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  • Freshwater Mussels and Marine Mussels of Canada: Studies on Taxonomy, Distribution and Conservation | Canadian Museum of Nature
    wide open here as the animal pumps and filters the cold oxygen rich water of the river Locality Rivière du Gouffre near Saint Urbain Charlevoix region Quebec A part of this research program is on a species rich yet declining group of freshwater mussels native to Canada the Unionacea These animals occur in lakes and rivers and are good indicators of ecological health The work focuses on taxonomy by using shell morphology from early life stages and considers distribution and changes to populations of these native mussels Assessments include the impact of human activities including the introductions of invasive species such as the zebra mussel The other aspects of this project focus on the taxonomy of marine mussels the Mytilidae found along Canada s Pacific and Atlantic coasts using early life stages for species identification and the importance of these mussels in coastal ecosystems Principal investigator André Martel Additional Resources Nathalie Desrosiers and Annie Paquet Ministère du Développement Durable de l Environnement de la Faune et des Parcs du Québec website in French http www mddefp gouv qc ca faune inter htm Tania Baker Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources OMNR Pembroke Ontario http www mnr gov on ca en Meredith Brown Ottawa River Keeper ORK Ottawa Ontario http ottawariverkeeper ca index html Dr Don McAlpine New Brunswick Museum St John New Brunswick http www nbm mnb ca Dr David Zanatta Central Michigan University Mount Pleasant Michigan https www cmich edu colleges cst biology Pages default aspx Dr Réjean Tremblay Institut des Sciences de la mer ISMER Université du Québec à Rimouski Rimouski Quebec http www uqar ca english Dr Denis Lacelle University of Ottawa Ottawa Ontario http www uottawa ca en In the Museum s Blog The Rare Hickorynut Freshwater Mussel Finds a Haven in the Ottawa River Researcher André

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/freshwater-mussels-marine-mussels-canada-studies-taxonomy-dis (2016-02-07)
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  • Lamprey Evolution | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Lamprey Evolution View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Lamprey Evolution Magnify image View copyright information Alexander M Naseka Alexander M Naseka Close Claude B Renaud electrofishing for lampreys in the Slave River at Fort Smith Northwest Territories July 2 2012 The lamprey genus Lethenteron is widely distributed across Eurasia and North America including vast regions of Canada In a recent comprehensive taxonomic study of lampreys of the world the genus was strongly identified as a distinct group using genetic tools However the evolutionary relationships of the majority of the species were difficult to understand The purpose of this collaborative study involving two Canadian and two Russian ichthyologists is to revise the genus across its range and resolve these taxonomic questions Principal investigator Claude Renaud Additional Resources Prof Richard Cloutier Université du Québec à Rimouski website in French http www uqar ca biologie professeurs cloutier richard Prof Philip A Cochran Saint Mary s University of Minnesota http www smumn edu undergraduate home areas of study biology department ltemplate faculty details lcommtypeid 25 item id 228 extPage 1 Dr Margaret F Docker University of Manitoba Winnipeg Manitoba http www umanitoba ca Biology people docker Dr Howard S Gill Murdoch University Perth Australia http www murdoch edu au Research capabilities Centre for Fish Fisheries and Aquatic Ecosystems Research Centre members Researchers and Adjuncts Howard Gill Dr Alexander M Naseka Zoological Institute Russian Academy of Sciences St Petersburg http www zin ru labs ichtlab index html html Prof Ian C Potter Murdoch University Perth Australia http profiles murdoch edu au myprofile ian potter Project Collaborators Noel Alfonso M Sc Senior Research Assistant Zoology Specialty Ichthyology Brian W

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/lamprey-evolution (2016-02-07)
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  • Morphogenetic Characteristics of Large Carnivores from Canada, and the Implications for Conservation | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Morphogenetic Characteristics of Large Carnivores from Canada and the Implications for Conservation View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Morphogenetic Characteristics of Large Carnivores from Canada and the Implications for Conservation Magnify image View copyright information Kamal Khidas Canadian Museum of Nature Close This work analyzes morphogenetic variations in populations of Canada lynx wolf brown bear and polar bear Clear definition of the morphometric and genetic characteristics of different populations will help elucidate their mechanisms of adaptation and evolution The research will also help to identify evolutionary significant units and ultimately to better understand the ecology of these species Principal investigator Kamal Khidas Additional Resources Alliance of Natural History Museums of Canada http www naturalhistorymuseums ca index e htm Canadian Society of Zoologists The Ecology Ethology and Evolution EEE section http www csz scz ca The Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections SPNHC http www spnhc org The University of Ottawa Faculties of Education and Sciences http www uottawa ca The Centre of Geographic Sciences Nova Scotia http www cogs ns ca The New Brunswick Museum http www nbm mnb ca COSEWIC Marine and Terrestrial Mammals http www cosewic gc ca eng sct5 index e cfm IUCN http www iucn org In the Museum s Blog In Search of the Elusive Canada Lynx On the go for 3000 km Follow the summer biology research trip of one of the museum s curators Continue reading Hybridization in the Living World What happens when representatives of two species mate and produce a hybrid Do the consequences threaten the parent species Mammalogist Kamal Khidas enlightens us on this issue as he did during the second NatureTalks presentation Project Collaborators Kamal Khidas Ph D Curator Vertebrates Zoology

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/morphogenetic-characteristics-large-carnivores-canada-implica (2016-02-07)
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  • Systematics, Faunistics and Conservation of Canadian Fishes | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Systematics Faunistics and Conservation of Canadian Fishes View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Systematics Faunistics and Conservation of Canadian Fishes Magnify image View copyright information Charles Douglas Canadian Museum of Nature Close The Wolffish Anarhichas orientalis This collaborative collection based activity addresses outstanding taxonomic questions in Canadian fishes based on the excellent specimens housed at the research and collections facility of the Canadian Museum of Nature and elsewhere Part of the work focuses on species of concern to the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada Other work will address the history of species distribution habitats extinction and aspects of taxonomy The results contribute to baseline data for the analyses of issues such as environmental change and conservation information is disseminated to popular and scientific audiences Principal investigator Brian Coad Additional Resources James D Reist Fisheries and Oceans Canada Arctic Fish Ecology and Assessment Research Central and Arctic Region Freshwater Institute 501 University Crescent Winnipeg Manitoba R3T 2N6 Canada http www dfo mpo gc ca Science oceanography oceanographie accasp projects detail eng asp pid 19 In the Museum s Blog Expedition to Davis Strait Rough Seas Cod Liver Sandwiches and a Highly Diverse Marine Ecosystem to Study Noel Alfonso s recent sea voyage wasn t easy but his efforts were well rewarded He reports that 71 fish specimens and 119 invertebrate specimens have enriched the museum s Arctic collections and our understanding of this environment Project Collaborators Brian W Coad Ph D Research Scientist Zoology Specialty Icthyology Noel Alfonso M Sc Senior Research Assistant Zoology Specialty Ichthyology Connect with Us

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/systematics-faunistics-conservation-canadian-fishes (2016-02-07)
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  • Taxonomy of Weevils in the Americas | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Taxonomy of Weevils in the Americas View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Taxonomy of Weevils in the Americas Magnify image View copyright information Michael Branstetter Michael Branstetter Close Winkler funnels for extracting insects under a tarpaulin in the rainforest at Cerro Saslaya in Nicaragua Within the fallen leaves of tropical forests leaf litter is a layer of concentrated arthropod biodiversity the most diverse group of animals e g insects and spiders Beetles especially weevils are prominent members Recent work Project ALAS Arthropods of La Selva has described the communities of litter weevils along the Atlantic coast of Costa Rica and Project LLAMA Leaf Litter Arthropods of MesoAmerica is focused on litter communities throughout Central America These projects have described many new species and are improving our knowledge of species distributions across many geographic features Findings show that the number of species in these habitats is greatly underestimated and many species have highly restricted distributions Another program of research focuses on the adding to and updating our knowledge of the biodiversity and systematics of North American weevils Principal investigator Bob Anderson Additional Resources Leaf Litter Arthropods of MesoAmerica LLAMA https sites google com site longinollama In the Museum s Blog Fieldwork Matters Entomologist Bob Anderson is back from his fifth weevil collecting trip in Guatemala with some new species discoveries Continue reading Species Discoveries in 2014 at the Canadian Museum of Nature Discovery of new species is a specialty of the museum s scientific research and a bumper crop was named and classified in 2014 Continue reading Project Collaborators Robert S Anderson Ph D Research Scientist Zoology Specialty Entomology François

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/taxonomy-weevils-americas (2016-02-07)
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  • Changes in Vertebrate Fauna during Global Transitions | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Navigation Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Changes in Vertebrate Fauna during Global Transitions View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Changes in Vertebrate Fauna during Global Transitions Magnify image View copyright information Chun Li Chun Li Close Xiao Chun Wu studying a marine archosauriform from the Middle Triassic of China in the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology IVPP Beijing China This research is about vertebrate species from two key extinctions the Cretaceous Tertiary K T about 65 million years ago and the Triassic Jurassic Tr J about 210 million years ago Studies in southern Alberta and south western China are adding to our understanding of the diversity and number of dinosaurs and other vertebrate fossils after Tr J boundary and before the K T extinction The work contributes to our knowledge of the origin and evolution of species of dinosaurs turtles ichthyosaurs plesiosaurs and others It also helps to understand the extent of the biological and environmental changes globally Principal investigator Xiao chun Wu Additional Resources Dr Chun Li http english ivpp cas cn Dr T Sato http www u gakugei ac jp english Dr Yen nien Cheng http www nmns edu tw index eng html Dr Li jun Zhao http english zmnh com Drs Donald B Brinkman and David Eberth http www tyrrellmuseum com Society of Vertebrate Paleontology http vertpaleo org In the Museum s Blog Species Discoveries in 2014 at the Canadian Museum of Nature Discovery of new species is a specialty of the museum s scientific research and a bumper crop was named and classified in 2014 Continue reading Project Collaborators Xiao chun Wu Ph D Research Scientist Palaeobiology Specialty

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/changes-vertebrate-fauna-during-global-transitions (2016-02-07)
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  • Changing Faunas and Human Activities on the Canadian Northwest Coast for the Past 6000 Years | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Buildings Skip Navigation Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Centre Arctic Knowledge and Exploration Centre Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects Home Research Collections Research Projects Changing Faunas and Human Activities on the Canadian Northwest Coast for the Past 6000 Years View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Changing Faunas and Human Activities on the Canadian Northwest Coast for the Past 6000 Years Magnify image View copyright information Kathy Stewart Kathy Stewart Close Kathy Stewart Fieldwork Lothagam Kenya Four prehistoric sites from Prince Rupert Harbour British Columbia were excavated by a multidisciplinary team funded by a grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council This study along with a study of faunas from Vancouver Island compares changes in the composition and distribution of vertebrate species the environment and human subsistence between northern and southern coastal British Columbia Stewart analyzed and interpreted changes in the animal remains mostly mammals and fish in the context of environmental change and human activities Principal investigator Kathy Stewart Additional Resources Canadian Zooarchaeology nature ca en research collections scientific services canadian zooarchaeology Project Collaborators Kathlyn M Stewart Ph D Research Scientist and Section Head Palaeobiology Specialty Zooarchaeology

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/changing-faunas-human-activities-canadian-northwest-coast-pas (2016-02-07)
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  • Mammal Evolution and Climate Change in the High Arctic during the Neogene Period | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Species Discovery and Change Past Research Projects High Arctic Camel Amazing Discovery Learn about this fossil find on Ellesmere Island by researcher Natalia Rybczynski Home Research Collections Research Projects Mammal Evolution and Climate Change in the High Arctic during the Neogene Period View copyright information Paul Sokoloff Canadian Museum of Nature Close Mammal Evolution and Climate Change in the High Arctic during the Neogene Period Magnify image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Rybczynski Devon Island 2008 Discovery of the brain case of Puijila About 55 million years ago Earth was extremely warm so much so that alligators could live in the High Arctic Since that time the planet has been generally cooling culminating with the onset of the Ice Age about 3 million years ago This research focuses on terrestrial fossil deposits from the Neogene 23 to 3 million years ago of the High Arctic Our efforts are uncovering the evolutionary history of vertebrate lineages using fossil and modern evidence Through our many collaborations we incorporate a wide range of expertise to answer questions related to ecosystem landscape and climate change in the High Arctic Principal investigator Natalia Rybczynski Additional Resources Polar Continental Shelf Program http www nrcan gc ca the north polar continental shelf program polar shelf 10003 The W Garfield Weston Foundation http www westonfoundation org Pages default aspx Dalhousie Geochronology Centre http geochronology earthsciences dal ca Mary Dawson Carnegie Museum of Natural History http www carnegiemnh org science default aspx id 1864 In the Museum s Blog The Brock Award for 2013 The Canadian Museum of Nature has a long history of research with expertise and leadership in species discovery and work in the Arctic We continually produce new knowledge that is published in the scientific literature Project Collaborators Natalia Rybczynski Ph

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/research-projects/mammal-evolution-climate-change-high-arctic-during-neogene-pe (2016-02-07)
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