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  • Road Talk, Vol. 13, Issue 1
    2 to 5 years compared to 6 to 13 months with wicks The wick drain technology was chosen at 5 of a total 10 swamp locations within the project Wicks were selected at the sites where the clay thicknesses exceeded 10 metres and where embankment heights exceeded 6 metres Wicks were designed at a 1 5 m triangular grid pattern to depths ranging from 10 to 25 metres below original ground Figure 1 The total length of wick drains is 785 000 metres approximately equivilent to a round trip between St Catharines and Sudbury Wick installation commenced in the summer of 2006 under Contract 2006 5150 awarded to Pioneer Construction and currently scheduled for completion in summer 2009 On this project wicks are being installed within a temporary steel rectangular casing that is pushed into the ground using a backhoe modified with a vertical lead Figure 2 The procedure is analogous to a sewing machine whereby a spool of wick drain is fed into the mandrel as the mandrel is pushed into the ground to the design depth The measurable success of wick drain technology on MTO projects has revolutionized the methodology of embankment construction over swamps The advent of wick drain technology has resulted in more efficient construction methods increased cost savings and minimal disturbance to the environment On this project the development of the wick drain design illustrated a successful partnership between the Prime Consultant URS Canada Inc the Foundations Engineering subonsultant Golders Associates Northeastern Region Planning and Design and the Pavements Foundations Section November 2001 Road Talk Vol 7 Issue 4 Wick drains are prefabricated plastic cores wrapped in a geotextile cloth which draw water from the soil when pushed into the earth Wick drains accelerate the settlement of road embankments For more information contact Tony Sangiuliano Materials Engineering and Research Office Phone 416 235 5267 E mail tony sangiuliano ontario ca For more info on Highway 69 Four Laning visit http www mto gov on ca english traveller highway69 index shtml Top of page Corrosion Inhibitors Test MTO Test for Optimal Winter Inhibitors Level Figure 1 Coupons mounted under the body of winter maintenance vehicles Figure 2 Detail of metal coupons exposed to areas with WRMLs containing different levels of corrosion inhibitors MTO s corrosion inhibitor requirements for winter road maintenance liquids WRML are being re evaluated using tests that measure their performance under real world conditions Liquids were introduced to the snow and ice control program beginning in 2000 after tests confirmed that they improve the effectiveness of road salt and can result in an overall reduction in salt use They are either applied directly to the pavement in advance of snowfall or are sprayed onto granular salt as it is spread during a storm A requirement that liquids other than those made from rock salt include corrosion inhibiting additives was introduced when contractors expressed concern that the liquids might add to rusting of their vehicles The requirement closely follows that of other industry groups such as the Pacific Northwest Snowfighters specifying that they reduce corrosion levels substantially below that of rock salt solution under laboratory conditions Since then contractors have requested exemptions from the corrosion inhibitor requirement in an effort to reduce costs MTO launched field tests in fall 2006 to provide guidance in setting cost effective requirements for corrosion inhibitors The tests will provide comparative data on corrosion levels occurring over a winter season on test coupons installed on trucks and roadside infrastructure in areas where different levels of inhibitor are used The project was undertaken by MTO s Design and Contract Standards Materials Engineering and Research Offices Southwest Region and Eastern Region with assistance from contractors Steed and Evans and TWD Roads Management Corrosion coupons of specified steel and aluminum measuring 89 0 x 50 0 mm x 1 59 mm thick were weighed numbered and then suspended on threaded nylon rods The rods were either bolted or wired to the frames of two combination plow spreader trucks and one patrol vehicle Figure 1 two steel guide rail posts two signposts and an environmental control away from the highway in each test area 560 coupons were installed in total The coupons are exposed to WRMLs with inhibitor levels of 0 50 and 70 less corrosive as compared to sodium chloride brine The WRMLs include sodium chloride brine magnesium chloride brine and a multi chloride brine containing sodium calcium and magnesium The coupons are exposed to all winter maintenance and environmental conditions that naturally occur in each field area and will provide a practical evaluation of the effectiveness of the inhibitors The coupons will remain mounted for the full winter season They will be retrieved and re weighed in Spring 2007 to determine the extent of corrosion occurring in each area and the optimal percentage of inhibitors to use in MTO contracts Look to future issues of Road Talk for coverage of preliminary results The use of DLA and Pre wet complement the conventional practice of spreading granular sodium chloride salt during winter storms For more information contact Max Perchanok Maintenance Office Phone 905 704 2638 E mail max perchanok ontario ca Top of page MIT 2 Scan Evaluated on Dowel Bars Concrete Proof Figure 1 MTO Staff scan dowel bar position Highway 401 In Ontario concrete pavement design for heavily trafficked highways consists of doweled jointed plain concrete pavement JPCP over an open graded drainage layer OGDL and granular base and sub base Epoxy coated smooth 456 x 32 mm steel dowel bars are placed at 300 mm centres across the transverse joints to provide load transfer Longitudinal joints are tied with 15 x 760 mm tie bars spaced at 600 mm intervals In the past the position and alignment of dowel bars within a concrete pavement was difficult to verify MTO required that cut outs 2m x full paver width be made to ensure that the placement and alignment of the dowel bars met contract requirements This type of destructive verification

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transtek/roadtalk/rt13-1/ (2014-08-11)
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  • Transportation Environmental Study Report - Executive Summary
    to Highway 417 through the study area have resulted in a number of features that are considered sub standard by today s standards including mainline horizontal and vertical alignment elements ramp geometry and lane shoulder widths and The majority of the existing highway infrastructure is in need of significant rehabilitation and or replacement over the planning horizon of this study in order to maintain its functionality Design Alternatives The Highway 417 study corridor was divided into independent segments interchanges and groups of interchanges for the development assessment and evaluation of design alternatives Each independent set of alternatives was reviewed to determine the applicable factors and sub factors for the evaluation process A multi disciplinary team with representatives from the City NCC MTO and the consultants preformed the evaluation with input for the sensitivity testing from the Public Advisory Committee The preferred alternatives were then presented to the public and agencies at Public Involvement Centre 2 and refinements were made to reflect input received Mainline The alternatives for the mainline widening were limited to Do Nothing and Strategic Widening including application of positive guidance measures ATMS and the following basic mainline lanes Widen from 3 to 4 basic lanes per direction from Highway 416 to Carling Avenue Retain existing 4 basic lanes per direction from Carling Avenue to Kent Street Retain existing 3 4 basic lanes per direction from Kent Street to Metcalfe Street Widen from 3 to 4 basic lanes per direction from Metcalfe Street to Ottawa Road 174 and Widen Highway 417 from 2 to 3 basic lanes per direction from Ottawa Road 174 to east of Walkley Road Following the evaluation strategic widening was selected as the preferred design alternative as it addressed traffic operations and safety issues while minimizing impacts on the environment In order to avoid property impacts to the extent practical retaining walls were incorporated into the highway design wherever possible Remaining property requirements to accommodate the proposed widening consist of one residence and some strips of property A landscaping concept was developed to guide mitigation measures for unavoidable impacts on existing roadside vegetation There will be benefits to the City road network as a result of the strategic widening as traffic will be more balanced between Highway 417 and City streets The strategic widening will help address the future east west capacity shortfall identified by the City even with the achievement of the established 30 transit mode share target The strategic widening received general support during consultation and was carried forward to the Recommended Plan Interchanges For each interchange location alternative ramp configurations and or closures were identified to address traffic safety and or geometric concerns Some alternatives were developed with input from the public and or agencies With the selection of the strategic widening alternative for the mainline the base case alternative for each of the interchanges included modifications to the ramps to fit the mainline widening where required Input from the public was instrumental in the refinement of the technically preferred alternatives In particular the initially proposed modification of the ramp at Island Park Drive was removed from consideration Table E 1 summarizes the technically preferred alternatives at each location within the Study Area along with the rationale for the selection of that alternative and the associated impacts Table E 1 Technically Preferred Interchange Alternatives Technically Preferred Alternative Location Rationale and Impacts Merged Ramp from Highway 416 417 to Holly Acres Road Do nothing Separation of traffic streams or realignment of one of the ramps was not feasible due to the proximity of other roads and bridges Richmond Road Location Rationale and Impacts North Side Implement positive guidance measures on westbound off ramp This improves safety without requiring geometric changes no impacts South Side Close Richmond Road eastbound on ramps provide new eastbound on ramp from Holly Acres Road This maintains all moves without requiring property from properties along Queensline backing onto the Queensway some impacts to Graham Creek traffic operations emergency response level of service trees and shrubs and costs Pinecrest Greenbank Road Location Rationale and Impacts Widening Profile Change Do nothing Additional lane s would not address the traffic issues associated with this area Visibility of traffic signals can be improved without replacing the overpass North Side Modify ramps as needed to accommodate the West Transitway and station Approved plans for West Transitway include interchange modifications at Pinecrest Road that were incorporated into this study South Side Modify curvature of on ramp from northbound Greenbank Road to the eastbound Queensway Maintain Ashley Street connection Ramp realignment improves geometrics and safety with minor impacts to vegetation and costs Closure of the Ashley Street ramp connection would have resulted in unacceptable traffic infiltration operations and safety impacts Woodroffe Avenue Location Rationale and Impacts Widening Widen Woodroffe Avenue to provide northbound left turn lane to the westbound on ramp Bridge widening removes left turners from the through lane improving safety with minor property impacts North Side Reconfigure interchange Combine the exit to northbound and southbound Woodroffe into one loop ramp on west side of the bridge Parclo B configuration Provide direct transit only ramp connection on east side This new configuration addresses safety concerns for pedestrians and cyclists while maintaining transit and general traffic operations and minimizing residential and institutional property impacts South Side Eliminate free flow right turn This removes free flow conflict with acceptable impact on traffic operations Maitland Avenue Location Rationale and Impacts Widening Widen Maitland Avenue to improve northbound left turn lane for the westbound on ramp Bridge widening provides more storage for left turners in both directions with minor impact on institutional property North Side Do nothing Interchange re configuration would result in unacceptable impacts to residential and institutional land uses and to traffic on local City streets South Side Do nothing Interchange re configuration would result in unacceptable impacts to residential land use Modifications to signalization to be investigated by the City Carling Avenue Location Rationale and Impacts North Side Do nothing No reasonable alternatives identified for

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/engineering/417ea/final.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Road Talk, Vol. 12, Issue 3
    accommodate storms that occur once in 5 years Larger highway drainage systems designed for a once in 50 year storm period might only be able to accommodate a once in 20 year storm period Dr Coulibaly suggests that design flow rates the estimated runoff flow rates may need to be increased leading to larger bridges culverts storm sewers and stormwater management ponds to maintain the level of service provided today and to avoid potential constricted water flow and possible future flooding events While this research provides some insight into the potential impact of climate change on highway drainage infrastructure based on a limited number of sites and a short period of rainfall record more research is required to fully understand future climate effects on rainfall and flow rates before considering modifications to highway drainage design standards For more information contact Hani Farghaly Highway Design Office Phone 905 704 2244 E mail hani farghaly ontario ca Dr Paulin Coulibaly Department of Civil Engineerin McMaster University Phone 905 525 9140 ext 23354 E mail couliba mcmaster ca Top of page Asset Management A Growing OGRA Member Service Supported by the Ministry of transportation Municipal DataWorks Municipalities are accountable for managing billions of dollars worth of assets which requires accurate and reliable information on the assets inventory and current conditions for future planning With this in mind the Ontario Good Roads Association OGRA developed the Municipal DataWorks MDW program to address the asset management needs of municipal governments in Ontario Asset management is a corporate philosophy that utilizes a system of formal processes based on engineering principles sound business practices and economic rationale to effectively maintain upgrade and operate public infrastructure assets over their lifecycles To manage and maintain public infrastructure municipalities must possess relevant strategic and operational information and analysis which can be obtained through asset management practices The Ministry of Transportation MTO has provided start up funding for the development of MDW a smart investment based on achievements to date with this new OGRA member service A good asset management system depends on data that is current easily accessible easy to manage and ideally based on a uniform standard which is consistent across the province Municipal DataWorks is a web based data storage repository for infrastructure asset data based on Municipal Infrastructure Data Standard MIDS 3 0 the new common data standard for Ontario MDW features the core asset inventory and the condition repository for roads bridges water and sewers In addition the program also includes road and bridge inspection tools a Capital Investment Plan tool CIP and a Road Data Conversion tool RDC Currently an Asset Valuation module is being developed to assist municipalities in calculating asset values and generating reports that will comply with upcoming Public Sector Accounting Board PSAB requirements MDW is an OGRA member service that allows municipalities service providers OGRA and the provincial government to collect access evaluate and report on infrastructure assets The Ministry of Transportation looks to Municipal DataWorks for the collection of municipal road system data and for tools that municipalities can use to provide the Road Sufficiency Index RSI by using the Pavement Condition Index PCI the Bridge Condition Index BCI and the Bridge Sufficiency Index BSI calculations for the Canada Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund COMRIF and legacy funding programs The road and bridge inventory and inspection module launched in 2005 provides inspection forms and calculators for PCI BCI and BSI The Capital Investment Plan CIP tool launched in June 2006 allows municipalities to analyze their asset data and create a long term investment plan that answers crucial questions like What work needs to be done Which work should be done first How much it will cost How it will affect the condition of the operating network What will be the impact on the operating costs Obtaining this information results in assets being treated with appropriate interventions to extend their useful life which will save the municipality money in the long run The latest module released in July 2006 stores water and sewer asset data plus tracks the condition of water storm and sanitary sewer networks Municipalities can use MDW to record store and analyze asset and condition information about pipes catch basins hydrants and valves The water and sewer module also supports Bill 175 by enabling municipalities to better assess the condition of their municipal water and sewer networks a matter that is becoming increasingly important to the Province of Ontario Bill 175 requires municipalities to report to the Ministry of Environment on the provision of water and wastewater services including information on the full cost of providing services i e operating financing renewal replacement and improvement costs After recognizing the benefits of Municipal DataWorks the Ontario Road Builders Association ORBA recently contributed funding towards development In addition to partnerships with MTO and ORBA twenty one service providers are using MDW on behalf of municipal clients thus demonstrating the practical application of MDW To get started on using MDW municipalities must sign the municipal Data Provision Agreement DPA or have their service provider sign the Licence Agreement to use MDW on their behalf Both agreements are available on the OGRA MDW website To take MDW for a test run in Demo Town visit the OGRA MDW website click on Test Drive fill out the request for contact information and send You will receive a user ID and password in a separate email The Ontario Good Roads Association looks forward to the continued progress of MDW as an indispensable member service MDW not only provides asset management tools for OGRA members but is also a key part of OGRA s advocacy program for sustainable funding for municipal infrastructure in Ontario MDW Highlights As a member service OGRA provides MDW at no cost to municipalities A data warehouse compatible with the Municipal Infrastructure Data Standard MIDS 3 where municipalities can build and maintain their inventory of public works assets MDW features Road and Bridge Inspection Tools including calculation of BCI and BSI

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transtek/roadtalk/rt12-3/ (2014-08-11)
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  • 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey
    TTS 2006 consists of two phases The first phase took place between September 2005 and February 2006 and included residents outside of the Greater Toronto Hamilton area Phase two of the survey began in August 2006 and included residents within the Greater Toronto Hamilton area The map outlines the study survey area The telephone survey is expected to be complete by early December 2006 The sample data will then be combined with the results of the 2006 Census of Canada to develop a comprehensive picture of travel characteristics across the Greater Golden Horseshoe Final results of the survey will be available by fall 2007 A letter signed by the Minister of Transportation and the Mayors and Regional Chairs of the GTA Hamilton area will be sent to households that are to be interviewed informing them of the survey and the type of information to be collected To see a sample of the letter please go TTS s website TTS Letters to Household All information collected during the survey is kept in the strictest confidence and combined together with information from other households in the area in such a way that it cannot be traced to an individual or household Names addresses and phone numbers are destroyed at the conclusion of the survey s data collection phase Did you receive a letter in the mail If you received a letter about TTS we encourage you to participate in the survey When the interviewer calls you will be asked a series of questions about the previous day s travel activity of all members in your household The information provided will be used to show travel patterns in your area The information you provide will help us better serve the transportation needs within your communities If you did not receive a letter Only randomly selected households can be interviewed as part of the survey to ensure the validity of the information that is collected Results will be made available in the fall of 2007 and will be published on the website Did you know that Total travel in the GTA Hamilton Area has increased by 40 between 1986 and 2001 The increase has to do with the increase in population and the increase in the number of trips taken Almost one quarter of total daily travel in the Greater Golden Horseshoe occurs in the morning peak period between 6 00 and 9 00 a m The commute to work accounts for more than half 52 of total trips made in the morning peak period In the City of Toronto one quarter of households do not have access to a car on a regular basis In the Region of York 18 of households have 3 or more vehicles In 2001 over a 24 hour period transit including both GO and local transit accounted for 16 of total trips The average length of trips taken by GO Rail is almost 30 km The average length of trips taken on local transit is 5 5 km

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/about/transit/TTsurvey.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • IRP News
    Brokers Certificates and holding a Surety Bond Trust account requirement remains in effect Note There have been no changes to the for hire bus requirement under the Public Vehicles Act For more information contact Carrier Sanctions Investigations Office 301 St Paul Street 3rd Floor St Catharines Ontario L2R 7R4 Phone 416 246 7166 or 1 800 387 7736 in Ontario Top of page IRP Plan Rewrite IRP Inc the official organization serving the 59 U S and Canadian jurisdictions that are members of the International Registration Plan is undertaking a major project to rewrite update and modernize the IRP Plan This project is extremely important to all IRP jurisdictions and industry members Recently Ontario attended the Annual IRP Meeting and much of the emphasis and discussions were placed on the Plan Rewrite The 3nd draft of the IRP Plan Rewrite is now available on the IRP Inc website Proposed Ballots 2006 We encourage you to review the proposed Plan Rewrite and provide feedback Since this is such a large undertaking several meetings have taken place with All Jurisdictions represented to review and comment on the Plan Rewrite The progress of the Plan Rewrite project can also be viewed on the IRP Inc website We are providing you with another opportunity to identify and discuss any areas that you may be concerned with and bring your comments forward to us We in turn will coordinate all comments from Ontario and assure that they are brought forward to the Plan Rewrite Committee If you have any comments or concerns regarding the proposed Plan Rewrite please forward your comments to Jackie Zaffino at jackie zaffino ontario ca by August 31 2006 Top of page Change to Frequency of IRP News This is to advise all of our readers that the IRP Newsletter will

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/irp/news/jul06.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Drainage Management Software Reviewed to Date: HY8
    While FHWA and the development team feels these goals and objectives have been largely achieved there were obviously some things that FHWA wanted to change and add in order to take advantage of the more modern Windows operating system This section outlines these changes and new features and will serve as a road map to users who have long used the DOS version of HY 8 The Project File Approach The new version of HY 8 differs from earlier DOS based version in adopting a Project File approach These project files are implemented into the Project Explorer allowing quick selection and application of a specific culvert system2 As described below the addition of this approach adds utility in 1 organizing and applying culvert systems within multiple drainage crossings and 2 during analyses of different design configurations and materials Multiple Drainage Crossings The DOS version of HY 8 only allowed analysis or design of a single drainage crossing While the user could define multiple culverts and barrels systems at this crossing if an overall roadway project included many such crossing sites each would need to be separated into a different input file This led to the proliferation of many separate culvert input files associated with a single roadway project Some practitioners described their confusion in distinguishing which culvert file was associated with which drainage crossing within a project In the new version of HY 8 any number of crossings can be defined within the project file Users now have the option of performing an analysis on several crossings and grouping them together A new mapping feature described below helps the user to create a map identifying each crossing that can be included in their report Of course the Windows version retains older version s ability to consider only a single drainage crossing This single crossing can also still consist of multiple culvert systems e g three circular barrels at one invert system 1 and a box culvert at another invert system 2 at the same roadway crossing Design Alternatives The new version of HY 8 also provides an improved means to consider separate design alternatives of the same crossing within the same project file In the DOS version of HY 8 a user would either have to load them as separate files or make the incremental changes and re evaluate a single file The new version of HY 8 provides the user the option of copying a culvert and associated crossing information With this duplicate crossing the user can make any change s they wish to evaluate The project explorer then makes it easy to toggle back and forth between the alternative crossing designs File Conventions The Windows version of HY 8 saves these Project Files using a HY 8 extension Unlike the DOS version of HY 8 the new version allows any file name format and length allowed by Windows While HY 8 can read in older version INP files to protect this new utility and format files can only be saved using this new format and using the new HY 8 files extension Order of Input The DOS version of HY 8 presented the input as a series of linear sequential input screens The order always began with the discharge followed by the culvert information followed by the tailwater data and ended with the roadway information In the Windows version of HY 8 a single input screen presents all of the input necessary to analyze a single crossing However there are some important subtleties the grouping of the information has been organized into crossing information and the culvert information The discharge tailwater and roadway data are unique to the crossing while the culvert shape inlet conditions and site data define a culvert within the crossing This grouping and therefore subsequent tabbing through the main input screen does not follow the same linear progression of input as the DOS versions of HY 8 Execution of SINGLE and BALANCE The DOS version of HY 8 contained separate analysis functions for computing a culvert performance rating curve SINGLE module and a roadway overtopping analysis BALANCE module that included the effects of all culvert systems within a crossing When running this SINGLE module DOS versions of HY 8 assumed that overtopping was not possible even though roadway data had been defined Additionally in the case were there were multiple culvert systems at the same crossing e g a circular culvert and box culvert relatively side by side the old SINGLE approach provided the performance curve of one of the systems i e circular assuming that the other system i e box was not present One result was users potentially incorrectly applying SINGLE derived performance curve results The Windows version of HY 8 performs all culvert analysis considering hydraulic effects of all culvert systems in the crossing as well as roadway overtopping This means that when you view the performance table or plot for a given culvert within the crossing you are seeing the performance within the context of any other culverts and overtopping of the roadway for the crossing and not just as an isolated culvert If there is only a single culvert system and the roadway is high enough that overtopping does not occur the performance curve of the old and new versions match Front View The Windows version of HY 8 contains an option for displaying the front upstream view elevations of the culvert and roadway at the crossing From a culvert hydraulics and numerical modeling perspective computations do not need to consider the lateral placement of culverts within a crossing Only the elevation relationships between the channel roadway and other culverts are important The information requested in the DOS version HY 8 input screens and input files INP reflected this simpler approach This led to challenges in viewing and plotting these features within the front view area of the updated program Roadway Lateral Stationing To view the scaled relationship between the roadway and culvert system in the front view HY

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/engineering/drainage/software/hy8.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Municipal Drains — Outlet Liability Assessment Factors for MTO Highway Rights of Way
    for highway lands in Ontario The process for calculating the appropriate outlet liability assessment factors for MTO ROW is outlined below The approach for determining the outlet liability assessment factors is based on determining the equivalent hectares multiplication factors for MTO highway ROW compared to the adjacent agricultural land This is done by calculating the percentage of the ROW that is developed then using the table or figure below to determine the outlet liability assessment factor for the applicable local runoff coefficient for adjacent agricultural land The factors presented are for percentage ROW development ranging from 20 to 90 and runoff coefficients of adjacent agricultural land from 0 15 to 0 5 Developed portions include the area covered by asphalt concrete or granular material whereas undeveloped areas include ditches grassed medians and vegetated roadsides Outlet Liability Assessment Factors The table and chart below provide the design values for determining the equivalent land area multiplication factors for MTO highway rights of way Table Outlet Liability Assessment Factors Run off Coefficient for Adjacent Agricultural Land Note C values refer to Background Agricultural run off Coefficient for Watershed ROW Developed C 0 15 C 0 20 C 0 30 C 0 40 C 0 50 20 4 0 3 0 2 0 2 0 1 5 30 4 0 3 0 2 5 2 0 1 5 40 4 5 3 5 2 5 2 0 1 5 50 4 5 3 5 2 5 2 0 1 5 60 5 0 4 0 2 5 2 0 1 5 70 5 5 4 0 2 5 2 0 1 5 80 5 5 4 0 3 0 2 0 1 5 90 6 0 4 5 3 0 2 0 2 0 Design Chart Outlet Liability Assessment Factors Sample Applications for Calculating

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/engineering/drainage/outlet.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Road Talk, Vol. 12, Issue 2
    the tests is insufficient to simulate pavement exposed to Northern Ontario winters There is an absence of a fracture mechanics based test to better identify cracking at extreme cold temperatures and at freeze thaw temperatures These two shortcomings in the PGAC specifications are addressed in the new test protocols developed at Queen s University by the Extended Bending Beam Rheometer BBR test and the Double Edge Notched Tension DENT test The Extended BBR test determines when asphalt will crack if exposed to low temperatures over an extended period of time The DENT test evaluates the ability of asphalt cement to stretch at temperatures ranging from 0 to 20 o C Using both the Extended BBR and the DENT tests lab testing and field monitoring were completed for three sites in Ontario that experienced extensive cracking during their first winter Two of the roads monitored did not involve paving over an existing cracked road while the third site did Therefore the premature cracking at two of the sites could not be attributed to reflective cracking The results of the Extended BBR test from the test sites predicted cracking at higher temperatures than what the current testing protocol expected Overall the study proved the Extended BBR test was able to accurately predict which asphalt binders would perform successfully when exposed to low temperatures Furthermore the data from the test sites confirmed that the longer a pavement is exposed to these conditions the more susceptible some asphalt cements can be to cracking due to the degradation in resistance to low temperature cracking properties These tests will aid in choosing the correct materials for hot mix asphalt paving to produce an economical design prevent asphalt cracking and thus lead to more durable pavements Based on the findings to date additional trials will be constructed and evaluated to assist MTO in developing policies for selecting better performing asphalt materials Major trials are planned to be constructed on Highway 417 in Eastern Region and on Highway 655 in Northeastern Region as Phase II to an earlier trial To read more about Phase I see Road Talk August 2004 Currently MTO is working with samples from several construction contracts constructed last year to see how they are characterized by the newly developed tests This step in creating specifications for future test requirements will also provide insight into crack prevention on materials used in other areas of the province MTO recently invited asphalt suppliers labs to participate in an Extended BBR correlation program to determine the test s variability and repeatability The correlation program provided suppliers a chance to familiarize themselves with the newly published test procedure LS 308 Also DENT testing continues within MTO s laboratory with the goal of refining the procedure from it s current published draft format LS 299 Look for both test procedures in Revision 23 to the Laboratory Testing Manual Search by title on the MTO Research Library Online Catalogue For more information contact Pamela Marks Materials Engineering and Research Office Phone 416 235 3724 E mail pamela marks ontario ca Kai Tam Materials Engineering and Research Office Phone 416 235 3725 E mail kai tam ontario ca Dr Simon Hesp Department of Chemistry Queen s University Phone 613 533 2615 E mail simon chem queensu ca Top of page MTO Answers the Repair Our Air Fleet Challenge Success MTO awarded plaque in Repair Our Air Fleet Challenge Director Malcolm MacLean congratulates Albert Passmore Grant Horton Torben Frederiksen and Mike Levigne for their hard work in the challenge MTO recently took the Repair Our Air Fleet Challenge and succeeded The Repair Our Air Fleet Challenge is an annual program funded by Natural Resources Canada to contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through the promotion of effective fuel management practices Each year private and public sector organizations with large fleets of vehicles take the Repair Our Air Fleet Challenge to reduce fuel consumption by up to 20 through the adoption of best practices of reduced idling Research shows that many vehicle fleets idle 20 60 of their operating time while the most efficient sustained an idling average of 5 10 Idling is harmful to the environment because it contributes to the release of excessive amounts of carbon dioxide into the air which is one of the main Greenhouse Gas emissions GHG adding to the enhanced Greenhouse Effect The Repair Our Air Fleet Challenge promotes reduced idling as the first step towards improved fuel efficiency and the creation of a comprehensive Green Fleet plan With the overall goal of implementing effective fuel management practices in mind the ministry entered eight vehicles in the challenge from around the province Southwest Northeast Eastern and Central regions Each of the participating vehicles was equipped with Global Positioning System GPS based measurement technology provided by Grey Island Systems The measurement technology identifies when the vehicle is idling for longer than 2 minutes after which it starts to record the amount of idle time This record is called a Stop Report and was the main standard used in calculating the vehicles idling averages for the challenge Prior to the challenge the ministry vehicles entered in the competition maintained a promising idling average of 16 20 However over the four month long challenge MTO staff succeeded at reducing the idling average to an impressive 4 and maintained that average throughout the program despite winter temperatures MTO Fleet Co ordinator Torben Frederiksen accepted an award from Natural Resources Canada on behalf of MTO and the regional participants Furthermore Central Region MTO Fleet Challenge leaders Grant Horton and Albert Passmore with the support of Mike Levigne Head of Fleet Services in Central Region maintained an amazing idling average of less than 1 throughout the entire challenge Malcolm MacLean Director of the Construction and Operations Branch presented both Horton and Passmore with certificates of excellence and sincere congratulations for their outstanding accomplishments Special thanks to all of the regional participants for their contributions to MTO s success in meeting this challenge

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transtek/roadtalk/rt12-2/ (2014-08-11)
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