archive-ca.com » CA » N » NATURE.CA

Total: 1034

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Zoology Collections | Canadian Museum of Nature
    25 000 lots mostly from Canada including the Arctic regions Molluscs The museum s Mollusc Collection is the largest most comprehensive collection of molluscs in Canada Our 165 000 lots are divided into three sections shell collection wet collection and cephalopod collection Overall it represents more than 350 families collected in over 12 countries and numerous oceans Crustaceans Dating back to the 1800s our Crustacean Collection contains specimens associated with the exploration and development of Canada Gammaridea Caprellidea Isopoda Hyperiidea and Mysidacea are the major groups found in the collection which totals about 117 000 lots Magnify image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Insects Our Insect Collection houses nearly one million specimens most being beetles Scarabaeidae and Curculioniodea are particularly well represented Geographic areas of representation include North Central and South America Australia and South Africa Parasites Our Parasite Collection which holds 50 000 lots contains large numbers of specimens from the Institute of Parasitology McGill University and the former Arctic Biological Station Fisheries and Oceans Canada Invertebrates The museum s General Invertebrate collection contains groups such as the cnidarians various free living helminths and non segmented worms and the echinoderms Most of our 55 000 lots of general invertebrates are from Canadian aquatic and terrestrial habitats including the Canadian Arctic Faunal Assemblage Our Faunal Assemblage Collection was established in 1982 to recognize the importance of preserving orphaned collections of unsorted plankton and benthos At present the collection contains 200 000 lots with at least 2 5 million unidentified specimens Vertebrate Collections The Canadian Museum of Nature s Vertebrate Collections include fish amphibians and reptiles birds mammals and an osteological reference collection Curator Kamal Khidas Magnify image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Fish Our Fish Collection contains about 60 000 lots of fluid preserved specimens 1000 lots of cleared and stained specimens and about 500 lots of fish skeletons and otoliths We have about 1740 type specimens that are mainly paratypes We have a good representation of freshwater and marine species predominately from North American high latitudes The museum holds the best Canadian Arctic and lamprey collection in the world Amphibians and Reptiles Our Amphibian and Reptile Collection contains about 37 000 lots most of which are fluid preserved with some skeletons skins and mounted specimens It also boasts a very good collection of dried frog skins mounted on sheets of paper like plants they offer a very good source of tissue for DNA extraction Our emphasis is on geographic and life history variation of common species in Canada Approximately 89 of the collection comprises Canadian specimens This collection counts representatives from 972 species 379 amphibians 593 reptiles in 63 families One hundred and thirty seven are type specimens including two holotypes among which one is a Canadian holotype and five are Canadian paratypes Birds Our extensive Bird Collection comprises study skins mounted specimens skeletons nests eggs and some fluid preserved specimens In all there are approximately 125 000 specimens

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/collections/animals (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Palaeobiology Collections | Canadian Museum of Nature
    this fossil find on Ellesmere Island by researcher Natalia Rybczynski Home Research Collections Collections Palaeobiology Collections View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Palaeobiology Collections Fossils Curator Kieran Shepherd Magnify image View copyright information Anne Botman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Vertebrates Our Vertebrate Fossil Collection contains more than 50 000 specimens and includes a broad range of fauna from the Devonian to the Pleistocene The following are well represented in the collection Cretaceous reptiles including an impressive dinosaur collection Neogene mammals Cretaceous and Devonian fishes Of particular note are our dinosaurs from the late Cretaceous especially hadrosaurs and ceratopsians The museum s Quaternary mammals collected in northern Canada constitute the finest and most comprehensive collection of its type Plants Our Fossil Plant Collection is a small but important representation of Canadian flora particularly from the Cretaceous and Neogene during what was formerly known as the Tertiary Magnify image View copyright information Richard Day Canadian Museum of Nature Close A fossilized fungal spore Ctenosporites sp seen through a microscope The specimen measures 35 35 microns Fungi The Fossil Fungi Collection of 1200 specimens is primarily a reference collection of spores mounted on slides Pollen Our Fossil Pollen Collection consists of 18 000 fossil pollen and spore specimens and modern reference specimens It is the finest collection of its kind in Canada Curation Curation of a collection of specimens whose sizes range from so small they require a scanning electron microscope to view to so large and heavy they require industrial racking for storage and forklifts to move can be a challenge The museum s palaeobiology collections are stored in environmentally controlled rooms in either metal cabinets or on racks A variety of specialized supports were constructed to suit each and every specimen All storage material that will

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/collections/fossils (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Geological Collections | Canadian Museum of Nature
    form the foundation for their research projects Contact Scott Ercit Minerals The Mineral Collection is an extensive collection of minerals from Canada and from around the world and is heavily used by the research community The collection was enhanced with the addition of the William Pinch collection and is visited regularly by professionals and amateurs studying Canadian minerals Contained within this collection are about 5000 radioactive specimens safely housed in a specially designed vault and may be the finest collection of radioactives in the world Rocks The Rock Collection is a small assemblage of rocks from around the world and is used primarily for display purposes The samples illustrate the three main rock types igneous sedimentary and metamorphic Gems The Gem Collection consists of 2000 specimens and contains a wonderful collection of faceted stones cabochons and carvings primarily from Canada Many represent unconventional mineral species or complex cutting styles A number of these were donated by Canadians to enhance the National Collection The G G Waite subcollection is an important cornerstone of the gem collection Magnify image View copyright information Michael Bainbridge Michael Bainbridge Close Zoisite variety tanzanite from Arusha Tanzania 3 cm 2 cm 1 5 cm Collection CMNMC 56797 Pinch Collection Mineral Occurrences The Mineral Occurrence Collection represents comprehensive suites of samples from important mines and mineral deposits primarily in Canada The specimens are mostly research grade material and are ultimately intended for use by future researchers at points in time when those sites are eventually closed or become otherwise inaccessible Curation Curation of a collection of specimens whose sizes range from so small they require a scanning electron microscope to view to so large and heavy they require industrial racking for storage and forklifts to move can be a challenge The museum s geological collections are stored

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/collections/minerals (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive



  • Botany Collections | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Canadian Museum of Nature Close A Brief Herbarium History The National Herbarium of Canada at the Canadian Museum of Nature was created when the plant collections of the Geological and Natural History Survey of Canada were officially incorporated into a museum department in 1882 At that time John Macoun was hired as the museum s first biologist his primary interest was botany Macoun built up a sizable collection of approximately 100 000 plants including photosynthetic protists and lichens known as a herbarium before his semi retirement in 1911 As a result of Macoun s collecting and trading endeavours and of government supported Canadian exploration the museum s plant collections are rich in historic specimens dating back to 1766 A E Porsild was hired as the museum s botanist in 1936 and with his specific interest in Arctic botany he developed the Canadian National Herbarium into a world class Arctic plant collection that today holds more than 100 000 Arctic plant specimens Today the museum s four plant collections vascular plants bryophytes lichens and algae together contain well over one million plant specimens comprising one of Canada s largest plant collections Curator Jennifer Doubt The Collections The four collections of the National Herbarium of Canada are each considered to be a national collection for its discipline each with a unique international code View copyright information Canadian Museum of Nature Close Algae Our Algae Collection CANA consists of over 95 000 samples or lots that contain an estimated 350 000 specimens About 300 are type specimens The collection also includes a complete set of the Phycotheca Boreali Americana exsiccata Diatoms comprise about two thirds of the collection although specimens representing all algal types are present Search the phycology collection specimen database Lichens and Allied Fungi Our Lichen Collection CANL represents the largest collection of Canadian lichens in the world and the foundation for Irwin Brodo s ground breaking resource The Lichens of North America The collection currently contains 150 000 catalogued specimens including about 750 type specimens The collection also includes many exsiccata sets Lichens lichenized fungi and allied fungi including those growing on lichens lichenicolous fungi are the only fungal specimens at CANL The Canadian National Mycological Herbarium DAOM at Agriculture and Agrifood Canada curates non lichenized fungi Bryophytes Our Bryophyte Collection CANM contains 250 000 specimen of mosses liverworts and hornworts including about 950 type specimens Prolific work by Robert Ireland Moss Flora of the Maritime Provinces who built the collection through research and curatorship is represented here The collection is also known for unique historical specimens Vascular Plants Our Vascular Plant Collection CAN offers an excellent representation of native species from north temperate regions with a strong emphasis on Canadian species There are about 600 000 specimens including about 2500 type specimens Arctic botany has always been a key strength of the collection alongside the evolving taxonomic interests represented in our research staff currently willows grasses sedges legumes and spurges Magnify image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/collections/plants-algae (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Our Research and Collections Facility | Canadian Museum of Nature
    of the building includes many innovative features such as a quarantine area with walk in freezers for control of pest organisms as well as a suite of laboratories to conduct state of the art scientific research on animal fossil mineral and plant materials The museum chose to consolidate resources previously dispersed among several older buildings in the National Capital Region By bringing together staff and resources into one centralized location the museum is more efficient and focused The Natural Heritage Campus provides a superior work environment for scientific studies collection curation and development of new exhibitions Preservation The 20 478 square metre building offers workspace configuration and security features to protect the collections from both human and natural hazards The collection area has three large environmentally controlled components or pods that house 42 individual collection rooms and nine documentation rooms The size of this area is equivalent to approximately one and a half football fields The building also includes specially equipped laboratories for the identification and preservation of specimens that are dry or stored in fluids Prior to moving to the Natural History Campus staff undertook the enormous effort of reorganizing the museum s vast specimen collections Nearly 1000 new cabinets were added to replace old substandard cabinets and increase the amount of available storage space to avoid the overcrowding of specimens More cabinets are added each year to accommodate the growing collections and the collection storage area currently holds more than 3000 cabinets custom designed to improve organization and access Magnify Image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Sustainable Solutions The facility is designed to meet the preservation needs of the various collections while aiming to meet environmental sustainability targets by grouping individual collections according to their degree of susceptibility to environmental factors and pests

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/about-us/history-buildings/our-research-facility (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Past Research Projects | Canadian Museum of Nature
    News Media Event Planners Tour Trade Plan Your Visit Hours Admission Directions Exhibitions What s On Floor Plan Services Groups Explore Nature Mobile Apps Our Websites about Nature Blogs Videos and More Research Collections Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications About Us Support the Museum Products and Services Careers and Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Past Research Projects Past Research Projects Our science experts conduct collection based research with a broad range of collaborators The following projects recall the work we have done in past years Projects by Category Plants and Algae Flora of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago Project info Connect with Us Facebook Twitter WordPress YouTube RSS Email Canadian Museum of Nature Exploring our natural future Hours Admission Directions Our Exhibitions What s On Membership Group Visits Teacher Zone Mobile Apps Blogs Videos More Our Websites about Nature Collections Online Collection Data Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Donors and Sponsors Facility Rentals Birthday Parties Travelling Exhibition Rentals Careers Volunteering Museum

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/past-research-projects (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Change in Benthic Communities: Human and Natural Effects | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Communities View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Change in Benthic Communities Human and Natural Effects Magnify image View copyright information Andrew Thurber Canadian Museum of Nature Close Kathy Conlan preparing for a dive with the help of Stacy Kim Cape Chocolate McMurdo Sound Antarctica This multidisciplinary activity involves many collaborators from around the world It investigates the change in benthic bottom dwelling communities of animals in polar and other low temperature aquatic environments These results help understand the diversity and dynamics of benthic marine life and help predict responses to factors such as climate warming introduction of contaminants and the impacts of fishing practices Principal investigator Kathy Conlan Additional Resources Australian canyon study Shirley Sorokin South Australian Research and Development Institute http www sardi sa gov au staff profiles aquatic environment marine environment and ecology shirley sorokin Australian crustacean time series study Sabine Dittmann Flinders University http www flinders edu au people sabine dittmann Beaufort Sea research Steve Blasco Geological Survey of Canada https www nrcan gc ca trailblazers steve blasco 3477 Alec Aitken University of Saskatchewan http artsandscience usask ca profile AAitken Antarctic research Stacy Kim Moss Landing Marine Laboratories California State University http www mlml calstate edu faculty stacy kim In the Museum s Blog Studying the Enriching Effect of Submarine Canyons Marine biologist Kathy Conlan and her team found 531 species of worms shrimps starfishes and more in underwater canyons off Australia This research helps us understand the importance of such canyons to marine life Species Discoveries in 2014 at the Canadian Museum of Nature Discovery of new species is a specialty of the museum s scientific research and a bumper crop was named and classified in 2014 Continue reading Project Collaborators Kathleen E Conlan Ph D Research Scientist and Section Head Zoology

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/change-benthic-communities-human-natural-effects (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ecology and Taxonomy of Northwest Atlantic Marine Species | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications About Us Support the Museum Products and Services Careers and Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Ecology and Taxonomy of Northwest Atlantic Marine Species View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Ecology and Taxonomy of Northwest Atlantic Marine Species Magnify image View copyright information Jean Marc Gagnon Canadian Museum of Nature Close This research examines aspects relating to the taxonomy ecology and biogeography of invertebrate species found in the Northwest Atlantic The work will compare morphological and genetic variability in populations of Lady Crabs Giant File Clams and scavenging amphipods along the east coast of North America and the Canadian Arctic and will also investigate the functional morphology of a deep water burrowing Heart Urchin in the St Lawrence Estuary Principal investigator Jean Marc Gagnon Additional Resources The Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections http www spnhc org In the Museum s Blog Why should we get excited about one new species in the ocean Why should we get excited about one new species in the ocean Read more about a giant file clam which now has a new identity Continue reading So when do you know you ve discovered a new species When do you know you ve discovered a new species Read part 1 of the story of a giant file clam found 30 years ago Continue reading Project Collaborators Jean Marc Gagnon Ph D Curator Invertebrates Zoology Specialty Marine biology Connect with Us Facebook Twitter WordPress YouTube RSS Email Canadian Museum of Nature Exploring our natural future Hours Admission Directions Our Exhibitions What

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/ecology-taxonomy-northwest-atlantic-marine-species (2016-02-07)
    Open archived version from archive



  •