that part of thought and practice that goes beyond the imagining of what if things were such and such a way to the more practical fraught task of thinking what if the nominally existent was replaced with something else or the even more charged practice of demanding this nominally existent thing should be replaced with another To negate is simply to deny to say no to the merely existent The critic is not the cynic but literally one that judges a person not only capable of saying both yes and no but also of stopping to say are you sure and especially am I There is something sick I think about cultural practices rooted in the belief that problems can be solved simply by saying yes to any idea new or old so long as it is well packaged and expressed with enthusiasm or certainty I suppose compared to the dominant strand of the American zeitgeist that a country willing to raise a quizzical eyebrow pause before jumping onto the wagon of every fad that bristles with enthusiasm and reject the magical thinking of by believing it we can make it so will look like an elephant graveyard of nay saying Eeyores But nothing could be further from the truth For inasmuch as the Russian stereotype of fatalism is anything more than a stereotype it has nothing to do with being critical and has everything in common with the eager beaver American disease whereas in the lands of Slavic stereotype there is an almost overweening willingness to say yes to everything that already is no matter how bad and no to any idea about how things might be better in the always on digital Manhattan of Twitter Entertainment Tonight and BuzzFeed the almost laughable but ultimately tragic logic of the TEDtalk circuit doles out gold stars to every nincompoop self deluded enough to stand in front a crowd and expound breathlessly on an idea that promises everything everything and at almost no cost What I am getting at here is of course being critical is a constructive disposition and even a positive one but just not in the insane sense in which that word is batted around the

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/2015/03/26/and-now-a-rant-from-our-sponsor/ (2016-05-01)
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  • critique « Liam McHugh-Russell
    belief is the very substance of our social world but shit like The Gift mistakes a sociological insight for a psychological one and reduces the profound premise of existentialism we always have the freedom to act even when there are consequences to a patently false pretense of self help you can do anything if you set your mind to it Anyway in the result positivity became associated with happiness and success and good tidings and negativity with the sense of inviting their opposites Of course this is doubly unfortunate not only because it universalizes a misreading of positive that makes both references to positive law and positive social science nigh incomprehensible to anyone who lives outside the university but stupid also because to negate something need not mean replacing a thing with its opposite it simply implies putting something else in its place Thus ideally the negative encompasses that part of thought and practice that goes beyond the imagining of what if things were such and such a way to the more practical fraught task of thinking what if the nominally existent was replaced with something else or the even more charged practice of demanding this nominally existent thing should be replaced with another To negate is simply to deny to say no to the merely existent The critic is not the cynic but literally one that judges a person not only capable of saying both yes and no but also of stopping to say are you sure and especially am I There is something sick I think about cultural practices rooted in the belief that problems can be solved simply by saying yes to any idea new or old so long as it is well packaged and expressed with enthusiasm or certainty I suppose compared to the dominant strand of the American zeitgeist that a country willing to raise a quizzical eyebrow pause before jumping onto the wagon of every fad that bristles with enthusiasm and reject the magical thinking of by believing it we can make it so will look like an elephant graveyard of nay saying Eeyores But nothing could be further from the truth For inasmuch as the Russian stereotype of fatalism is anything more than a stereotype it has nothing to do with being critical and has everything in common with the eager beaver American disease whereas in the lands of Slavic stereotype there is an almost overweening willingness to say yes to everything that already is no matter how bad and no to any idea about how things might be better in the always on digital Manhattan of Twitter Entertainment Tonight and BuzzFeed the almost laughable but ultimately tragic logic of the TEDtalk circuit doles out gold stars to every nincompoop self deluded enough to stand in front a crowd and expound breathlessly on an idea that promises everything everything and at almost no cost What I am getting at here is of course being critical is a constructive disposition and even a positive

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/critique/ (2016-05-01)
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