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  • Five-Year Project to Record Arctic's Botanical Bounty | Canadian Museum of Nature
    plants In addition to a core group of scientists from the Canadian Museum of Nature the 13 member team includes botanists from Canada Agriculture and Agri Food Canada University of Manitoba and Université de Montréal as well as Norway and Alaska Each brings knowledge about specific plant groups as well as access to Arctic based collections The nature of taxonomy is that it is always changing distributions names and even species may be revised over time So we want to take what s known add to it and set a new baseline to document Arctic plants and guide future research explains Saarela With climate change known to be affecting the Arctic the project has immediate relevance Plants are found in all Arctic ecosystems and they are known to be affected by changes in temperature and moisture As the climate changes plants may migrate or distributions may be altered We know for example that some shrubs such as willows and birch are getting bigger explains Saarela As well there are some areas along the tree line where species more common to the boreal forest are slowly moving north to settle in Arctic ecozones The Arctic Flora Project builds on the museum s traditional strength in Arctic research In the National Herbarium of Canada the Canadian Museum of Nature houses the most complete collection of Canadian Arctic plants some of which date to the 19th century Museum botanists have authored several floras for the Arctic islands including Dr Susan Aiken s 2007 Flora of the Canadian Archipelago And for almost a century museum staff have explored Canada s northern regions to collect identify and study botanical specimens Recent fieldwork expeditions have taken them to Victoria Island and the remote Tuktut Nogait National Park in the Northwest Territories Thankfully there is already much that the project team can draw from Numerous floras exist for regions of northern North America including the Canadian Arctic Islands Nunavut Yukon Alaska the continental Northwest Territories and northern Quebec and Labrador forthcoming But there are gaps in knowledge from poorly explored or under collected areas and some references are decades old When you have multiple treatments you don t get the full picture and you want something that covers the whole region explains Saarela There are challenges ahead One is to locate all relevant collections that include current records of Arctic plants As well most collections are not well digitized meaning the records about what species exist and where they have been found cannot be easily shared Getting feet on the ground will also be essential to surveying under explored areas These include parts of northern Baffin Island as well as large portions of the interior of Nunavut You can use satellite imagery to assess large areas but to record biodiversity in a fine way you need to be on the ground and collect it says Saarela Once you have something and bring it into an official museum collection it becomes part of the permanent scientific record Once

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/about-us/museum-news/news/five-year-project-record-arctics-botanical-bounty (2016-02-07)
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  • Yemisi Dare—Professional Profile | Canadian Museum of Nature
    for museum objects http nature ca en research collections scientific services acid free storage boxes Publications Refereed Journal Papers Dare O K and M R Forbes 2013 Do invasive bullfrogs in Victoria British Columbia Canada show evidence of parasite release Journal of Helminthology 87 195 202 Dare O K and W G Watkins 2013 First Record of Parasites from Cougars Puma concolor in Manitoba Canada Canadian Field Naturalist 126 4 324 327 Gilbert N O K Dare M Libman P Muchaal and N Ogden 2010 Hospitalization for trichinellosis and echinococcosis in Canada 2001 2005 the Tip of the Iceberg Canadian Journal of Public Health 101 4 337 340 Dare O K and M R Forbes 2009 Patterns of trematode and nematode lungworm infections in two ranid hosts Northern leopard frogs Lithobates pipiens and Wood frogs Lithobates sylvaticus Journal of Helminthology 83 4 339 343 Dare O K and M R Forbes 2008 Patterns of infection by lungworms Rhabdias ranae and Haematoloechus spp in Northern leopard frogs a relationship between sex and parasitism Journal of Parasitology 95 2 275 280 Dare O K S Nadler and M R Forbes 2008 Nematode lungworms of two anuran amphibians evidence for coadaptation International Journal for Parasitology 38 1729 1736 Dare O K and M R Forbes 2008 Rates of development in male and female Wood frogs and patterns of parasitism by lung nematodes Parasitology 135 3 385 393 Dare O K P L Rutherford and M R Forbes 2006 Rearing density and susceptibility of Rana pipiens metamorphs to cercariae of a digenetic trematode Journal of Parasitology 92 3 543 547 Scott M E O K Dare T Tu and K G Koski 2005 Mild energy restriction alters mouse nematode transmission dynamics in free running indoor arenas Canadian Journal of Zoology 83 4 610 619 Non Refereed Publications Dare O K and M R Forbes 2013 Do invasive bullfrogs in Victoria British Columbia Canada show evidence of parasite release Journal of Helminthology 87 195 202 Dare O K and W G Watkins 2013 First Record of Parasites from Cougars Puma concolor in Manitoba Canada Canadian Field Naturalist 126 4 324 327 Gilbert N O K Dare M Libman P Muchaal and N Ogden 2010 Hospitalization for trichinellosis and echinococcosis in Canada 2001 2005 the Tip of the Iceberg Canadian Journal of Public Health 101 4 337 340 Dare O K and M R Forbes 2009 Patterns of trematode and nematode lungworm infections in two ranid hosts Northern leopard frogs Lithobates pipiens and Wood frogs Lithobates sylvaticus Journal of Helminthology 83 4 339 343 Dare O K and M R Forbes 2008 Patterns of infection by lungworms Rhabdias ranae and Haematoloechus spp in Northern leopard frogs a relationship between sex and parasitism Journal of Parasitology 95 2 275 280 Dare O K S Nadler and M R Forbes 2008 Nematode lungworms of two anuran amphibians evidence for coadaptation International Journal for Parasitology 38 1729 1736 Dare O K and M R Forbes 2008 Rates of development

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/science-experts/yemisi-dare (2016-02-07)
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  • Michel Gosselin—Professional Profile | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Careers and Volunteering Museum News The Museum Corporation History and Buildings Skip Navigation Collections Research Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Home Research Collections Science Experts Michel Gosselin Michel Gosselin Collection Manager Zoology Contact Information Email mgosselin mus nature ca Tel 613 566 4291 Fax 613 364 4027 Michel Gosselin is the museum s go to bird expert and is in charge of the collection of bird specimens Education M A Museology Université du Québec à Montréal 1997 Profile Michel Gosselin is in charge of the museum s 125 000 bird specimens which span about a quarter of all bird species on Earth including some extinct ones This is the world s largest collection of Canadian bird specimens and informs our understanding about the diversity anatomy natural history and evolution of birds Michel chooses which birds to display in the museum s bird gallery supervises the use of specimens by visiting scientists artists and dedicated bird watchers and oversees loans to other museums and universities His work ranges from vetting the accuracy of bird figures depicted on Canadian coins such as the special edition 2012 Summer Olympics Lucky Loonie to assessing status reports on endangered species Michel has written a number of technical and popular articles about birds and has travelled extensively across Canada Latin America and Europe to study them He is also an advisor to the Check List Committee of the American Ornithologists Union and the Canadian Wildlife Habitat Conservation Stamp competition In the Museum s Blog Bird Nests A Little Known Collection Birds capacity for adaptation and perseverance helps them make a nest that can camouflage their young and keep them warm Find out about the amazing bird nest collection at the museum Continue reading Connect with Us Facebook Twitter WordPress YouTube RSS Email Canadian

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/science-experts/michel-gosselin (2016-02-07)
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  • Mark S. Graham—Professional Profile | Canadian Museum of Nature
    a data portal for museum specimens Professional Services Member Management Board Federal Biodiversity Information Partnership Member Editorial Advisory Committee Canadian Geographic Magazine Member Editorial Board Journal of Museum Management and Curatorship 1st Vice Chair Science Committee Global Biodiversity Information Facility Co chair Coordination Mechanism Global Taxonomy Initiative Canadian Focal Point Global Taxonomy Initiative Downloads Graham M 2005 The Global Taxonomy Initiative The Canadian Botanical Association Bulletin 38 3 35 36 33 Kb PDF Canadian Taxonomy Exploring Biodiversity creating opportunity 2010 Canadian Council of Academies http www scienceadvice ca en assessments completed biodiversity aspx Links Alliance of Natural History Museums of Canada http www naturalhistorymuseums ca Federal Biodiversity Information Partnership http www cbif gc ca Global Biodiversity Information Facility http www gbif org Global Taxonomy Initiative http www cbd int gti Journal of Museum Management and Curatorship http www informaworld com smpp title content t770943820 db all Royal Canadian Geographical Society http www rcgs org Publications Graham M 2012 The future of museum authentic trusted accessible Museum iD 10 39 Graham M and D Jomphe 2010 A museum and a University co staff a research scientist J Museum Management and Curatorship 25 1 107 116 Graham M 2009 Museums and the far reaches of the world museum based research and outreach during the International Polar Year Les muse et les confines du monde recherché muséale et activités de diffusion externe des musées pendant l année polaire international Muse March April 22 27 30 35 Graham M and Baird R 2007 Focus on Museums Collecting Collating and Careers The Canadian Museum of Nature in the Molecular Era Bulletin of the Canadian Society of Zoology 38 3 18 19 http www csz scz ca bulletins CSZ 20Bulletin 20Fall 07 pdf Web site consulted November 10 2008 Graham M 2005 The Global Taxonomy Initiative

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/science-experts/mark-s-graham (2016-02-07)
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  • Scott Rufolo—Professional Profile | Canadian Museum of Nature
    a graduate student He used the osteology reference collection to analyze some 40 000 animal specimens from Syria dating back to the Early Bronze Age Following completion of his degree and a post doctoral appointment in Germany Scott volunteered as a fossil preparator with the museum until being hired part time to prepare fossils and help manage the Nunavut archaeological collection that is housed at the museum In 2014 he happily joined the full time ranks of the Palaeobiology Section as a Research Assistant In addition to continuing his duties overseeing the Nunavut archaeological material Scott supports a research programme focused on better understanding the Late Cretaceous ecosystems of southern Alberta and a research collaboration in East Africa to investigate the contribution and importance of fish to the diet and brain evolution of our early human ancestors Professional Services Zooarchaeological identification and training Publications Refereed Journal Papers Lemoine X Zeder M A Bishop K J and Rufolo S J In press A New System for Computing Dentition Based Age Profiles in Sus scrofa Journal of Archaeological Science Zeder M A Bar Oz G Rufolo S J and Hole F 2013 New Perspectives on the Use of Kites in Mass Kills of Levantine Gazelle A View from Northeastern Syria Quaternary International 297 110 125 Chippindale C de Jongh J Flood J and Rufolo S J 2000 Stratigraphy Harris Matrices and Relative Dating of Australian Rock Art Antiquity 74 284 285 286 Refereed Book Chapters Rufolo S J In press New Thoughts on the Role of the Middle Khabur Syria in the Urbanization of Northern Mesopotamia in the Early Bronze Age In Mashkour M and Beech M eds Archaeozoology of the Near East IX Proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on the Archaeozoology of Southwestern Asia and Adjacent Areas Oxbow Oxford England

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/science-experts/scott-rufolo (2016-02-07)
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  • Carolyn Leckie—Professional Profile | Canadian Museum of Nature
    Projects Science Experts Scientific Services Leadership Scientific Publications Home Research Collections Science Experts Carolyn Leckie Carolyn Leckie Conservator Collections Services and Information Management Contact Information Email cleckie mus nature ca Tel 613 566 4797 Fax 613 364 4027 Carolyn Leckie is responsible for the long term preservation of the museum s 10 2 million specimens that are in collection storage and on exhibit Profile Museums exist to collect preserve and interpret It is Carolyn s job to promote a culture of preservation that will ensure the museum s collection will last for generations Collections in natural history museums act as a library of life and serve as the data on which scientific research is based The museum s research demands massive collections and therefore only a preventive preservation approach is realistic Every aspect of the design and operation of the storage facility at the museum s research and collection facility is taken into account to reduce the risk of catastrophic damage fire floods and earthquakes as well as other problems such as light insects pollutants temperature and humidity Given the tremendous range of specimens from fossils to DNA there is a long interesting list of preservation issues to address When specimens are selected to go on exhibit they are much more prone to damage and receive a higher level of care For these projects Carolyn gets to participate in the planning and design of the exhibition and then has the pleasure of carefully unpacking and inspecting specimens and if necessary repairing the specimens and objects that visitors come to see In the Museum s Blog The Strap Toothed Whale A Fascinating Specimen in Whales Tohorā As a conservator with the museum Carolyn Leckie has examined all the specimens in the exhibition Whales Tohorā The strap toothed whale s bizarre teeth

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/research-collections/science-experts/carolyn-leckie (2016-02-07)
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  • You Can Make a Difference to the Arctic | Canadian Museum of Nature
    s fossil treasures for a collection that belongs to all Canadians Catch a glimpse of his journey to Baffin Island in the video above Arctic Engagement The Canadian Museum of Nature has undertaken a five year Arctic Initiative to enhance and advance the research collections education and exhibition programmes focused on Canada s Arctic To share our Arctic knowledge the museum has created a new exhibition that will travel across North America over the next five years Arctic Voices transports visitors into the fascinating and changing world of the Arctic Through the lenses of land sea and ice the exhibition introduces the remarkable animals that live there the resilient people who inhabit the region and the dedicated scientists who work to understand the impact of climate change This exhibition is a forerunner for a new permanent Arctic gallery at the Canadian Museum of Nature which will open in 2017 in celebration of Canada s 150th anniversary Magnify image View copyright information Michelle Valberg Michelle Valberg Close A walrus Odobenus rosmarus Play a Part This is your opportunity to make the difference to our work in the Canadian Arctic By supporting researchers like Dr Shepherd you will be contributing to the creation and advancement of knowledge about our shared natural environment Become a NaturePatron to make a difference to the Arctic and receive special museum benefits To become a NaturePatron contact us 613 566 4201 investnature mus nature ca Or you can donate now online Sign up for our e newsletter Subscribe Expedition Arctic Web Site Join museum experts and Students on Ice to learn about plants animals and fossils of the Arctic Produced with the Virtual Museum of Canada In the Field In Our Blog Our scientists work in extraordinary places Find out where they are doing their fieldwork and

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/about-us/support-museum/donations/nature-patrons-individuals/you-can-make-difference-arctic (2016-02-07)
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  • Green Space and Parking at the Canadian Museum of Nature | Canadian Museum of Nature
    prairie grasslands trail The gardens will also continue to welcome the public at large from dog walkers as long as they poop and scoop to those seeking a natural experience in an urban area What will happen to the grass lawn This area will be transformed into the prairie grasslands zone Once the grasses grow in a trail will be mown through the grasslands A circular clearing will also be created to serve as a natural outdoor classroom area or gathering space What are some of the plants that visitors can expect to see All are species that are native to Canada They were chosen because they represent species that are typically found in the the ecozones boreal prairie and tundra Also they are species that stand an excellent chance of growing in an Ottawa climate For the tundra zone plants will include purple saxifrage Saxifraga oppositifolia Arctic willow Salix arctica and bearberry Arctostaphylos sp In the prairie zone plants will include six species of grasses as well as swamp milkweed Asclepias incarnate purple cornflower Echinacea purpurea and prairie crocus Pulsatilla ludoviciana The boreal zone will include trees and plants such as white spruce Picea glauca trembling aspen Populus tremuloides black larch Larix laricina jack pine Pinus banksiana and balsam fir Abies balsamea What is the status of trees on the site The museum takes seriously the removal of any trees on its site whether for health and safety reasons or others and looks for mitigations where possible In general the plans for the Landscapes of Canada gardens include maintaining existing trees as well as the addition of new greenery that includes trees shrubs and plants The museum also continues to actively monitor the health and safety of trees on the site through its existing landscaping inspections Parking How many parking spots does the museum have The museum now has 192 spots 96 on the east side and 96 on the west side about 6500 square feet in total Prior to renovations in 2004 the museum had 176 parking spots about 8000 square feet in a ring that circled the museum How did the current plans for parking evolve Prior to renovations in 2004 the museum had 176 parking spots centred in a ring that circled the museum During renovations the west side of the museum served as a staging area for construction Permanent parking was moved to the east side of the museum today there are 96 spots and additional parking options were explored one being underground parking The goal for the west side was to landscape the parkland as green space according to the site s Master Plan When the construction was completed in 2010 the museum continued to use the west side as temporary parking while it pursued plans for underground parking in recognition of the fact that the parking on the east side would not be sufficient for visitors What is the current status of parking on the west side As of May 2015 Following the

    Original URL path: http://nature.ca/en/about-us/museum-news/news/green-space-parking-canadian-museum-nature (2016-02-07)
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