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  • triangles « Liam McHugh-Russell
    simultaneously boring and challenging and becomes so familiar with its exercise that both the form of the problem and the nature of the solution becomes second nature Attending to a task that is not inherently pleasant fighting off distraction overcoming the frustration that inevitably attends early efforts all these are hard but they come with a payoff Taking a low level skill from heartache to habit sets down a foundation for the pursuit of tasks that are in many cases innately more interesting e g only by learning how to write in complete grammatically correct sentences can you become capable of writing moving love letters Measure twice cut once may seem like a boring rule you have to force yourself to remember until it simply becomes automatic in the way that the carpenter does her or his job and an essential part of doing the job well It turns out moreover that the payoff is double because while overcoming frustration and boredom are hard one becomes better at them through practice Even for the rarest of geniuses the pleasures of virtuosity are built on a scaffolding of boredom self doubt and frustration not only in their own field but across a variety of repetitive basic tasks As for the triangles themselves you might strongly put forward that building up a vocabulary of mathematical fundamentals offers an opportunity for your son to become a person and to live a life that he might not otherwise consider or have access to Knowing becoming familiar with the universal relationships that govern the area and height the angles width and side lengths of every triangle means that each one takes on the gleam of an otherwise hidden meaning Perhaps he ll become the kind of person for whom those meanings and the broader network

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/triangles/ (2016-05-01)
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  • work « Liam McHugh-Russell
    simultaneously boring and challenging and becomes so familiar with its exercise that both the form of the problem and the nature of the solution becomes second nature Attending to a task that is not inherently pleasant fighting off distraction overcoming the frustration that inevitably attends early efforts all these are hard but they come with a payoff Taking a low level skill from heartache to habit sets down a foundation for the pursuit of tasks that are in many cases innately more interesting e g only by learning how to write in complete grammatically correct sentences can you become capable of writing moving love letters Measure twice cut once may seem like a boring rule you have to force yourself to remember until it simply becomes automatic in the way that the carpenter does her or his job and an essential part of doing the job well It turns out moreover that the payoff is double because while overcoming frustration and boredom are hard one becomes better at them through practice Even for the rarest of geniuses the pleasures of virtuosity are built on a scaffolding of boredom self doubt and frustration not only in their own field but across a variety of repetitive basic tasks As for the triangles themselves you might strongly put forward that building up a vocabulary of mathematical fundamentals offers an opportunity for your son to become a person and to live a life that he might not otherwise consider or have access to Knowing becoming familiar with the universal relationships that govern the area and height the angles width and side lengths of every triangle means that each one takes on the gleam of an otherwise hidden meaning Perhaps he ll become the kind of person for whom those meanings and the broader network

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/category/work/ (2016-05-01)
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  • universities (ii) « Liam McHugh-Russell
    in the world We say it should have one of the best 25 MBA schools philosophy departments in the world Quebec should want that and I think Quebec does want it These all too cute editing nonetheless provides fodder for some head scratching about a change which amounts to a complete refutation of the relationship the department has with society and with the rest of the University Why does it cost so much to educate these people when there are no lab materials no medical supplies nor specialized software needed to educate them Why should the prestige of this particular department be just as high as the university s overall reputation and not some other department Why should we care what the Financial Times has to say about the work done in this department More importantly if this program is essentially a training program for tomorrow s corporate elite then why is it offered by a university at all The purely practical answer is that students willing to pay an 8000 premium on the delivery costs of the program provde a convenient cashcow for an institution constantly facing fiscal drought To that a modest proposal the school could make even more money by simply selling degrees recognizing the excellence of those already successful in the business field in return for a hefty fee disposing of the need for a library professors or administrative staff The Globe s averaging of salaries hide the students who would have otherwise done something thoughtful something innovative something revolutionary with the education they now received Little time for that with a massive debtload to pay off In his recent book on universities Ian Angus argues that business has replaced the clergy in the tacked on gaudy addition housing the professional school wing of the universities

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/2010/06/07/universities-ii-2/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Globe and Mail « Liam McHugh-Russell
    Mr Todd says of McGill We re arguably one of the best 25 universities in the world We say it should have one of the best 25 MBA schools philosophy departments in the world Quebec should want that and I think Quebec does want it These all too cute editing nonetheless provides fodder for some head scratching about a change which amounts to a complete refutation of the relationship the department has with society and with the rest of the University Why does it cost so much to educate these people when there are no lab materials no medical supplies nor specialized software needed to educate them Why should the prestige of this particular department be just as high as the university s overall reputation and not some other department Why should we care what the Financial Times has to say about the work done in this department More importantly if this program is essentially a training program for tomorrow s corporate elite then why is it offered by a university at all The purely practical answer is that students willing to pay an 8000 premium on the delivery costs of the program provde a convenient cashcow for an institution constantly facing fiscal drought To that a modest proposal the school could make even more money by simply selling degrees recognizing the excellence of those already successful in the business field in return for a hefty fee disposing of the need for a library professors or administrative staff The Globe s averaging of salaries hide the students who would have otherwise done something thoughtful something innovative something revolutionary with the education they now received Little time for that with a massive debtload to pay off In his recent book on universities Ian Angus argues that business has replaced the clergy

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/globe-and-mail/ (2016-05-01)
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  • McGill « Liam McHugh-Russell
    Mr Todd says of McGill We re arguably one of the best 25 universities in the world We say it should have one of the best 25 MBA schools philosophy departments in the world Quebec should want that and I think Quebec does want it These all too cute editing nonetheless provides fodder for some head scratching about a change which amounts to a complete refutation of the relationship the department has with society and with the rest of the University Why does it cost so much to educate these people when there are no lab materials no medical supplies nor specialized software needed to educate them Why should the prestige of this particular department be just as high as the university s overall reputation and not some other department Why should we care what the Financial Times has to say about the work done in this department More importantly if this program is essentially a training program for tomorrow s corporate elite then why is it offered by a university at all The purely practical answer is that students willing to pay an 8000 premium on the delivery costs of the program provde a convenient cashcow for an institution constantly facing fiscal drought To that a modest proposal the school could make even more money by simply selling degrees recognizing the excellence of those already successful in the business field in return for a hefty fee disposing of the need for a library professors or administrative staff The Globe s averaging of salaries hide the students who would have otherwise done something thoughtful something innovative something revolutionary with the education they now received Little time for that with a massive debtload to pay off In his recent book on universities Ian Angus argues that business has replaced the clergy

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/mcgill/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Quebec « Liam McHugh-Russell
    Mr Todd says of McGill We re arguably one of the best 25 universities in the world We say it should have one of the best 25 MBA schools philosophy departments in the world Quebec should want that and I think Quebec does want it These all too cute editing nonetheless provides fodder for some head scratching about a change which amounts to a complete refutation of the relationship the department has with society and with the rest of the University Why does it cost so much to educate these people when there are no lab materials no medical supplies nor specialized software needed to educate them Why should the prestige of this particular department be just as high as the university s overall reputation and not some other department Why should we care what the Financial Times has to say about the work done in this department More importantly if this program is essentially a training program for tomorrow s corporate elite then why is it offered by a university at all The purely practical answer is that students willing to pay an 8000 premium on the delivery costs of the program provde a convenient cashcow for an institution constantly facing fiscal drought To that a modest proposal the school could make even more money by simply selling degrees recognizing the excellence of those already successful in the business field in return for a hefty fee disposing of the need for a library professors or administrative staff The Globe s averaging of salaries hide the students who would have otherwise done something thoughtful something innovative something revolutionary with the education they now received Little time for that with a massive debtload to pay off In his recent book on universities Ian Angus argues that business has replaced the clergy

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/quebec/ (2016-05-01)
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  • tuition fees « Liam McHugh-Russell
    Mr Todd says of McGill We re arguably one of the best 25 universities in the world We say it should have one of the best 25 MBA schools philosophy departments in the world Quebec should want that and I think Quebec does want it These all too cute editing nonetheless provides fodder for some head scratching about a change which amounts to a complete refutation of the relationship the department has with society and with the rest of the University Why does it cost so much to educate these people when there are no lab materials no medical supplies nor specialized software needed to educate them Why should the prestige of this particular department be just as high as the university s overall reputation and not some other department Why should we care what the Financial Times has to say about the work done in this department More importantly if this program is essentially a training program for tomorrow s corporate elite then why is it offered by a university at all The purely practical answer is that students willing to pay an 8000 premium on the delivery costs of the program provde a convenient cashcow for an institution constantly facing fiscal drought To that a modest proposal the school could make even more money by simply selling degrees recognizing the excellence of those already successful in the business field in return for a hefty fee disposing of the need for a library professors or administrative staff The Globe s averaging of salaries hide the students who would have otherwise done something thoughtful something innovative something revolutionary with the education they now received Little time for that with a massive debtload to pay off In his recent book on universities Ian Angus argues that business has replaced the clergy

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/tag/tuition-fees/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Canada « Liam McHugh-Russell
    Mr Todd says of McGill We re arguably one of the best 25 universities in the world We say it should have one of the best 25 MBA schools philosophy departments in the world Quebec should want that and I think Quebec does want it These all too cute editing nonetheless provides fodder for some head scratching about a change which amounts to a complete refutation of the relationship the department has with society and with the rest of the University Why does it cost so much to educate these people when there are no lab materials no medical supplies nor specialized software needed to educate them Why should the prestige of this particular department be just as high as the university s overall reputation and not some other department Why should we care what the Financial Times has to say about the work done in this department More importantly if this program is essentially a training program for tomorrow s corporate elite then why is it offered by a university at all The purely practical answer is that students willing to pay an 8000 premium on the delivery costs of the program provde a convenient cashcow for an institution constantly facing fiscal drought To that a modest proposal the school could make even more money by simply selling degrees recognizing the excellence of those already successful in the business field in return for a hefty fee disposing of the need for a library professors or administrative staff The Globe s averaging of salaries hide the students who would have otherwise done something thoughtful something innovative something revolutionary with the education they now received Little time for that with a massive debtload to pay off In his recent book on universities Ian Angus argues that business has replaced the clergy

    Original URL path: http://Mchugh-Russell.ca/category/canada/ (2016-05-01)
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