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  • Canadian Emblematic Birds - Natural History Notebooks
    Jay Manitoba Great Gray Owl New Brunswick Black capped Chickadee Newfoundland and Labrador Atlantic Puffin Northwest Territories Gyrfalcon Nova Scotia Osprey Nunavut Rock Ptarmigan Ontario Common Loon Prince Edward Island Blue Jay Quebec Snowy Owl Saskatchewan Sharp tailed Grouse Yukon

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/notebooks/english/canembbirds.htm (2016-02-07)
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  • Reproduction Rights - Natural History Notebooks
    credit to the Canadian Museum of Nature We have provided a citation that you may use it is located at the bottom of each Notebook If you use text from the Natural History Notebooks and don t identify it nor give credit you are committing plagiarism This is an infringement of the Copyright Act The facts and ideas in the text on the other hand are part of the public domain In other words they belong to everyone and are not subject to copyright protection unlike the wording used to express them Illustrations and photographs are also subject to copyright protection so you do not have the right to reproduce them in most circumstances You may reproduce illustrations and photographs for personal use as long as you credit the creator and copyright owner of each image So for example you may copy an image and use it in a school project with credit given The museum does not own all of the photographs used in the Natural History Notebooks but it received permission from the owners to do so The copyright owner of each illustration and photograph is identified directly below the larger version of the image obtained by clicking

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/notebooks/english/reprorights.htm (2016-02-07)
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  • Credits - Natural History Notebooks
    Anderson Steve Cumbaa Xiao chun Wu Writers Barbara Rottenberg Dale Russell Donna Naughton Jacqueline Madill Kathleen Quinn Michael Runtz Michaela Roenspies Michèle Steigerwald Natalia Rybczynski Richard Day Richard Harington Shauna Guillemin Steve Cumbaa Translators Carl Angers Comtra Les Traducteurs réunis Nicole Castéran Editor English Kathleen Quinn Editors French Andrée Proulx Francine Bouvier Goodman Michel Gosselin Nicole Paquette Word Processing Carl Angers Kathleen Quinn Nicole Castéran Photographers Photographers are credited on the page that includes the thumbnail sized version of their photograph i e the Notebook Creators of the images used to represent each category in the category navigation buttons Allan Brooks Anna Yu Canadian Museum of Nature Eric Engbretson Gerald and Buff Corsi California Academy of Sciences Getty Images James Benet John J Mosesso NBII Copyright owners are noted on the page that includes the larger version of the photograph i e the pop up Illustrators Alex Tirabasso Charles Douglas Julius Csotonyi Roelof Idema Illustrators are credited on the Notebook page in which their illustration appears Image Production Jana Gillis Russ Brooks Photograph Research Lynda Beaudoin Andrea Della Valle Jennifer Roger Kathleen Quinn Photograph Assistance Anne Marie Barter Dominique Dufour Donna Naughton John Sharpe Michèle Steigerwald Richard Martin Roger Baird

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/notebooks/english/credits.htm (2016-02-07)
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  • Biodiversity of the Rideau River: Animals and Plants, Menu.
    The Rideau River Biodiversity Project Last Update 2007 05 18 Site map Comments or Questions A Canadian Museum of Nature Web site nature ca Images Canadian Museum of Nature Thomas

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/rideau/b/mn-e.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Biodiversity of the Rideau River: Water Quality, Summary.
    industrial pollution Indeed the water quality in the Rideau River is relatively good and supports a diversity of animal and plant life During the three years of the Project bacteria levels in the River were low enough to permit swimming on most days without risk Note The Rideau River diverges from the Rideau Canal on the edge of downtown Ottawa the ensuing stretch of the Canal is not included in these results An aquatic beetle of the genus Peltodyte family Only the excess fertilizer that was present in the River during each summer casts a slight pall over the otherwise bright picture The 30 000 water chemistry measurements taken by the research team indicate that water quality is good between Smiths Falls and Kars Downstream of Kars towards Ottawa however there were excessive amounts of fertilizer in the water This is not dangerous for swimmers the way bacteria can be but it does cause excessive growth of plants and algae The resulting dense mats of decaying algae on the surface of the water can become a nuisance Find out the difference between a river s water and pure water and learn about the roles played by various components in the

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/rideau/c/c1-e.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Detection of components Macromedia Flash

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    Original URL path: /rideau/e/index-e.html (2016-02-07)


  • Biodiversity of the Rideau River: History and Geography of the Rideau River.
    several important transformations since settlement along its banks began around 1790 Construction between 1826 and 1832 of the Rideau Canal of which the Rideau River is a major component modified the landscape considerably A River A Canal With a length of 202 km the Rideau Canal connects Lake Ontario at Kingston to the Ottawa River at Ottawa It comprises a chain of lakes rivers and artificial channels Upper Rideau Lake near Smiths Falls is the highest point along the Canal From there the water flows both northeast toward Ottawa in the Rideau River and southwest toward Kingston in the Cataraqui River A lock on the Rideau River near Manotick The Rideau River is one and the same as the Canal for most of the River s length The River diverges from the Canal in Ottawa Only the Canal provides access for boats to the Ottawa River A system of 47 locks overcomes the 83 m decrease in elevation between the Upper Rideau Lake and the Ottawa River and the 50 m decrease between this lake and Lake Ontario The locks also allow the water level to be maintained at not less than 1 5 m deep for the passage of

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/rideau/a/a1-e.html (2016-02-07)
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  • Biodiversity of the Rideau River: Origins and Goals.
    the River that passes through Ottawa A student analyses chlorophyll As public interest mounted and thanks to the contributions of various financial partners the field of study was expanded in 1998 to develop a more complete picture of the Rideau River Seven areas of study were added fish birds amphibians reptiles indigenous freshwater mussels aquatic invertebrates and aquatic plants The length of the Rideau River to be studied was stretched from Smiths Falls to the Ottawa River The Rideau River Biodiversity Project was initiated with the goal of recording the River s biodiversity of determining its bill of health and of working towards its preservation all with the close co operation of the community Over the course of the summer of 2000 the scientists witnessed just what a jewel we have in the Rideau River Discover for yourself what animals live in it what plants grow in it and learn whether at the time of the study it was possible to swim in it in perfect safety Notable Numbers Participation Members of research team 31 including 10 university students Scientific disciplines 9 Other Museum staff members participating in the Project 18 Volunteers who gladly gave their time and energy 50 Hours of volunteer assistance more than 1000 Organizations municipalities public and private corporations and businesses that participated in the Project or supported it in various ways 61 Resources Project budget financed primarily by the Canadian Museum of Nature and the Echo Foundation formerly EJLB Foundation but also supported by numerous partners 1 000 000 Results New pieces of data gathered about the River and its fauna and flora more than 100 000 Sampling sites more than 150 Laboratory analyses more than 30 000 Species of plants and animals found during the Project nearly 600 Scientific articles published before the end

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/rideau/g/g1-e.html (2016-02-07)
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