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  • Road Talk, Vol 17, Issue 4
    information overload in the network that could occur if every vehicle received and transmitted wireless information They are also developing smart device applications The University of Waterloo is studying the relationship between electric vehicles and Intelligent Transportation Systems to identify ways to manage the transportation system while maximizing opportunities for green vehicles The University of Toronto is continuing to evolve cloud computing which provides on demand data through a computer network To do this the University is investigating ways to manage communications and computing platforms that Connected Vehicles will use Carleton University is developing a cognitive vehicle research program focussed on how to best deliver information to drivers without overwhelming them Wilfrid Laurier University is examining the business implications of the Connected Vehicle by conducting a preliminary assessment of the opportunities requirements and stakeholder impact of commercializing the Connected Vehicle concept McMaster University is studying the implications of the Connected Vehicle for future transportation management As the Connected Vehicle concept could begin to be used to manage road networks within the next five years changes to Ontario university curricula could be needed to prepare future graduates The Ontario Advantage Ontario has a long record of using innovation to address transportation challenges starting with the first traffic signal control systems and more recently the world s first high speed non stop fully electronic tolling system on Highway 407 MTO has developed several industry first applications and services related to the COMPASS freeway management system including managing congestion across the express and collector lanes on Highway 401 Along with a history of innovation Ontario is a leader in the automotive software industry wireless communications digital media and mobile web applications Ontario also has strong technical skills and a multiculturalsociety with global connections MTO anticipates global community interest in the Kanata Connected Vehicle test bed which will promote Ontario business and academia to world markets Looking Ahead Using Ontario as the test bed to evaluate the software products in a real life environment is the last piece in the Connected Vehicle s development cycle A survey of Networked Vehicle Association members in the telecommunications and automotive sectors indicates strong interest in the test bed National and international corporations recognize the value of Connected Vehicle technology and have indicated that the technology developed in Ontario has potential for a global market Ontario Companies developing Connected Vehicle related Software G4 Apps Inc an Ontario company based in Oakville is working on applications including real time collision avoidance warning of traffic signal violations and predicting the wait time at border crossings based on real time information from vehicles approaching or waiting at the border G4 Apps provides these services today on smartphones and is engaged with automobile manufacturers for inclusion in vehicles systems This video demonstrates an in vehicle system notifying a driver of real time traffic delays before the driver reaches the overhead messaging sign on the highway Videos used with permission from G4 2011 This video demonstrates how in vehicle systems can communicate between vehicles and identify hazardous conditions This in vehicle system detects the stopped vehicle ahead and based on road conditions and relative vehicles speeds provides increasing levels of alerts to the driver as they enter different hazard zones depicted by the coloured lines Video demonstrating adaptive speed control A car from the right lane swerves in front of a car in the passing left lane As this occurs the car behind is slowed down by its in vehicle monitoring system to increase the space between it and the other vehicle The left screen is an animation showing what this would look like on a highway The right screen is a controlled demonstration with real vehicles using a car sitting on a dynamometer while other vehicles are overtaking it This video used with permission from TNO 2011 The Waterloo Ontario based company Intelligent Mechatronic Systems Inc specializes in the research development and production of innovative and progressive solutions in the areas of automotive safety telematics and mobile media The company s solutions include iLane an in vehicle platform that provides drivers with hands free access to on demand content and time sensitive information Prompt a voice activated dispatch solution that enables taxi and limousine drivers to conduct their job entirely hands free via simple voice commands such as sign in receive job information accept decline jobs and provide estimated time of arrival information and DriveSync a turn key telematics platform which enables a variety of solutions including usage based insurance offerings fleet monitoring vehicle tracking and government programs For more information on connected vehicle activities and other companies in this field please refer to ConnectedVehicle ca For more information please contact Stephen Erwin Head Intelligent Transportation Systems Policy Planning and Programming and Networked Vehicle Test Bed Research Chair at 416 235 4676 or at Stephen Erwin ontario ca Top of page Keep that Train a Rollin Rapid Removal of Railway Bridge in Northwestern Ontario On August 18 2010 the Ministry of Transportation MTO removed an aging Canadian Pacific Railway CPR three span bridge in ten hours The accelerated operations accommodated a CPR condition to have their east west rail line shut down for no more than 12 consecutive hours The former bridge site is located about 40 km east of Kenora on an abandoned section of Highway 17 part of the Trans Canada Highway that passes through northwestern Ontario Realigned section of Highway 17 over the railway prior to the railway bridge demolition A deteriorating Canadian Pacific Railway bridge built in 1935 crossed over Highway 17 prior to the construction of the new alignment For the last 75 years Highway 17 has passed under the CPR bridge Its low overhead clearance of 4 9 m imposed a significant constraint on the movement of loads by over height transport carriers This constraint was removed during the 2008 realignment of Highway 17 when MTO constructed a new 2 2 km section of highway over the CPR mainline providing an opportunity to remove the deteriorating railway bridge In 2007 MTO and CPR began negotiations for the removal of the old three span bridge CPR personnel expressed concerns about economic impacts to their business resulting from an extended closure of east west mainline rail traffic during removal To avoid a long closure the ministry proposed a rapid lift strategy to remove the railway bridge In 2008 after shifting Highway 17 traffic to the new alignment MTO began planning the removal of the old railway bridge This extensive planning culminated in the preparation of a tender package by Thunder Bay Testing Engineering Ltd In May 2010 a contract was awarded to Sacchetti Construction Limited of Thunder Bay To prepare the work site prior to demolition day the contractor built granular pads for the removal cranes placed and compacted granular material under the bridge and removed a portion of the bridge under the siding parallel to the mainline track The contractor submitted a change proposal for improvements to the hoisting logistics that resulted in more efficient operations and savings of about 84 000 CPR railway tracks back in place and final clean up in progress Removing the centre span of the railway bridge with an 800 ton crane On the morning of August 18 2010 a complete shutdown of all train traffic commenced for removal of the railway bridge By 9 40 a m the CPR work crew removed sections of track over the bridge the ministry contractor then started demolition operations Excavators with hoe rams broke the concrete bridge at the supports an 800 ton crane then lifted the centre section As soon as it was removed two large loaders placed and a vibratory roller compacted granular material until the final rail bed elevation was reached at all three sections of the bridge At 2 30 p m the CPR crew positioned the track placed three rail car loads of ballast rock and levelled the rails with specialized equipment Ten hours after the last train had passed over the CPR bridge the railroad was ready for train traffic again a full two hours ahead of schedule This achievement is attributed to the extensive planning and co ordination among all parties involved in this challenging project MTO has carried out many successful large and small rapid lift operations including rapid replacements on several large scale accelerated bridge construction projects on the Ottawa Queensway with successful completions in 15 to 17 hour overnight operations Similarly the ministry has gained experience using rapid lift strategies on rural low volume bridges completing full replacement operations in less than four hours Rapid bridge replacement and prefabrication technology have saved millions of dollars and years in construction time across Ontario For more information please contact Gary Weiss Area Contracts Engineer Operations Northwestern Region at 807 473 2015 or gary weiss ontario ca Dave McColl Manager Operations Northwestern Region at 807 473 2118 or dave mccoll ontario ca Top of page Two is Better than One Hot on Hot An Innovative Asphalt Paving Technology The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO is always looking for new and innovative technologies to improve the quality of our provincial highways One such innovative technology is integral Hot Mix Asphalt HMA also referred to as Hot on Hot paving which MTO implemented on a trial contract this year The conventional method of paving is to place single layers of hot mix with tack coat sprayed between the courses to promote bonding Hot on Hot paving is a road paving technology that places two layers of hot mix asphalt almost simultaneously This reduces the duration of construction closures alleviating construction delays It also enables the placement of a thinner layer of the top course which lessens the demand for higher quality surface course aggregates Through the use of a single thick lift there is opportunity to extend the paving season as a thicker asphalt layer has better heat retention and layer bonding to facilitate paving at cooler temperatures Most importantly based on the results of past projects Hot on Hot has the potential to provide extended pavement life and reduce potholes since the surface course is interlocked into the underlying binder course without the need for a tack coat application between the layers Fewer traffic delays are anticipated to reduce greenhouse gas emissions energy use and societal costs This technology supports the ministry s strategic directions to have the greenest roads in North America and deliver our business in innovative and improved ways Hot on Hot paving results in spending fewer construction dollars on traffic control more on pavements and bridges Currently there are two different Hot on Hot technologies available Compactasphalt by Dynapac Figure 1 and InLine Pave by Wirtgen Figure 2 These technolog ies are slightly different Dynapac s Compactasphalt involves a single specialized paver with two hoppers and two compaction screeds Wirtgen s InLine Pave uses two separate pavers and a specialised conveyance system to place the two lifts of hot mix in one operation Figure 1 Dynapac s Compactasphalt System Reproduced from www Compactasphalt com Figure 2 Wirtgen s InLine Pave System Reproduced from www inlinepave info Benefits of Hot on Hot The potential benefits of using Hot on Hot include Potential cost savings as a reduction in the surface course thickness conserves premium aggregates Improved pavement quality due to a better interface bond between layers Figure 3 Reduced closure times and traffic delays Energy savings and fewer greenhouse gases Potential to extend the paving season due to the better heat retention of a thick mat Hot on Hot paving has been used extensively in Europe since the first projects using Hot on Hot technology were constructed in Germany in 1995 A test section was paved in 2006 on the NCAT pavement test track in the United States and is reported to be performing well This technology is completely new to Canada and the MTO s trial was the first ever done in North America on a public road Ontario s First Experience with Hot on Hot The ministry conducted its first Hot on Hot trial in a 2011 contract to repave a section of Highway 12 through Midland The contract consisted of two depths of Hot on Hot one 90 mm 30 on 60 and the other 140 mm 30 on 110 and involved several different underlying pavement treatments Figure 3 Interface between Layers of Hot on Hot Pavement The contract permitted the use of any recognized Hot on Hot system and the contractor K J Beamish selected the Compactasphalt system by Dynapac K J Beamish sent crew members to Germany in order to observe the system in action Dynapac then shipped the equipment over to Canada as well as provided an experienced German crew to facilitate training The Compactasphalt paving train consists of five pieces of equipment At the centre is the paver which is essentially two pavers in one The bottom paver lays the binder course and the module on top places the surface course The paver can be used for conventional paving simply by removing this module The Material Transfer Vehicle charges the binder course mix into a 31 tonne bottom hopper then repositions and charges a 17 tonne hopper on the paver module with surface course mix The paver then uses two synchronized screeds to place the binder course followed by the surface course A small wide static roller is used to stabilize the two lifts before standard rollers provide the final compaction Figures 4 and 5 show the equipment in operation at the contract site The initial contract design was for Hot on Hot paving throughout the contract limits except for a small section of mill and pave 50 mm The design was changed to conventional paving at the intersections tapers and ramps to accommodate the limitations of the Hot on Hot paver s turning radius During construction localized soft substrate was discovered that raised concerns due to the weight of the big paver Therefore a 50 mm base layer was paved conventionally prior to a 90 mm 40 on 50 Hot on Hot layer Additionally it was found that the heat retention of the thick mat delayed opening the road to traffic Compaction of the two combined lifts is new to MTO Therefore several cores have been taken to determine the density profile as well as to examine the interface bond and structure Since the two layers are paved simultaneously the longitudinal joints cannot be staggered as in conventional paving So cores were also taken at the joints to visually assess joint quality Figure 5 Charging the Binder Course Figure 4 Wide Paving Operation 8 0 metres To introduce and promote the use of Hot on Hot paving across Ontario a Pave in was held September 21st 2011 by K J Beamish Dynapac the Ontario Hot Mix Producers Association and MTO Attendees included representatives from the ministry the Association and invited guests Future Plans The ministry will continue to learn from the experience of this trial contract by monitoring its performance Examination and testing of the cores will provide more information about the compaction aspect of this process On the radar for MTO is to develop a protocol for determining the mix temperature so that the roadway can be opened to traffic as early as possible with the possible consideration of Warm Mix Asphalt to reduce the required cooling time Given the various benefits of Hot on Hot paving the ministry will continue to evaluate the information obtained from this demonstration project and pursue future opportunities for using the Hot on Hot technology For more information please contact Heather Beattie Engineer in Training Bituminous Section Highway Standards Branch at 416 235 4678 or at Heather E Beattie Ontario ca OR Anil Virani Senior Bituminous Engineer Bituminous Section Highway Standards Branch at 416 235 3723 or at Anil Virani Ontario ca Top of page A Fan of Savings Improvements to Thorold Tunnel Ventilation and Alert Systems The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO owns and operates two tunnels as part of the provincial highway network The Thorold Tunnel on Highway 58 is one such facility with four lanes travelling 84 km under the Welland Canal in the City of Thorold in Niagara About 24 300 vehicles daily pass through the Thorold Tunnel maintaining an uninterrupted flow of both canal and land traffic The Thorold Tunnel was built between 1965 and 1967 and until now has relied on mechanical ventilation to remove traffic generated fumes including Carbon Monoxide CO Until recently powerful fans were used to ventilate the tunnel for up to 18 hours every day to assure air quality However tunnel staff experienced ongoing maintenance and reliability issues due to the constant wear and tear to the fans as well as tunnel environmental conditions that corroded the air quality units In 2009 the Thorold Tunnel crew solved these ongoing maintenance issues through upgrading the tunnel s CO monitoring and smoke detection systems which trigger fan operation only when required This upgrade has resulted in significant energy savings not part of the original plan to acquire more reliable detection systems In preparation for new detection systems the crew conducted monitoring tests to determine the present CO levels in the tunnel while the fans were in operation and while they were powered off Unexpectedly the results from both monitoring scenarios showed CO levels were 0 ppm regardless of traffic volume The tunnel CO levels did not change unless the traffic was slowed or stopped in both lanes suggesting that air quality in the Thorold Tunnel is dependent on traffic volume and speed Air is pulled into the tunnel by traffic pulled along with traffic and exits with traffic resulting in a continuous flow of air in the direction of traffic The air flow and amount increases with the number and size of the vehicles travelling through the tunnel After determining CO levels the Thorold Tunnel crew began to consider an upgrade of the detection systems that would also minimize the use of fans

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transtek/roadtalk/rt17-4/index.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Road Talk, Vol 17, Issue 3
    BluFax Traffic Monitoring unit with the case open In 2009 an Ontario law was enacted that banned the use of hand held devices while driving creating a corresponding increase in the use of hands free Bluetooth technology With greater use of Bluetooth new devices have been developed that pull information from Bluetooth active vehicles One such example is the BluFax Bluetooth Traffic Monitoring unit with BluStats software In 2010 the Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO was the first in Canada to deploy these units for traffic delay compliance monitoring Allowable traffic delays are included in the Performance Specifications of MTO s new Design Build Contracts which describe the maximum length of time a contractor may delay traffic travelling though a construction zone What is Bluetooth Bluetooth is a proprietary telecommunications industry specification for the interconnection of digital devices through short range wireless communications A common example of Bluetooth technology is the interconnection of a mobile phone with a wireless earpiece to permit hands free driving Every Bluetooth device has a transceiver chip which continuously transmits a unique 48 bit ID to establish a link with responding devices This is called an inquiry mode which a Bluetooth transceiver carries out even while it is already engaged in communication with another device All equipped and activated devices transmit inquiries as long as their discovery mode is enabled Bluetooth information is exchanged within a globally available frequency band of 2 45 GHz and transmission ranges include 10m for a Class 2 and 100m for Class 1 devices In some devices these ranges may be increased through appropriate adjustments to receiver sensitivity and device placement Bluetooth Traffic Monitoring The increased popularity of Bluetooth devices along with the continuous and long range transmission of their transceiver IDs facilitates a new way to gather traffic data MTO has recently been testing and deploying the BlueFax system to collect data and analyze it with BluStats software The system collects traffic data through two or more traffic monitoring units located on a freeway in proximity to the roadway Desired locations for deployment of BluFax devices includes mounting the devices to a secure elevated location in the right of way such as utility poles truck inspection stations or existing Advanced Traffic Management System equipment sites or cabinets since mounting height and an unobstructed signal path improve detection range The BluFax devices are equipped with a Class 1 transceiver with a transmission range of about 100m which will detect traffic travelling in both directions on a divided freeway In its most basic form the technology calculates travel times by matching public Bluetooth wireless network IDs at successive detection stations Recorded time difference of the ID matches provides an accurate measure of travel time and an average speed based on the distance between the successive stations The distance between successive data collection stations is measured using GPS equipment installed in the BluFax units that record location as a header record for the collected data Travel Time Monitoring via Bluetooth technology Every BluFax unit is equipped with a 12v 30Ah gel cell battery and operates continuously for about 12 days Data is stored on a microSD chip which can later be removed for data retrieval The units continue to record data until the battery voltage drops to the shut down point The units are then physically removed and taken back to the office for recharging and downloading of the microSD chip data In field downloading is possible through the use of a non networked Laptop or Netbook BluStats Software 1 Once data from the BluFax units has been downloaded it can be processed by BluStats analysis software which presents the data for users as follows Loads archives and processes all sensor data in a graphical user friendly interface Matches Bluetooth ID address between designated pairs of sensor stations applying robust statistical base filtering for the flagging and removal of outliers and other anomalous data Summarizes travel time data statistically in five minute time intervals Provides input for additional attributes associated with the sensor stations as well as matched sensor pairs or segments Outputs kml based files a file format used to display geographical data for easy review of sensor locations and attributes Provides graphical displays of travel time speed and detection rates and All data either from sensor stations or travel time on designated segments can be written to standard comma separated ASCII data files that can be easily imported into MS Excel spreadsheets and data bases Travel time graphs BLUSTATS graphic output displaying traffic travel time mean speed and BluFax sensor detection rate on Highway 400 northbound before during and after detours for MTO s demolition of the old King Road Bridge in York Region north of Toronto The orange rectangles superimposed on the two graphical outputs indicate the period during which the northbound lanes were closed and all traffic was detoured Reading left to right the green line shows travel time with an initial peak as traffic was diverted onto the detour for the first time As traffic volumes lessened vehicle travel times decreased The light blue line shows vehicle speeds as they travelled through the construction zone The dark blue graph shows the number of blue tooth detections in five minute intervals MTO s Use of BluFax for Traffic Delay Compliance Monitoring In the spring of 2010 the ministry was the first in Canada to deploy BluFax units to monitor traffic for compliance of a Design Build contract Two units were set up in the right of way on Highway 8 3km in each direction from the site of the Fairchild Creek culvert replacement project Site of the Fairchild Creek culvert replacement project where BluFax Traffic Monitoring units were deployed Construction on the Fairchild Creek culvert began in August 2010 The BluFax units were deployed in mid June to allow for possible placement and equipment issues For two weeks prior to the culvert construction data was collected to establish a baseline travel time and speed profile This data was

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transtek/roadtalk/rt17-3/index.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Road Talk, Vol 17, Issue 2
    construction of the Madawaska River Bridge twin span as part of the expansion Twinning the bridge presented the ministry with unique challenges due to the length of the bridge the ability to transport its fabricated sections its proximity to the Ontario Power Generating OPG station near Arnprior and its location in Ontario s highest seismic zone Structural Details of the Madawaska Bridge Twinning The existing bridge structure is a three span concrete deck on steel I girders The twin was designed to match the original bridge both structurally and aesthetically Similarly its pier footings are located on the shore of the Madawaska River s wide watercourse Construction began in summer 2009 and will be completed by the summer of 2011 The resulting structure is a three span concrete deck on haunched steel I girders with a main span of 130 m and end spans of 90 m for a total length of 310 m The length of the main span places this bridge in the top twenty longest spans in the world for bridges of this type Bridge Size Transportability and Structural Fatigue Considerations Typically to establish the depth of haunched I girders a span to depth ratio of 20 is used at the piers and 40 at the mid span Following this formula the resulting girder depths would have measured 6 5 m at the pier and 3 25 m at mid span Transportation of the haunched segments of the girders to the site after manufacturing was impossible by any standard means Consequently the Ministry reduced the depth to 5 5 m at the piers and 2 9 m at mid span giving the fabricator the option to transport these girders by railroad in a vertical position Reducing girder depths usually results in higher fatigue stress ranges due to live loads To satisfy the structural requirements and to avoid the fatigue issues MTO consulted with a number of fabricators and decided to bolt rather than weld all the gusset plates connecting the structure s diaphragms and wind bracing Seismic Considerations The new site also presented the MTO design team with the unique challenge of being located in a seismic zone With a rating of 4 and an associated zonal acceleration ratio of 0 2g this area has the highest seismic rating in Ontario Typically provisions are made to allow a structure to expand and contract as required due to effects such as creep shrinkage and temperature changes This is accomplished by restraining the movement at the pier closest to the point of the theoretical zero movement while allowing longitudinal movement to occur freely over the remaining supports At the ends of the bridge the longitudinal movements are accommodated with expansion joints For the Madawaska River Bridge the large vertical reaction eliminated the option to use standard laminated elastomeric bearings at the piers Pot bearings would have accommodated the loads and thermal movements but would not absorb any longitudinal earthquake loads Seismic Isolation During the analysis of the Madawaska Bridge structure the various factors specified in the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code were combined with the zonal acceleration ratio to define the structure s response spectrum A dynamic analysis of a three dimensional computer model was then carried out and seismic responses were obtained These responses showed that the horizontal forces transferred to the substructure were extremely large and could not be practically and economically accommodated Based on the results of the analysis ministry staff determined that seismic isolation would be used Seismic isolation accomplishes a number of objectives It distributes the horizontal forces to multiple substructure elements dissipates energy through increased damping and most importantly lengthens the natural period of the structure moving it to a much less damaging part of the response spectrum Water work Challenges Adhering to Department of Fisheries Ontario Power Generation and Ministry of Natural Resources time restrictions and dates for in water work brought further challenges during assembly of the Madawaska River Bridge girder segments To reduce the number of requests made to Ontario Power Generation to allow no flow conditions during construction MTO s contractor Thomas Cavanaugh Construction Limited developed an innovative assembly scheme to field splice the entire 97 m mid section of the structure on a nearby barge For installation of the mid section the barge was manoeuvred into place so that the entire mid section could be jacked up in one continuous operation This method has not been used anywhere else on a bridge section of this size Construction and Expansion to Date The bridge structure has been completed with the exception of the deck scheduled for completion this spring The bridge will open to vehicles in the summer of 2011 At that time MTO will then begin rehabilitation of the east bound bridge When fully completed the bridges will feature fixed automated spray technology FAST to prevent the formation of frost and or ice on the bridge surface during winter months Twinning of Highway 17 from a two lane undivided highway to a four lane divided freeway will move Ontarians safely reliably and sustainably For more information please contact Nicolas C Theodor Head Standards Engineer Bridge Office at 905 643 6960 or at Nicolas Theodor Ontario ca Ken Polson Area Contracts Engineer Contracts Office at 613 748 5274 or at Ken Polson ontario ca Tim Lynch Contract Services Administrator Contracts Office at 613 433 3508 or at Tim Lynch ontario ca Top of page Cooling Off by Getting Warm Warm Mix Asphalt A Greener Alternative to Hot Mix Asphalt Figure 1 Thermal imaging of HMA left and WMA right during paving Note the 28 7 C drop in average temperature The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO has a strong history of research development and implementation of innovative pavement technologies One recent initiative is Warm Mix Asphalt WMA which MTO first trialed in 2008 Warm Mix Asphalt is defined as a group of technologies which allow for a reduction in the temperatures at which asphalt mixtures are produced and placed

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transtek/roadtalk/rt17-2/index.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Road Talk, Vol 17, Issue 1
    worker protection First used by MTO on a project on Highway 115 the Mobile Traffic Barrier continues to impress contractors and staff in several ministries because of its ease and speed of set up compared with conventional work zone protection equipment such as temporary concrete barriers To minimize disruption to Highway 401 traffic two of the three westbound lanes were closed on a nightly basis to complete the repairs on the Dingman Drive Bridge The Mobile Traffic Barrier was removed each morning opening all lanes during peak traffic hours The collaborative relationship between ministry staff consultant and contractors contributed to the successful implementation of new innovations for the repairs The suite of innovative techniques was well matched to the repair project s needs and improved repair timelines Also the use of these innovations significantly reduced costs when compared to full girder replacement For further information please contact Andrew Turnbull Senior Structural Engineer at 519 873 4341 or at Andrew Turnbull ontario ca or Wade Young Head Structural Section at 519 873 4337 or at Wade Young ontario ca Top of page Save Your Money Rapid Bridge Replacement with a Smaller Price Tag The original bridge at Bass Lake required replacement Removal of the old bridge at Bass Lake The finished pre fabricated bridge in place at Bass Lake Ontario is a province of greatly varying transportation needs from high density urban areas with the busiest freeway in North America to small rural settlements with extremely low volume roads As of late the Ministry of Transportation MTO has been successful in bringing large scale rapid bridge replacement to its freeways Similarly over the last few years but perhaps less heralded the ministry has been trialing rapid replacement of small bridges on rural low volume roads Bass Lake Bridge near Sault Ste Marie and part of the Aberdeen and McMahon Local Roads Board is one example of success in rapid bridge replacement in a rural setting Bass Lake Bridge sits along a modest gravel road that represents the sole route connecting 25 local residents to other communities The original replacement plan for the bridge included three months to construct a new rigid concrete structure a temporary detour and a price tag of 1 3 million Given the road s low daily traffic average of 100 vehicles per day ministry staff chose to investigate less expensive options Subsequent to further discussions and field investigations MTO staff selected a pre fabricated low profile full loading all steel structure as a suitable and less costly alternative Replacement of the Bass Lake Bridge was completed in a straightforward four hour installation process on October 28 2009 After removal of the old structure workers installed engineered pre fabricated concrete footings at either end to support the new structure and the granular grade was raised approximately one metre to match the elevation of the new bridge A rented crane was used to lift and place the pre fabricated all steel structure on bearing pads Workers then assembled and affixed the new structure Lastly they installed the steel beam guide rail on the approaches and used the prefabricated steel pockets on the sides of the bridge deck to hold the guide rail posts further simplifying the installation and decreasing installation time Pre fabricated replacement of the Bass Lake Bridge had several significant benefits compared with the conventional replacement originally planned Inconvenience to local residents was minimal as the total road closure lasted twelve hours rather than three months and no detour was required There was little environmental impact because the bridge was dropped into place and avoided in water work Due to its pre fabrication future refurbishment of the bridge will entail simply removing it for repairs and then placing it back again afterwards Perhaps most impressively this method of replacement produced incredible savings compared with the conventional replacement planned With all labour materials and traffic control costs included the pre fabricated bridge cost just under 145 000 close to one tenth of the original cost Careful community consultation during the Bass Lake Bridge replacement spurred Chief Alfred Bisaillon from the Thessalon First Nation to send a letter of thanks to MTO In his letter Chief Bisaillon wrote Throughout the process of the replacement of the Bass Lake Road Bridge we have found the Ministry to be cognizant of its obligation to consult Thessalon First Nation at every stage of the development Ministry experience to date with pre fabricated bridge replacement for low volume roads has been very encouraging The success of the Bass Lake Bridge and other rural pre fabricated bridge installations has prompted MTO to install to date approximately one dozen low volume road as well as numbered highway bridge replacements using this method Continuing adoption of this technology could generate considerable savings for the ministry in managing its responsibility for approximately 150 small rural bridges With thousands more municipally owned low volume road bridges across Ontario a wider adoption of pre fabricated bridge technology could potentially save the province hundreds of millions of dollars in addition to improving service to rural citizens and the environment For further information please contact Roger Bangs Senior Municipal Supervisor Northeast Region at 705 945 6663 or at Roger Bangs ontario ca Top of page How to Recycle 400 000 Tires Shredded Rubber Tires for Highway Embankment Fill Schematic cross section of the TDA embankment fill Typical tire shreds Planned TDA fill placement at the Boundary Road interchange on Highway 401 in Cornwall Each year in Ontario about 12 million scrap rubber tires are generated many of which are dumped or stockpiled within Ontario creating considerable pollution and trash potential fire hazards and breeding grounds for West Nile Virus Yet scrap tires represent an opportunity when it is appropriately re used or recycled The Ministry of Transportation MTO has experience using recycled scrap tires in asphalt but the number of tires used in this process is only a partial solution to the disposal of waste tires Larger volumes of scrap tires can be used to develop Tire Derived Aggregate TDA an alternative to earth fill in the construction of highway embankments MTO will be demonstrating the use of TDA on a bridge replacement at the Boundary Road interchange on Highway 401 in Cornwall This project alone will recycle approximately 400 000 scrap tires TDA is produced by feeding scrap tires into a mechanical shredding machine where sharp rotating blades shear them into strips 50 300 millimetres long On average this machine can produce five to ten tonnes of TDA per hour To build a TDA embankment the tire shreds are placed in layers 300 millimetres thick and then compacted by a 10 tonne roller The compacted TDA layers are then encapsulated within a geotextile blanket and covered with 2 metres of soil While TDA takes longer to construct than earth fill the environmental benefits are obvious large volumes of used tires are diverted from landfill and stockpiles and at the same time comparable volumes of non renewable aggregates are spared from consumption Furthermore material quality is not compromised The following characteristics of TDA enhance its performance as fill when compared to traditional materials Lightweight at about one third of the compacted dry density of typical soil approximately 0 8 tonnes m3 TDA is less likely to settle Good thermal insulation with about seven to eight times the thermal resistance of granular soil it limits frost penetration beneath roads Highly permeable with good drainage qualities Compressible with good vibration absorption Lower lateral pressures on retaining walls as low as half that of conventional soil backfill Non biodegradable Suitable applications for TDA must consider its potential for combustibility as well as its potential for affecting water quality through leachate a concern in places where wells are used Past concerns that high TDA fills could self combust have been addressed in the ASTM technical standard D6270 08 for use of TDA which restricts layer thickness to three metres Since the mid 1990s there have been over 100 TDA fills constructed in North America with a maximum thickness of three metres and with no evidence of self heating Based on laboratory and field studies conducted to support ASTM D6270 08 TDA placed above the groundwater table is expected to have a negligible off site effect on water quality TDA technology is new to MTO but has been used elsewhere in North America and Europe TDA has been successfully used as engineered fill in other jurisdictions since the early 1990 s including several states in the U S and recently in the province of New Brunswick However due to regulatory barriers scrap tires have not yet been used as fill for highway construction in Ontario In advance of the Cornwall trial project MTO staff visited St Stephen New Brunswick in September 2009 to learn about TDA technology from Department of Transportation colleagues In St Stephen the Province of New Brunswick has constructed a new four lane section of Route 1 with highway embankments using approximately 1 4 million scrap tires In fall 2010 MTO and the contractor AECON began work on the Boundary Road Interchange with construction on the TDA embankments to be completed in 2011 The Boundary Road Interchange was determined to be a favourable location for the TDA trial embankments given The subsurface and groundwater conditions are favourable There are no issues regarding embankment stability and settlement The site is not an environmentally sensitive area The TDA embankments are being built on a secondary roadway The site is situated in close proximity to a TDA processing plant The schedule for the project was favourable for construction commencing in 2010 2011 The project permitted sufficient quantities of TDA that would enable approximately 400 000 tires to be shredded A new alignment meant replacing the interchange bridge necessitating large volumes of embankment fill At the same time the embankment would be built on the Boundary Road portion without impact to the traffic on Highway 401 The location itself is close to a registered TDA processor the Moose Creek Tire Processing Facility is less than 100 kilometres away on Highway 138 There were no existing foundation issues present at the Boundary Road site and with very few domestic wells there was little risk to residents water quality MTO has been working with the Ministry of Environment to ensure adherence to environmental legislation regulations and policies and to identify and implement the necessary environmental risk mitigation strategies Since used tires are a designated waste in Ontario MTO required a certificate of approval from the Ministry of Environment to place TDA at the Boundary Road site During and following construction MTO will conduct engineering and environmental monitoring to ensure acceptable engineering performance and protection of the natural environment as well as examine the benefits of using TDA as a recycled engineered material for highway embankment construction Groundwater monitoring wells were installed on site in November 2010 and pre construction baseline groundwater and surface water quality monitoring has commenced Also MTO will monitor TDA settlements and internal temperature of the TDA layers Based on the results of this trial project MTO will consider other sites and applications for use of TDA as a recycled engineered material in Ontario Use of TDA recycled from scrap tire waste has received enthusiastic support from both the Ontario Tire Stewardship an agency responsible for developing programs that divert scrap tires from waste towards repurposed uses and the Rubber Association of Canada The significance of this type of project in growing a market for scrap tires cannot be understated Uptake of this technology on a broader provincial scale at 10 embankments per year for instance could divert about one quarter to one third of the scrap tires Ontario now generates annually For further information please contact David Staseff Foundations Engineer at 416 235 4073 or at David Staseff ontario ca or Tony Sangiuliano Foundations Engineer at 416 235 5267 or at Tony J Sangiuliano ontario ca Top of page Another Contract Model for the Toolbox The Construction Manager General Contractor Model for Provincial Highways An illustration of the CMGC process The Ontario Ministry of Transportation with input from the Ontario Road Builders Association and the Consulting Engineers of Ontario has recently developed the procurement documents for the Construction Manager General Contractor CMGC model The CMGC pilot project was advertised to the construction industry January 13th 2011 CMGC is a construction procurement model currently used in the United States In Canada it has been utilized in the vertical building industry but has not yet been used in highway construction in Ontario or Canada The foundation of this model is the creation of a mutually beneficial relationship among a design consultant contractor and owner or road authority While creating a teamwork environment in the design and construction of a highway project ensures quality and value to the owner it is also a key component of this delivery method This model is unique as it uses the expertise of the contractor through the design stage and into construction There are many advantages to this alternative contract delivery model allowing the owner to remain in control accelerating project delivery reducing project risk and allowing for project flexibility Another key benefit of this model is its ability to encourage contractor and owner innovation through the use of new construction technologies or materials In addition the model allows for ongoing constructability reviews throughout the design and mitigates project issues while allowing for appropriate risk ownership through the spirit of collaboration According to U S agencies using this model contractor input during preconstruction has reduced design costs by decreasing the amount of design work required and the early focus on constructible solutions The CMGC model consists of two phases The first is an open and competitive process where a contractor is selected to provide input into the design as a Construction Manager through a Request for Proposal process The second phase is the construction contract where the contractor will become the General Contractor if they provide a suitable bid for the construction work If the Ministry does not accept the contractor s bid for the construction work the Ministry would tender the contract package resulting from the model and award using traditional procedures It is anticipated that the CMGC pilot will be a beneficial addition to the ministry s toolbox of project delivery models Stay tuned for a future article on the outcome of the CMGC pilot For further information please contact Neil Zohorsky Contract Innovations Engineer Contracts Innovations Office at 613 545 4775 or at Neil Zohorsky ontario ca Top of page Quiet on the Set Quiet Asphalt Pavement Trials for Highway Noise Reduction Test sections are located on Highway 405 The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO continues to examine innovative highway materials and technologies with the potential to decrease environmental impacts One such example is quiet pavement MTO has been testing certain mixes of asphalt pavement specifically designed to reduce tire pavement noise which also have other benefits including reduced tire spray due to rain or wet snow on the road surface Tire pavement noise is an important issue for highway agencies and noise barriers are used as a typical solution Many factors contribute to highway noise during tire pavement interaction including tire size and condition vehicle type load and speed traffic volume pavement porosity and pavement surface texture To evaluate the effect of various mixes in reducing tire pavement noise levels MTO conducted trials of Quiet asphalt on five sections of Highway 405 near St Catharines in October 2009 Post construction pavement noise measurements were performed on each section using the ON Board Sound Intensity method which measures noise levels using a sound intensity probe The test sections were measured by driving five vehicle mounted ON Board Sound Intensity devices simultaneously across the test area three times at speeds of 60 km h 80 km h and 100 km h MTO obtained at least 2 valid measurements per test section ASTM E2380 test procedures were also applied using an outflow meter to measure pavement permeability and to provide an indicator of its porosity within the test sections Good correlation exists between the pavement permeability determined by outflow meter and the noise level measured using the ON Board Sound Intensity method The five test sections consist of Section A three layers of asphalt a double open graded mix layer placed over Superpave 19 0 binder course mix The double open graded mix layer is made of a single lift of Open Friction Course containing polymer fibre modified Performance Grade Asphalt Cement combined with another lift of an intermediate HL4 Open Binder Course Section B an open friction course containing polymer fibre modified Performance Grade Asphalt Cement placed over Superpave 19 0 binder course Section C a rubber modified semi wet process Open Friction Course containing 1 ground rubber placed over Superpave 19 0 binder course Section D Stone Mastic Asphalt containing 9 5 mm nominal maximum size aggregate placed over Superpave 19 0 binder course Section E Control Section Superpave 12 5 friction course FC2 surface course placed over Superpave 19 0 binder course Results to date show that Section A the double layer open graded mix was consistently the quietest at all speeds followed by the single layer rubberized open graded mix in Section C In addition noise levels on Section C was at least 2 dBA less than the conventional single open graded mix in Section B proving the rubber is able to reduce noise Based on the initial test results of noise and flow meter measurements MTO has concluded The noise reduction potential of open graded mix can be further enhanced by using a rubberized asphalt binder The use of Stone Mastic Asphalt 9 5 mix reduces noise levels and is expected to have better long term performance as it is a mix designed specifically for long term performance relative to the other mixes MTO plans to monitor the test sections annually to determine the long term

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  • Road Talk, Vol 16, Issue 3
    when the new IDF Curve tool can be used for the design of MTO highway projects Figure 5 Highways during a rainfall event The interface tool is being made available through the MTO Internet website at http www mto gov on ca english engineering drainage index shtml as well as on the Provincial Highway Management Drainage and Hydrology Intranet Page For more information please contact Hani Farghaly Senior Engineer Hydrotechnical Design Highway Standards Branch at 905 704 2244 or at Hani Farghaly ontario ca or Muhammad Naeem Drainage Systems Engineer Highway Standards Branch at 905 704 2402 or at Muhammad Naeem ontario ca Top of page Technology That Takes Root Innovative Micropiles Successful at Scugog River Illustration of Micropile installation Illustration of root piles Source The History of Micropiles in North America April 3 4 2008 Las Vegas NV Dr Donald A Bruce GEOSYSTEMS LP presentation The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO has completed its first successful use of micropiles as the preferred design and construction alternative in a recent bridge project Micropiles were installed to support the pier foundations and to address local challenges with the widening of the Highway 7 Scugog River Bridge west of Highway 35 near Lindsay The existing three span Scugog River Bridge built in 1958 was widened by approximately 10 metres to the north to accommodate four lanes of Highway 7 traffic across the Scugog River Site challenges to widening included construction in the river which is approximately 2 metres deep maintaining the integrity of the existing bridge pier foundations during construction and the installation of foundations through 5 metres of a deposit of dense to very dense sands and gravels containing boulders and cobbles overlying limestone bedrock The project also required scour protection at the pier foundations These conditions precluded the use of spread footings and driven or augered piles that are normally used to support MTO bridges The design team of MTO staff in the Pavements and Foundations Section and Eastern Region the Prime Consultant Morrison Hershfield and the Foundation Engineering sub consultant Peto MacCallum worked closely reviewing foundation alternatives Due to the subsurface and site conditions the team selected micropiles as the preferred solution to support the piers in the water and to minimize the risk to the existing bridge during construction Micropiles provided several installation advantages Micropile installation offshore at west pier Micropiles were drilled five metres into the bedrock The cofferdam being dewatered and cleaned Micropiles were installed within a cofferdam Following the micropile installation a tremie concrete plug was placed beneath the water The cofferdam was then dewatered and cleaned prior to the concreting of the pier Cause minimal disturbance to adjacent structures soil and the environment Superior in access restrictive environments and in all soil types and ground conditions May be installed at any angle below the horizontal Allow the use of smaller equipment A micropile is constructed by drilling a small diameter borehole typically less than 300 mm Reinforcement steel is placed in the drilled shaft followed by tremie grouting Micropiles get their load carrying capacity from the bond between the grout in the micropile and the rock Due to the method of installation there is minimal disturbance and vibration to adjacent structures The installation methodology is also environmentally friendly Conceived in Italy in the early 1950 s micropiles were described as pali radici or root piles The term root piles is explained by the shape of the foundation which usually consists of bundles of piles diverging at various angles and resembling tree roots For the Scugog River Bridge project Geo Foundations were retained by the Prime Contractor Dufferin Construction to supply install and test the micropiles Micropile installation commenced in November of 2009 Pre production and production load testing were specified to verify the load carrying strength of the micropiles The pre production load testing was conducted on land adjacent to the river prior to the full scale micropile installation The production load testing was conducted on one micropile per pier Both tests verified the load carrying strength of the micropiles One micropile per pier was subjected to a production testing to verify the capacity of the micropile A controlled sequence of construction was required to install the pier foundation within the river and to avoid what is known as basal heave at the base of the excavation for the pier footing during any dewatering A temporary cofferdam box was installed by driving interlocking steel sheet piles to a prescribed depth in the river bed The sand and gravel were excavated within the cofferdam under water and the micropiles were drilled A 600 mm concrete plug on top of the piles was constructed by tremie pumping concrete under water within the cofferdam This prevented the base from heaving and also provided a working platform Water within the cofferdam was then pumped out and the pier was constructed on the micropile foundation On the Scugog River project a total of 19 micropiles were installed for each of the two piers in the river With limited access in the river and because of the smaller diameter 273 mm diameter borehole smaller equipment installed the micropiles Some of the piles were installed vertically and others were installed at an angle through the very dense sands gravels and boulders They were socketted approximately five metres into the limestone bedrock A settlement monitoring program verified that the existing bridge remained stable during the construction of the micropiles Settlement pins 13 mm steel bolts were embedded into the existing piers and conventional surveying revealed little or no movement of the existing bridge during construction The contractor completed the installation of the micropiles by mid February and enabled in water pier construction to be completed prior to the Department of Fisheries deadline of April 1 2010 The measurable success of this technology on the Hwy 7 Scugog River project has demonstrated that micropiles are a viable alternative to excavation driven or augered piles for foundations Micropiles met the technical demands and will be considered during the design of other foundations in the future For more information contact Tony Sangiuliano Materials Engineering and Research Office at 416 235 5267 or Tony Sangiuliano ontario ca or 416 235 5267 Top of page November 2010 As an introduction to MTOs measured implementation of the Design Build concept the August 2010 Road Talk article covered general concepts of Design Build Read our August 2010 article on the cost timing and quality benefits of Design Build here The Evolution of Design Build Ontario s Design Build Models Design Build is the process by which a single entity provides both the design and construction through the use of a single contract between a road authority and a contractor The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO is supplementing its contract delivery toolbox by implementing Design Build DB contracts to help deliver its expanding capital program DB is used in highway construction in both the United States and Canada but over the next three to four years MTO intends to become a leader in the area of DB by implementing its own performance based specifications on all suitable DB contracts Conventional Design Bid Build vs MTO Design Build Model Most of what the industry uses today to build roads in North America and Europe is a Design Bid Build DBB methodology DBB involves the use of two separate service providers one to perform the design and another to perform construction of a project Traditional and current MTO delivery practices include the DBB tendering and contracting process As the use of DB evolves at MTO appropriate contracts will be identified as appropriate for the DB method However MTO is developing its own DB philosophy that differs from conventional DB methods The two defining differences in MTO s DB model are the requirement for a longer performance warranty typically five years compared to the typical two year industry standard for DB contracts and MTO s focus on performance targets leaving many of the prescriptive elements of a contract to the discretion of the contractor For example the DB contract will include the preliminary design detailed scope highway alignment details and performance requirements but will refrain as much as possible from specifying the materials and construction methodology to be used by the DB contractor Once the contract is underway MTO will conduct a review of the design some key milestone inspections as needed and performance tests at completion and during the warranty period to ensure contractor conformance MTO also has an intervention process in place when contractors are in non conformance This provides incentives for contractors to self monitor and deign and build it right the first time How MTO Considers Projects for DB Contract Model Suitability MTO s DB vision includes a list of criteria to identify appropriate projects Depending on their level of complexity identified DB projects may be designated as Design Build Minor or Design Build Major DB Minor projects are smaller and simpler identified as low risk low complexity projects such as minor rehabilitation not affected by encumbrances e g property utilities or environmental issues DB Minor projects generally cost less than 10M and are likely completed in one construction season DB Major projects are more complex and include large rehabilitation reconstruction or expansion projects They have a construction value of less than 100M and can span multiple construction seasons Experience of other jurisdictions Based upon the results of a US Federal Highway Authority FWHA study the DB delivery approach has proven to be successful among the majority of state DOTs and Transportation agencies that have implemented Design Build contracts FWHA survey respondents managing DB projects almost unanimously indicated that they prefer the DB method for appropriate project types Quantitative data on the results of DB is somewhat difficult to obtain but on average the respondents indicate that DB reduced project delivery time by 14 and decreased total project costs by an average of 3 in comparison to Design Bid Build while maintaining the same level of quality Development of the MTO Design Build Models Design Build contracting and multi year warranties have been gradually introduced at the ministry Some DB elements were tested during MTO s contract re engineering era of the mid 1990 s and on the seven year pavement projects of 2006 These contracts represent significant first steps in MTO s approach toward the development of a full complement of performance based specifications for highway construction MTO has engaged industry partners during the development of the DB models to allow them to better understand the principles of the models and performance based specifications to mitigate risks and to incrementally improve the model over time The Future of MTO Design Build Applications Starting in 2010 MTO established a target to deliver one or two DB Minor projects in each region As of September 1st seven contracts have been tendered with one currently in the award process The first contact was awarded in Northeastern Region and involved expansion joint replacements for a bridge in Cochrane The remaining three contract awards were for structural and non structural culvert replacements in Eastern West and Central regions The project currently in the award process is for the replacement of noise barrier panels The projects for 2010 were all low dollar value low complexity projects allowing MTO to test the model with minimal risk It is expected that each of MTO s regions may have 3 4 projects per year suitable for DB Minor In August 2010 the Contract Innovations Office hosted an internal DB Major Information and Planning Workshop The purpose of the workshop was to learn from the experiences of other leading jurisdictions and establish some basic principles for the further development of DB Major Jay Hietpas from the Minnesota Department of Transportation shared MnDOT s experiences with DB over the past decade including the award winning replacement of the I35 Bridge after its collapse in 2007 Bruce McAllister from the British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure provided a candid and informative summary of some of the key challenges and success factors that he has witnessed in his 18 years of experience with DB in B C including complex projects such as the Kicking Horse Canyon Bridge and the reconstruction of the Sea to Sky Highway in advance of the 2010 Winter Olympics Several issues considerations key to the development of the MTO s DB Major program were covered during focus groups discussion Decisions reached during the workshop will set the foundation as MTO develops contract documents in anticipation of tendering a limited number of DB Major contracts starting in 2011 For more information please contact Brenda Liegler Contract Innovations Engineer at 613 544 2220 ext 1758 or at Brenda Liegler ontario ca Top of page Critter Crossings Wildlife Protection Initiatives The Ministry of Transportation MTO strives to continually improve highway safety throughout Ontario for motorists including ways to prevent or discourage wild animals from entering roadways and colliding with vehicles Over the past few years MTO in cooperation with the Ministry of Natural Resources MNR has developed and implemented various wildlife protection initiatives across the province Since collisions with wild animals can result in serious vehicle damage personal injury or even death MTO has implemented several preventive measures to warn or aid drivers and help keep animals from wandering onto the road including Installing fencing along major highways Removing roadside brush to improve roadside visibility Draining salty ponds beside highways to avoid attracting wildlife Posting warning signs where there is a history of wildlife collision Installing highway lighting to improve visibility at night This wildlife structure the first of its kind in Ontario uses the combination of wildlife fencing and a bridge which crosses the highway overhead MTO has constructed wildlife crossings or has included wildlife crossings in design considerations to ensure habitat connectivity when fencing prohibits animal access to the highway Three such examples are Overhead Crossing for Wildlife As part of the Highway 69 four laning project a wildlife bridge has been constructed in an area known to have a high rate of large mammal collisions on the existing highway 1 km north of Highway 637 in the Burwash area The concept of the project is to maintain animal movements without impacting traffic Fencing along the highway right of way on both sides is intended to funnel animals to a bridge crossing The wildlife bridge was designed as a 30 metre land bridge crossing over the future four lane Highway 69 It will be landscaped with trees shrubs brush rock piles etc providing a natural environment to encourage wildlife use Furthermore the landscaping will provide a visual buffer to highway traffic The wildlife crossing will be accessible for use by animals by the fall of 2010 As a first in Ontario a monitoring program will commence once the crossing has opened and will continue for the next few years to assess its use through animal track counts and video imagery For more information on the Highway 69 Overhead Wildlife Bridge please contact Heather Garbutt Senior Transportation Environmental Planner Planning Environmental Section Provincial Highway Management Northeastern Region at 705 497 5205 or at Heather Garbutt ontario ca Turtle Crossing and Barriers The turtle crossing uses an elliptical culvert Anti glare mesh screen is used as a turtle barrier fence to restrict turtle movement onto the roadway An artificial turtle nesting habitat made of fine crushed stone sand and gravel In fall 2009 turtle protection measures were installed north of the Village of Caledon as part of the Highway 10 widening project To mitigate turtle mortality and promote environmental sustainability through the protection and conservation of wildlife MTO in consultation with the Ministry of Natural Resources designed and implemented an under road wildlife crossing a barrier system and artificial nesting habitat Turtle Crossing Similar to a pipe culvert design for fish crossings below the turtle crossing uses an elliptical culvert The top ends of the culvert have been cut to maximize the amount of light in the culvert helping to attract wildlife through the culvert A mesh screen is attached around the area of the culvert opening to prevent turtles from climbing onto the roadway Turtle Barrier Fence Studies have shown that turtles can climb fences Anti glare mesh screen is used as a turtle barrier fence to restrict turtle movement onto the roadway The turtle fence is affixed directly onto the highway fence and funnels directs the turtles to the culvert installed underneath the highway At the North Credit River Bridge a total of 1028 m of turtle fence was installed Though the fence is 1 m high it features a 200 mm 90 degree bend on top that will prevent turtles from climbing and accessing the right of way Turtle Nesting Habitat In addition to mitigating the loss of turtles on the highway MTO and MNR have developed an artificial turtle nesting habitat made of fine crushed stone sand and gravel The habitat was constructed at the ends of the turtle crossing to provide an area for turtle egg laying This habitat attracts turtles to the crossing due to it s exposure to the sun To evaluate the turtle crossing system a monitoring program will begin in the spring of 2011 Monitoring will continue for the next two years For more information on Turtle Crossings please contact Luis Orantes Environmental Planner Planning Environment Office Central Region at 416 235 3852 or luis orantes ontario ca Gravity Pipe Design Policy with Fish Crossings Substrate placement inside a culvert for safe fish travel In 2007 MTO launched the new and improved Gravity Pipe Design policy As of 2010 these guidelines are being applied to all design assignments for new gravity pipes installed on Ontario s provincial highways Under these guidelines designers are required to consider fish habitat when installing culverts pipes across or along highways A key consideration in the design of pipe culvert crossings is to avoid creating a barrier to fish traveling in either direction of water

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  • Road Talk, Vol 16, Issue 3
    soil moisture and pressure conditions was installed at seven frost susceptible locations Pavement conditions were monitored at three of these sites using falling weight deflectometers at regular intervals throughout the freeze and thaw periods These are non destructive testing devices that calculate the strength and stiffness of pavement material by measuring surface response under the impact of a weight dropped from a preset height This data was used by the University of Waterloo to develop a preliminary frost thaw index model which is calculated using air temperatures combined with site specific surface temperatures Additional pavement strength tests were conducted using light weight deflectometers in 2008 and 2009 by Lakehead University in order to calibrate Waterloo s frost thaw index model to the specific pavement conditions at the seven test sites This information was used to develop a frost depth forecast which is currently available on the ministry s Road Weather Information System RWIS as a prototype system to assist road mangers with load restriction decision making Subsurface and air temperatures combined with soil moisture data are used to present a graphical three day thaw depth forecast for each of the test sites Over the course of the next two years Lakehead University will test and calibrate the thaw index model validating it against the actual dates when restrictions are set or removed using conventional methods It will also be tested against archived pavement conditions from the RWIS database to find cast restriction dates to further refine the model Once tested and validated this system could be used to predict frost and thaw depths at other sites with similar weather and pavement conditions If shown to produce optimal load restriction dates based on actual pavement conditions then the next phase of this project will be to implement a map based decision support system on the ministry s RWIS site that would provide five day pavement thaw forecasts for improved decision making For more information please contact Max Perchanok Design and Contracts Standards Office at 416 235 4680 or Max Perchanok ontario ca Top of page Driving in Harmony with Wildlife Large Animal Detection and Warning System Installed Near Sault Ste Marie Figure 1 MTO Large Animal Detection and Warning System sign and flashing light Looking south along Highway 17 up Mile Hill row of modules with solar panel detectors and control boxes shown running parallel to the highway in red circle Over the years the Ministry of Transportation MTO has explored numerous methods to reduce wildlife vehicle collisions In November 2009 MTO installed Ontario s first wildlife detection system on a stretch of Highway 17 north of Sault Ste Marie This Large Animal Detection Warning System is designed to alert drivers to wildlife in the right of way so that extra caution is used when driving This will improve road safety for motorists and preserve wildlife Collisions with large animals result in extensive vehicle damage and increase the potential for serious injuries Because it is a prime habitat and movement corridor for moose and numerous reports of collisions the Mile Hill area on Highway 17 north of Sault Ste Marie has been identified as a high wildlife collision area The straight and flat alignment of this stretch of highway provides good sight lines making this an ideal location for the installation of a Large Animal Detection and Warning System Funded through the Ministry of Northern Development Mines and Forestry s Northern Highways Program the MTO system was installed at the bottom of Mile Hill and extends northerly for approximately 1 5 km This system continuously monitors the highway lanes and shoulders using infrared beams When the sensors are activated by an animal a flashing beacon automatically warns drivers The innovative features of the system include Year round operation in all weather using solar panels and batteries Fully automated with no external controls or connections No impediment on wildlife movement Accurate detection by requiring the animal to break two beams mounted at different heights thereby reducing false activations by small animals Minimal maintenance due to off the shelf non custom hardware This system aims to raise drivers awareness to the presence of wildlife on or near the highway Most noticeably the driver will see an amber light attached to the top of a standard moose crossing sign Figure 1 When the amber light starts flashing drivers are expected to reduce their driving speed and be extra vigilant for the presence of wildlife It typically takes at least two to three years data to evaluate a new highway technology Through the pilot MTO will determine the value of installing similar systems in other parts of the province MTO will monitor and assess the system s operation through on site observation cameras analysis of captured data and analysis of driver speed and wildlife vehicle collision data Preliminary results from a similar system installed in Minnesota in 2009 indicate a 50 to 60 reduction in vehicle collisions with wildlife since the detection system installation For Ontario s application there has been no wildlife vehicle collisions reported since the system was installed on this section of Highway 17 last November For more information please contact Jason Ranger Project Engineer at 705 497 5263 or Jason Ranger ontario ca Gordan Rennie Regional Issues Advisor Northeast Region at 705 497 5264 or Gordan Rennie ontario ca Top of page MTO is in the process of re introducing the Design Build concept to supplement its delivery model toolbox This two part article will first define the general concepts of Design Build and will be followed next month with more details on how MTO is implementing the Design Build concept Design Build for Provincial Highways What is Design Build Time Savings Design Build vs Conventional Design Bid Build Source Dr Keith Molenaar University of Colorado at Boulder Design Build Effectiveness Study As Required by TEA 21 Section 1307 f Final Report prepared for USDOT Federal Highway Administration January 2006 For larger view please refer to the PDF here Widely used in many states and around the world Design Build is the process by which a single entity the Design Builder provides both design and construction through a single contract with a road authority Although Design Build contracts typically require more time up front to clearly develop the scope of the project and to procure the overall project schedules are typically reduced Other Design Build benefits include a reduction in overall project costs a reduction in claims and when coupled with extended performance warranties equal or better quality Advantages of Design Build Since the Design Builder assumes more responsibility for quality cost and scheduling the Design Builder has more flexibility to bring expertise innovative designs new materials and construction techniques to the project in order to meet performance warranty requirements The elimination of a second procurement process for a construction contract condenses project delivery time With proper phasing of a project Design Build can be used to accelerate delivery of a contract by allowing the contractor to begin construction before the entire design package has been fully completed Integrating design and construction activities reduces the potential for design errors and discontinuities between the design plans and construction efforts resulting in fewer change orders and delays to the project Greater cost efficiencies are more likely to occur for Design Build projects as the Design Builder can implement cost effective ways to achieve the performance objectives of the project resulting in overall benefits to taxpayers Reducing the potential for cost growth through Design Build contracting enables the road authority to better manage capital program funds allowing for more effective program planning and implementation The use of Design Build contracting provides an effective way for road authorities to leverage the knowledge and experience of the Design Builder to exercise value engineering approaches and constructability reviews to the maximum benefit of the overall project The level of preliminary design that should be completed before a Design Build contract is procured depends on the size and complexity of the project the ability of the Design Builder to develop a more cost effective and constructible project design in a timely and competent manner and the degree to which performance specifications are used for the project Experience indicates higher contracting agency satisfaction with Design Build projects that have lower levels of preliminary design performed before the involvement of the Design Build team For more information please contact Brenda Liegler Contract Innovations Engineer at 613 544 2220 ext 1758 or at Brenda Liegler ontario ca Top of page Building Bridges Using Top Down Technology Advancing the system across a river Advancing the system across the highway The Ministry of Transportation MTO is investigating opportunities to use a new bridge building technology when constructing or repairing bridges that either span sensitive wetlands or are located in congested highway areas While reducing costs and impacts to the environment this new bridge building machine also has the potential to streamline construction scheduling Bridge construction has become more challenging especially in congested urban environments or environmentally sensitive areas Traffic delays and safety in congested work zones are public concerns that come with significant costs to address As well bridge construction in environmentally sensitive areas usually has schedule restrictions or limitations to protect the features and habitat of the sensitive area Bermingham Foundation Solutions BFS a Hamilton Ontario based company partnered with Italian construction company Deal Rezzani Eichler to develop an innovative solution BFS and Deal Rezzani Eichler developed a single integrated bridge building machine that includes a tilting lead system an innovative pile driving system and associated beam launcher It is capable of driving piles setting up the bent caps and the girders and pouring the deck By building a bridge from its incrementally launched deck BFS s prototype machine does not disturb the environment below Building bridges by incremental launching is not new and has been used by MTO in the past It consists of casting sections of the bridge superstructure at a stationary location behind an abutment and then the completed or partially completed structure is jacked into place horizontally with jacks along the bridge axis Incremental launching saves costs by using prefabricated bridge parts which lowers the costs of equipment labour and eventually maintenance Combining incremental launching with this new machine saves time and money alleviating many of the environmental challenges of modern bridge building Driving piles on a new bent During construction this 65 tonne machine will drive piles for the first bridge pier from shore The bridge deck can then be laid as far as the first pier to hold the machine while it drives piles for the second pier Designed to cause less environmental disturbance than traditional methods the system alleviates the need for temporary support trestles or barges to carry equipment In the fall of 2009 the machine was used in the successful and early completion of a 4 8 km bridge on the Washington Bypass project in North Carolina Spanning wetlands and the Tar River the bridge was completed ten months ahead of schedule despite a six month delay in construction start up due to fisheries restrictions Two machines were deployed one at each end of the bridge These machines designed to suit the construction methodology required to build the bridge measured nearly 183m long each so that they would cover three 40m bents under different stages of construction plus an extra pier bent to allow supply of material by trucks piles pile caps and girders Washington Bypass Bridge Project Specifications Bermingham Foundation Solutions prototype machine is capable of constructing bridges without disturbing the environment below This machine is capable of driving piles setting up the bent caps and the girders and pouring the deck Machine maximum suspended length 45m Max bridge pier bent 40m Pile 30 x 30 x 128 long precast concrete Maximum pile weight 40 10 44 metric ton Maximum pile pull out force with hydraulic foot extension deployed hammer pile weight 20 extra metric ton 85 metric ton Maximum critical payload while in full suspension 60 metric ton pile cap sections Maximum girder weight 90 metric ton Expected production 1 complete bent every 9 days piles pile caps girders reinforcing steel final concrete deck pour and curing Actual average production 1 complete bent every 4 days Actual maximum sustained production 1 complete bent every 48 hours 1 day for curing concrete Building a full length bridge the size of the Washington Bypass Bridge had an estimated cost of 300 million USD By proposing the use of the new bridge building machine for the project BFS completed the project which included three other bridges and access roads for 192 million USD less than two thirds of the original cost estimate for conventional construction Since the January 2010 the ministry has initiated a review of its bridge replacement program to identify potential long span bridge candidates to apply this innovative solution For more information please contact Vincent Zingaro Senior Strategic Project Engineer Bridge Office at 905 704 2578 or at Vincent Zingaro Ontario ca Top of page Be Quiet Short wavelength Surface Textures of Portland Cement Concrete Pavements Reduce Roadway Noise A photograph of deep 16 mm spacing transverse tining with shadows highlighting longer wavelength texture ripples generated due to subtle displacements of coarse aggregates beneath the surface paste caused by deep grooving with conventional tining rake fingers A Texture Scanning Laser device measuring a closely spaced experimental grooved texture section A research project on the experimental surface texturing of fresh Portland cement concrete PCC pavement was recently initiated by the US Federal Highway Administration FHWA to identify quiet concrete pavements with good skid resistance The Ontario Ministry of Transportation MTO partnered with the Federal Highway Administration and their consultant Soils and Materials Engineers Inc to construct a trial as part of this study Placing PCC pavement with inappropriate surface texture can cause a surface that is either too smooth and does not provide sufficient skid resistance or too coarse and results in excessive tire pavement noise Generating excessive noise on the roadway is an environmental impact and may result in costly remediation action noise barriers Optimizing the PCC pavement texture is an engineering balancing act An ideal texture size and shape is just large enough to provide good drainage and friction during heavy rains but small enough and of the right shape with a short wavelength to reduce tire pavement noise To assist with this issue the FHWA initiated a research study on experimental texturing of new PCC pavement with the objective to evaluate methods that can be used to create texture in new concrete surfaces consistent with pre defined texture limits The specified texture limits were Mean texture depth between 0 8 mm to 1 0 mm ie average macrotexture depth between 0 8 and 1 0 mm which is similar to a tining depth of 2 2 5 mm at an average tining spacing of 8 mm Maximum texture content in wavelengths between 2 mm to 8 mm ie spacing of tinings between 2 mm and 8 mm Minimum texture content in wavelengths of 50 mm to 100 mm ie minimal rippling due to aggregate displacement In Ontario FHWA established a test site on Highway 401 east of Windsor that shrinks the texture feature spacing while maximizing the depth of the texture to the greatest extent practical It results in textures that have low spacing to depth aspect ratios Texture profile scans for the four primary types of textures fabricated at the test site The study examined several texture fabrication techniques and tools were evaluated including stamps rollers scrapers pokers and miniaturized tining rake devices This lead to the construction of five texture test sections which included 16 mm spacing MTO typical deep transverse tining 16 mm spacing longitudinal tining previously used by MTO Three innovative short wavelength textures 8 mm constant spacing flexible finger rake transverse tining 7 to 16 mm variable finger spacing rigid scraper transverse tining 4 to 12 mm spacing flexible finger rake transverse tining Results indicated that the 8 mm constant spacing flexible finger tining rake was the most successful tool meeting the target texture limits set by FHWA The rigid finger scraper device results were also good but the rigid scraper device is more difficult to use Miniaturized tining rake assemblies can be used with modern conventional texturing machines provided the texturing machines have precise down force control and good adjustments for rake position and symmetry The short wavelength experimental textures generally had friction levels equal to those of the MTO standard 16 mm transverse tining while International Roughness Index IRI values were 0 1 to 0 2 m km lower In addition noise levels at frequencies less than about 2 000 Hz were decreased In general the short wavelength transverse textures averaging about 8 mm spacing were found to be quieter and appear to offer equal or better skid resistance to conventional deeper transverse tining with 16 mm groove spacing The positive results from this study are one of several initiatives the ministry is taking to promote greener roads For more information please contact Becca Lane Head Pavements and Foundations Section at 416 235 3732 or at Becca Lane ontario ca Top of page Seeing Green ORBA in Partnership with MTO and OGRA Creates a New Award to Recognize Environmental Excellence Ontario s Ministry of Transportation MTO is partnering with the Ontario Road Builders Association ORBA and the Ontario Good Roads Association OGRA to present a new annual ORBA Green Leadership and Sustainability Award to recognize and promote environmental stewardship in the road building industry There will be one Outstanding Achievement Award each year as well as Honourable Mention awards as determined by the judging committee The new award will recognize the leadership of ORBA members that initiate or adopt practices methods management approaches innovations changes in equipment materials or other initiatives to further the objectives of environmental protection and sustainability Work on a MTO capital or maintenance contract or other municipal or

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  • Road Talk, Vol 15, Issue 2
    tracked into stockpile areas Water used to wash winter maintenance equipment is captured and processed through an oil water separator to prevent hydrocarbons from infiltrating the environment A space saving secondary containment system for de icing liquids has been designed to capture more than the capacity of the tank should it fail and is protected to avoid collisions with maintenance equipment The secondary containment system consists of a liquid storage tank placed inside a larger poly tank A submersible pump positioned at the top of the storage tank is used to draw excess de icing liquid from the storage tank into the spreader units Other features of the Goderich facility include A drive through system to allow safe and efficient traffic flow in and out of the facility The retrofitting of the storage facility as a full addition to the existing sand storage structure The accommodation of a site constraint from being in proximity with a local airport limiting structure height to a maximum of 30 feet Multiple entrances that enable a stacking unit to be used for stockpiling salt and sand prior to the winter season Enough storage capacity for a winter season If additional salt is required during the winter season it is delivered by a tandem trailer that is able to dump material inside the facility These benefits are augmented by MTO s documented standards for material handling While all loading and unloading operations occur indoors formal procedures are in place for material clean up in the event of an outdoor spill Policies also require the cleanup of loading and spreading equipment after each storm event and a detailed safety program maintains employee safety The Goderich facility and its award from the Salt Institute reflect MTO s ongoing commitment to improve upon best management practices in the storage and handling of de icing materials and to minimize the environmental impact of patrol yards across the province For related articles please see the Winter 2006 and Winter 2008 issues of Road Talk For more information please contact John Roberto Maintenance Officer Highway Standards Branch at 905 704 2973 Top of page MTO s First pervious Concrete Pavement Trial Construction of Pervious Concrete Pavement Parking Lot Completed Pervious Concrete Parking Lot In an effort to reduce the size of our ecological footprint MTO is trying an emerging green technology pervious pavements Pervious pavements allow water to percolate through the pavement and into the subgrade a unique and effective design that addresses important environmental concerns They offer a functional surface suitable for many low speed applications such as parking lots and walkways Pervious pavements provide several benefits to more effective land use including less interference with the water table lowered impact to vegetation decreased effect on ambient surface temperatures and reduced need for pavement drainage The concrete used is typically a low slump open graded mix consisting of Portland cement coarse aggregate admixtures water and little or no fine aggregate A high void content 15 to 25 and the presence of inter connected pores result in a free draining pavement layer that allows water to drain directly into the subgrade replenishing the groundwater and potentially reducing the need for storm water management devices such as ponds and or swales Better passage of water and air through the pavement and into the ground supplies the root systems of adjacent vegetation enhancing roadside vegetation growth Furthermore compared to regular pavements pervious pavements also produce a lower heat island lessening surface and ambient temperature increases associated with land surface modification in urban areas To test the pavement s performance over time MTO has designed and constructed its first pervious concrete pavement A commuter parking lot adjacent to Highway 401 approximately 50 km west of Toronto near Milton has served as a test site since 2007 The test site consists of five layers the bottom layer is composed of silty sand subgrade Directly on top of this layer rests select subgrade material followed by an additional 200 mm of granular base material Above the granular base material sits approximately 100 mm of open graded clear stone Finally 240 mm of pervious concrete forms the uppermost layer to complete the pervious concrete pavement The contractor Facca Incorporated placed the pervious concrete and underlying granular materials while Dufferin Concrete was subcontracted for the material design and supply of the pervious concrete The contractor used a Bid Well bridge deck finishing machine to lay down a majority of the pervious concrete pavement The contractor chose to use razorback screed an air driven steel truss to construct the final length of the pavement due to restricted access for construction vehicles Trial results will be used to develop an industry standard for pervious concrete pavement MTO will continue to monitor the pervious pavement test site to evaluate the performance and environmental benefits of pervious pavements for some time This technology may provide the ministry with another tool for building more environmentally friendly low volume pavements in Ontario For more information please contact Chris Raymond Senior Pavement Design Engineer at 416 235 3513 Linda Fischer Head Planning and Environmental at 416 235 5488 Maria Bianchin Senior Concrete Engineer at 416 235 3710 Top of page Now you see us now you don t Burlington Bay Skyway Joint Replacement Goes Unnoticed by Bridge Users New bridge joint being lowered into position during overnight replacement New bridge joint being installed overnight For most drivers in Ontario it seems as though there are two driving seasons winter and construction During the construction season drivers may face traffic congestion and time delays due to highway maintenance or repair Construction traffic conditions and delays can be frustrating for drivers trying to reach their destinations on time However repairs on the Burlington Bay Skyway were completed with little disruption to the travelling public The replacement project for the six modular joints of the Burlington Bay Skyway was a very innovative solution The project proceeded with little disturbance to traffic and to drivers who were hardly aware

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  • Road Talk, Vol 14, Issue 2
    for the map s final production Since then the overall process has remained broadly similar but small changes are constantly being made to take advantage of the latest advances in computer mapping technology Development of the map is done cooperatively between MTO and the Ministry of Tourism For the 2008 map Ontario s Ministry of Natural Resources MNR Provincial Geomatics Services Centre PGSC was contracted on a one time basis so that the map could be created in ESRI s ArcGIS 9 2 ArcGIS is an integrated suite of GIS software that allows for precision and extensive streamlining of the map making process In the future maps will be maintained by MTO recreated from existing ArcGIS data Traditionally the Ontario Road Map and MTO s GIS records have been maintained separately requiring multiple updates for the integration of new data MNR s integration of the map with ArcGIS however will allow MTO to use its GIS data to drive map creation thus eliminating redundancy Additionally ArcGIS gives MTO the ability to create custom maps using the current Ontario Road Map as a base where layers can easily be turned on or off The most recent version of ArcGIS also provides for improved symbol functionality and cartographic representation so that core data isn t modified when minor cosmetic changes are made to the map In the first step cartographers prepared a pilot project using a small test area of the provincial map This allowed MNR to flush out issues with the software and updates and obtain a better understanding of the work that would be involved in preparing the finished project Next the cartographers made adjustments to the GIS data Some layers required more upgrade than others including drainage lakes and rivers built up areas and municipal boundaries The team then created two maps one for Northern Ontario and one for Southern Ontario to be exactly the same as the previous 2006 version of the Ontario Road Map The next step involved compiling the updates for 2008 Requests for updated information were made to information sources during the year leading up to the map s printing MTO compiled these updates and sent them to MNR to update the road maps for Northern and Southern Ontario Once the final output was produced the finished map was exported to Adobe Illustrator where its final layout could be adjusted The finished Ontario Road Map was delivered in multiple digital formats PDF Adobe Illustrator files and an ArcGIS Geodatabase Final changes were made to the map by MTO and a printer was contracted to carry out the printing process More than 810 000 copies of the Ontario Road Map are printed in production years Ontario s Ministry of Tourism receives 800 000 copies for free distribution at Provincial Travel Information Centres while another 10 000 are retained by MTO for sale through Publication Ontario Online POOL at 2 95 per single copy with reduced prices for bulk purchase Reprints are made at the request of the Ministry of Tourism The Official Road Map of Ontario is also accessible online from MTO s web portal at http www mto gov on ca english traveller map where it is amongst the ministry s most popular pages As the evolution of the Ontario Road Map continues its importance as a multi thematic cartographic display will also grow as will its incorporation of the newest innovations in GIS and mapmaking software With a recurring press run of over 800 000 copies the Official Road Map of Ontario is a high profile publication that both serves the varied purposes of its users and demonstrates MTO s commitment to innovation Upcoming Conference Information Transportation Association of Canada TAC Annual Conference Exhibition September 21 24 2008 Toronto Ontario For volunteer opportunities please visit http portal mto ad gov on ca sites MTO PHM tac default aspx North Atlantic Transportation Planning Officials NATPO Conference Queen s Landing Niagara on the Lake Ontario August 10 12 2008 06 10 please visit www natpo ca OTC Parking Workshop Supplier Showcase September 14 16 2008 Stratford London please visit www otc org For more information please contact bryan simmons ontario ca Cartographic Technologist Highway Standards Branch at 905 704 2316 Top of page MTO Hosts Winter Maintenance Technology Open House The Ontario Provincial Police were also on hand to demonstrate the technology that they use year round including breathalysers and traffic enforcement cameras Participants from across the province gathered to view and participate in a series of interactive presentations on MTO s winter maintenance operations As part of MTO s commitment to the constant development of its winter maintenance toolkit MTO held its annual Maintenance Technology Project Open House on March 5 2008 in North Bay The Open House like those held in years past provided an opportunity for participants to view the cutting edge technology materials equipment and best practices for winter operations that contribute to MTO and the Maintenance Technology Project s vision of ensuring that Ontario is an effective efficient and environmentally conscious highway maintenance leader Through partnerships between head office and regional offices product manufacturers vendors and maintenance contractors the Maintenance Technology Project aims to achieve a number of strategic goals including Protecting the environment by reducing salt usage Moving away from methods based specifications Improving operational and contract oversight Moving towards outcome measuring and reporting While appropriate winter weather was the story outside maintenance officers and MTO contractors inside delivered a series of engaging presentations on some of the newest additions to the ministry s winter maintenance toolkit Participants from across the province gathered to view and participate in a series of interactive presentations on topics ranging from MTO s use of RWIS to determine Spring load restrictions and salt management and material storage handling at patrol yards to Direct Liquid Application anti icing hot water sanding the Tow Plow and the Two Stage Plow As part of the open house the Ontario Provincial Police were also on hand to demonstrate

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