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  • Volunteering: Other Opportunities | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Careers Volunteering School Workshops Educational Programmes Youth Opportunities Research Opportunities Other Opportunities Home About Us Careers and Volunteering Volunteering Other Opportunities View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Other Opportunities Volunteering The Canadian Museum of Nature has a variety of interesting behind the scenes volunteer opportunities These are most often available in our research and collections facility and occasionally in the museum Position Duties Could include preparing material for group mail outs photographing or scanning material and or manipulating and organizing digital images preparing information kits organizing files and other office related tasks inventory material and enter records into a database a At Our Research and Collections Facility Time of year Depends on the project Schedule options Monday to Friday Often half a day or one full day per week Location Our research and collections facility 1740 Pink Road Gatineau Quebec Directions 868 Kb PDF b At the Museum Commitment duration Depends on the project Schedule options Variable Often half a day or one full day per week Location The museum 240 McLeod Street Ottawa Ontario Directions Contact Us Katja Rodriguez Coordinator Volunteer Programme Tel 613 566 4261

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/about-us/careers-volunteering/volunteering/other-opportunities (2016-02-07)
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  • Links to Other Sites | Canadian Museum of Nature
    and Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Terms and Conditions Copyright Privacy Notice Assistive Technology Links to Other Sites Home Terms and Conditions Links to Other Sites View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Links to Other Sites The Canadian Museum of Nature links to the web sites of third parties including selected sponsors donors partners associations social media information resources and others These links are provided as a convenience and for information purposes only The museum has no control over makes no representation or warranty and bears no responsibility for the accuracy legality or content of the third party web sites The information offered may be available only in the language s used by the sites in question The web sites may not be accessible to persons with disabilities Use of Social Media The museum s use of social media serves as an extension of its presence on the web Social media account s are public and are not hosted on Canadian Museum of Nature servers Users who choose to interact with us via social media should read the terms of service and privacy policies of these third party service providers and those of any applications used to access them How we protect your privacy Our decision to follow favourite or subscribe to a social media account does not imply an endorsement of that account channel page or site and neither does sharing re tweeting reposting or linking to content from another user Because the servers of social media platforms are managed by a third party our social media accounts are subject to downtime that may be out of our control As such we accept no responsibility for platforms becoming unresponsive or unavailable Connect with Us Facebook Twitter WordPress YouTube RSS

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/links-other-sites (2016-02-07)
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  • Marine Creatures—Fossil Gallery | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Canadian Museum of Nature Close Part of North America was covered by the Western Interior Seaway 60 to 100 million years ago The Western Interior Seaway bisected North America from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico during the Late Cretaceous Period In Canada almost all of Manitoba and Saskatchewan and large parts of Alberta and the Northwest Territories were under water at that time At its deepest the seaway was 300 m etres deep and as much as 1600 kilometres wide Strange prehistoric beasts swam this ancient sea and coexisted with dinosaurs The Prairies were once teeming with crocodiles sharks and other fish birds with teeth and all sorts of other delightfully frightening creatures The Talisman Energy Fossil Gallery showcases many marine species from this place and period The Imperial Oil Foundation sponsored the gallery s marine Cretaceous section which profiles sea life of 85 to 65 million years ago Sea Monsters Magnify Image View copyright information Polygone Studio Canadian Museum of Nature Close An elasmosaurid a plesiosaur Visitors to the gallery will be awed by skeletons looming overhead a plesiosaur and a mosasaur two predatory reptiles that dominated the seaway s waters Some argue that the fabled Loch Ness monster is a living example of a plesiosaur with its long flexible neck Other plesiosaurs had short necks and large heads and many reached 14 metres long The plesiosaur on display is from the family Elasmosauridae The specimen is a cast of the real fossilized skeleton which was found on Vancouver Island British Columbia Magnify Image View copyright information Polygone Studio Canadian Museum of Nature Close Hesperornis gracilis The mosasaur was another marine giant The largest one could swallow a variety of prey with its gaping one metre jaw It dined on fish turtles birds sharks and even other mosasaurs The Komodo dragon found today in Indonesia is distantly related to this marine predator of long ago Kourisodon puntledgensis is the species of mosasaur that floats overhead in the gallery At four metres long it is actually considered small in comparison with its more fearsome cousins The species is new to science it was identified in only 2002 The specimen on display is a cast The fossil was also found on Vancouver Island British Columbia A panel mount contains the fossil skeleton of an even larger mosasaur Platecarpus coryphaeus This specimen was collected in Kansas in the early 1900s by George F Sternberg who was a member of a renowned family of palaeontologists including his father Charles H Sternberg The Platecarpus is between 7 m and 8 m in length Giant Turtles Another amazing find is the largest turtle that ever lived Archelon ischyros This animal was about the size of a small car Visitors to the gallery will see a cast of the largest known and best preserved specimen which was discovered in South Dakota The animal s carapace the bony upper part of its shell was not solid but rather a series of rib like struts

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/plan-your-visit/what-see-do/our-exhibitions/fossil-gallery/marine-creatures (2016-02-07)
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  • Cast of Characters—Fossil Gallery | Canadian Museum of Nature
    The skeleton on exhibition was found in 1921 by Charles M Sternberg son of the renowned palaeontologist Charles H Sternberg It was originally identified as belonging to a species of Gorgosaurus but further study in the 1960s at the Canadian Museum of Nature determined that it was a new genus and species The specimen in the gallery is the holotype which is the reference specimen for assigning others to that species First of Its Kind View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Vagaceratops irvinensis was collected in 1958 but wasn t removed from its plaster field jacket until 40 years later Only then did palaeontologists at the Canadian Museum of Nature realize that it was a new species Read the Amazing Story of the discovery The specimen in the gallery is the holotype of that species The dinosaur lived about 72 million years ago Killer of the Seas View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Platecarpus coryphaeus is a mosasaur that was collected in Kansas in the early 1900s by George F Sternberg In the gallery the panel mounted specimen is between 7 m and 8 m long This marine reptile lived 88 to 85 million years ago The Largest Turtle Ever View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Archelon ischyros was the largest turtle that ever lived about the size of a Volkswagen Beetle The cast on display represents the largest known best preserved specimen it was discovered in South Dakota The animal lived about 74 million years ago The Earliest Known Whale View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Pakicetus attocki lived about 50 million years ago It probably spent more time on land than in the water but it is an important link in the

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/plan-your-visit/what-see-do/our-exhibitions/fossil-gallery/cast-characters (2016-02-07)
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  • 360° Gallery Tour of the Talisman Energy Fossil Gallery | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Navigation Information for Families Teachers News Media Event Planners Tour Trade Plan Your Visit Hours Admission Directions Exhibitions What s On Floor Plan Services Groups Explore Nature Mobile Apps Our Websites about Nature Blogs Videos and More Research Collections Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications About Us Support the Museum Products and Services Careers and Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Hours Admission Directions Exhibitions What s On Floor Plan Services Groups Home Plan Your Visit Exhibitions Fossil Gallery 360 Gallery Tour of the Talisman Energy Fossil Gallery 360 Gallery Tour of the Talisman Energy Fossil Gallery Panorama MEDIABOX360 COM Browser Plug Ins In order to fully access some of the content on this page you may need to download the following Adobe Flash Connect with Us Facebook Twitter WordPress YouTube RSS Email Canadian Museum of Nature Exploring our natural future Hours Admission Directions Our Exhibitions What s On Membership Group Visits Teacher Zone Mobile Apps Blogs Videos More Our Websites about Nature Collections Online Collection Data Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Donors and Sponsors Facility Rentals Birthday Parties Travelling Exhibition Rentals Careers Volunteering Museum News Visit Us 240 McLeod

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/plan-your-visit/what-see-do/our-exhibitions/fossil-gallery/360-gallery-tours-fossil-gallery (2016-02-07)
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  • Advantages of Adaptation—Mammal Gallery | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Have you ever wondered how a polar bear can survive in freezing Arctic waters How raccoons are able to thrive in the darkness of night The answers lie in how these animals have developed special traits to thrive in their environment and fulfill their basic needs for food protection and reproduction Through compelling three dimensional dioramas visitors to our Mammal Gallery will learn how Canadian mammals adapt to life in complex and varied environments Magnify Image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Discover what adaptations are the link between adaptation and environmental change whether mammals can adapt to a fast changing environment the essential needs of mammals and the adaptations that meet those needs major mammalian adaptations Think about it what would happen if you suddenly found yourself in freezing Arctic waters without a wetsuit and scuba gear You d quickly become a human icicle Humans may not be able to live in Arctic waters but polar bears seals and other mammals can The immersive Arctic diorama area of our Mammal Gallery explains how they re able to survive and thrive Magnify Image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close In the interpretive area you ll discover that all mammals also share basic needs that are met through adaptations They need to protect themselves from enemies acquire energy reproduce and protect themselves from the weather What varies is the way each mammal does this Explore the range of adaptations that mammals have developed to fulfill their needs then discover the secrets behind hibernation and camouflage and get to know Canada s only marsupial Don t miss the urban mammals diorama area where you ll learn about the kinds of creatures that roam our yards alleys and parks while you re tucked into your

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/plan-your-visit/what-see-do/our-exhibitions/mammal-gallery/advantages-adaptation (2016-02-07)
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  • Diorama Restoration | Canadian Museum of Nature
    of admiring onlookers with their realism and fine detail They re big too The largest is almost 5 metres high and 8 5 metres long and weighs more than 2 tonnes Magnify Image View copyright information Martin Lipman Canadian Museum of Nature Close Many hands were needed to carefully guide the diorama components across the scaffolding bridge When these installations were first created no one thought they would ever be moved But decades later renovations to the museum required that they be installed in the new Mammal Gallery on the other side of the building beyond a vast atrium Just how were these huge and heavy heritage pieces to be relocated Rebuilding these complex habitat recreations took a dedicated team of conservators scientists exhibition designers taxidermists and artists They documented the thousands of components of the 18 dioramas They cleaned reassembled and retouched everything from the background paintings to the flowers and leaves in the foregrounds The new Mammal Gallery boasts some attractive changes from its predecessor The illusion of being there is enhanced by better sightlines to the dioramas non reflective windows and higher ceilings More specimens have been added to better tell the story of mammal adaptation Each diorama is now complemented by large format touch screen computers with supplemental interactive content There are more hands on activities and new spaces in which to do them By saving the best from the past and improving the experience we ve refreshed the vitality of this historic part of the gallery Future generations of visitors can marvel at the dioramas artistry while learning about Canada s unique environments Locations Depicted Each diorama represents a location somewhere in Canada a place where one could go and stand and see virtually the same scene Grizzly Alberta Mountains on the left are in

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/plan-your-visit/what-see-do/our-exhibitions/mammal-gallery/diorama-restoration (2016-02-07)
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  • 360° Gallery Tour of the Mammal Gallery | Canadian Museum of Nature
    The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Menu Home Français Contact Us Membership Donate Skip Navigation Information for Families Teachers News Media Event Planners Tour Trade Plan Your Visit Hours Admission Directions Exhibitions What s On Floor Plan Services Groups Explore Nature Mobile Apps Our Websites about Nature Blogs Videos and More Research Collections Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications About Us Support the Museum Products and Services Careers and Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Hours Admission Directions Exhibitions What s On Floor Plan Services Groups Home Plan Your Visit Exhibitions Mammal Gallery 360 Gallery Tour of the Mammal Gallery 360 Gallery Tour of the Mammal Gallery Panorama MEDIABOX360 COM Connect with Us Facebook Twitter WordPress YouTube RSS Email Canadian Museum of Nature Exploring our natural future Hours Admission Directions Our Exhibitions What s On Membership Group Visits Teacher Zone Mobile Apps Blogs Videos More Our Websites about Nature Collections Online Collection Data Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Donors and Sponsors Facility Rentals Birthday Parties Travelling Exhibition Rentals Careers Volunteering Museum News Visit Us 240 McLeod Street Ottawa Ontario Canada corner of Metcalfe Street Telephone 613 566 4700 TTY 613

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/plan-your-visit/what-see-do/our-exhibitions/mammal-gallery/360-gallery-tour (2016-02-07)
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