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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    non slip materials direct visible from adjacent uses and illuminated at night to enhance personal safety and maintained year round and cleared of snow and ice during winter months 2 1 2 Open Space Networks Planning for new and existing open space networks should be coordinated with existing and planned transit systems to strengthen connections to and from transit services and enhance the experience of transit users Open space networks are linked parks plazas natural areas and bicycle walking trails The layout and design of a community s open spaces can help to support transit use by enhancing connections between the community and its transit network integrating stations into their surroundings and improving the experience for transit users Plazas parks and trails help to make higher density transit supportive environments more attractive and liveable When provided in conjunction with higher density mixed use development along a route or corridor open space systems can be important generators of activity encouraging people to take transit rather than drive to reach recreational activities From a commuting perspective the creation and or coordination of a comprehensive park and open space network that is linked to transit stops and station areas is an important opportunity to strengthen connections between a community and its transit system Linking a transit system to a network of parks and open spaces can provide access for users to off street pedestrian and cycling trail systems extending the reach of station catchment areas At the scale of the station the introduction of new plazas or other open spaces represents an opportunity to strengthen the identity of the station and surrounding area as a neighbourhood and community hub enhance local connectivity and provide a place for amenities such as seating public art or cycling facilities Where planned investments in transit result in a grade separated rights of way the creation of a transit side trail system is an excellent way to enhance connections for pedestrians and cyclists leading to and from stations The MetroBikeLink in St Clair County Illinois above connects urban and regional open spaces along the MetroLink transit line Strategies layout Extend existing park and open space networks where possible to link with transit stops and station areas Where planned transit investments occur off street along green corridors or in utility rights of way explore the potential for the transit corridors to act as an extension of the community s open space network Strategies could include the creation of a transit side multi use trail connecting with existing trails and open spaces along the route and landscaping the transit corridor to create a planted greenway that results in a more positive experience for users and enhances the image of the system Pursue opportunities to co locate destination open spaces and transit networks to enable access to these areas by transit while taking into consideration compatibility and safety measures where appropriate San Francisco Transit and Trails The Transit and Trails program run by the Bay Area s Open Space Council connects

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    two people walking side by side on all principal pedestrian routes in nodes and corridors see illustration below Where feasible locate the pedestrian through zone beyond the splash zone and incorporate an additional furnishing zone to accommodate bus shelters waiting areas landscaping and the potential for retail or commercial spill out space Appropriate widths and other features will vary and should be determined in consultation with relevant geometric standards and guidelines Provide a broader pedestrian through zone with a suggested width of 2 4m or more in areas with high volumes of pedestrian traffic such as pedestrian districts Work with community representatives including youth the elderly and persons with disabilities to identify key destinations and target sidewalk provision and other enhancements to better connect those areas rural settlements In small towns or rural settlement areas where the provision of sidewalks may not be feasible consider providing a paved shoulder linking major destinations in and around stop station area Appropriate widths and other features will vary and should be determined in consultation with relevant geometric standards and guidelines amenities Provide a range of pedestrian amenities Guideline 3 4 3 to enhance pedestrian comfort and safety including trees to provide shade during hot summer months and contribute to an attractive pedestrian environment furnishings such as benches and waste bins and attractive pedestrian oriented lighting Coordinate the provision of pedestrian amenities with patterns of usage concentrating amenities along key streets leading to and from stop or station areas or between key destinations Street related buildings can contribute to pedestrian amenity through the provision of canopies or elements designed to mitigate the impacts of wind or weather conditions Incorporate curb cuts at all pedestrian crossings to assist people with strollers carts or mobility issues Sidewalks on principal pedestrian routes within nodes and corridors should provide for broad pedestrian through zones particularly in pedestrian districts An additional furnishing zone to accommodate bus shelters and waiting areas street trees planters and the potential for retail or commercial spill out space may also be required In older downtowns and main street settings constrained rights of way may make it difficult to implement pedestrian improvements When this occurs trade offs should be considered such as reduced lane widths which can expand the pedestrian through zone or small building setbacks at key intersections and station areas that can help to provide more generous pedestrian areas over time Establish a regular maintenance schedule and prioritize snow removal in winter months along high traffic routes and key streets leading to and from transit stops or station areas Design all streets with frequent opportunities for safe crossing at a signalized intersection stop sign or activated crossing Reducing curb radii to the minimum required to accommodate turning vehicles can help to reduce crossing distances for pedestrians Recommended Resources Pedestrian and Transit Friendly Design A Primer for Smart Growth Ewing Pedestrian Design Guidelines City of Portland World Class Streets Remaking New York s Public Realm New York City Department of Transportation Planning and Design for Pedestrians and Cyclists Vélo Québec Ontario Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines Ontario Ministry of Transportation Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code Canadian Standards Association Geometric design guide for Canadian roads Transportation Association of Canada Geometric design standards for Ontario highways Ontario Ministry of Transportation Walk and Roll Peel Peel Region Walk 21 intersections Design intersections to balance the needs of pedestrians and vehicles by avoiding using right turn channels and turning lanes that enable higher vehicle speeds and increase crossing points maintaining the minimum curb radii required to accommodate turning vehicles in order to reduce their speed and minimize crossing distances for pedestrians providing pedestrian refuge points when crossings exceed 15m in length and incorporating unique pavement treatments or markings that can alert drivers and indicate pedestrian priority At signalized intersections with high pedestrian traffic consider the use of a pedestrian priority phase to enable simultaneous pedestrian crossings in all directions Ensure intersections are clear of unnecessary obstructions and provide clear sight lines to adjacent streets so that pedestrians can spot approaching vehicles pedestrian pathways Pedestrian pathways can be used to shorten walking distances between destinations or provide access through natural areas infrastructure easements or open spaces Where possible paths should be wide enough with a suggested width of 1 8 m or more to allow persons with strollers wheelchair users and others to pass while remaining on the pathway Multi use trails intended to accommodate both pedestrians and cyclists need to be wide enough and have clear sightlines to accommodate users moving at different speeds and should be clearly marked Recommended widths and other design features are provided in the Ontario Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines bridges and overpasses Design bridges and overpasses to accommodate all users for example by providing a sidewalk on either side of the structure Appropriate widths and other features should be determined in consultation with relevant geometric standards and guidelines Design bridges to enable pedestrians to see from one end to the other for safety Integrate ramps into the structure and provide direct connections to adjacent sidewalks On busy overpasses the provision of planted or structural buffers between the sidewalk and street can help to enhance the sense of safety for pedestrians 2 2 3 Supporting Cyclists The design of streets should help support the establishment of an extensive cycling network creating safe and convenient streets for cyclists that are linked with transit minimize conflicts between cyclists and other modes of transportation and contain amenities to support cycling While transit is best suited for medium to long distance commutes cycling as a mode of transportation can be very effective for shorter trips and can accommodate multiple stops in between The combination of cycling and transit creates an opportunity for commuters to cover longer distances while allowing them to conveniently reach destinations that may be up to 5 km from a stop or station This can greatly extend the reach of a transit system providing a level of service that is comparable to that of the private automobile Streets that have been designed solely for motorized vehicles can be intimidating for cyclists placing them in conflict with other vehicles and pedestrians The creation of a network of cycling friendly streets and supportive infrastructure leading to and from transit will help to support and encourage users who otherwise may find it difficult to reach transit or conversely may want to cycle from transit to their final destination This is particularly important in rural and suburban environments where densities are low destinations are dispersed and vehicular speeds are high Establishing a range of cycling infrastructure within a 3 to 5 km radius of transit stations can help to extend the reach of a transit network Strategies networks Coordinate the identification and layout of bicycle routes with transit planning to enhance connections to transit stops and station areas Bicycle networks should comprise a range of cycling accommodations see above that together establish a continuous interconnected network throughout and between settlement areas Identify routes that are attractive to cyclists with direct connections between major destinations slower traffic speeds and volumes and or limited grade changes Avoid gaps or jogs in routes and connect existing gaps between routes over time Using contraflow bike lanes on one way streets indicated by pavement markings and clear signs can be an effective strategy to connect gaps in the bike network A dedicated bike crossing in Stockholm enables through cyclists to pass while turning cyclists are provided a place to wait for the appropriate signal Clear standardized signage will direct cyclists on the safest routes to reach their destination Signage indicating the route number as well as distances and directions to key locations within the network will assist cyclists A free bicycle pump at a transit station in Stockholm helps to support cyclists travelling to and from the station area bike ways Establish signed cycling routes leading to and from station areas within a 3 to 5 km radius of rapid or regional transit stations Where possible these routes should be dedicated curb side bike lanes or marked shared curb lanes with sufficient width to accommodate both motor vehicles and cyclists A wider bike lane should be provided when adjacent to curb side parking to allow cyclists to pass safely when drivers exit their vehicles Wider lanes may be also necessary depending on the vehicle volumes and levels of truck traffic Recommended widths are identified within the Ontario Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines Highlighting dedicated bike lanes with a solid colour may help to alert drivers of their existence and enhance user safety Lanes should be coloured with durable slip resistant and reflective material to prevent sliding when wet and improve visibility In rural settlement areas bike lanes can be created by modifying a paved shoulder to provide a signed bike lane along concession roads leading to and from stops and or station areas Appropriate widths and other features of the bike lane will vary with truck and general traffic volumes and speeds Municipalities should work with local enforcement officials to ensure that parking and stopping restrictions in bike lanes are enforced In areas where there are high levels of vehicular traffic or speed limits for example over 60 km hr the provision of segregated cycling facilities should be considered Segregation can be achieved in a number of different ways using bollards concrete islands boulevards with medians or other methods to separate and protect cyclists When choosing a treatment considerations should include location of driveways space for manoeuvring around hazards ease of maintenance and the safety of pedestrians There are a range of options for facilitating enhanced bicycle access Decisions around the appropriate form of cycling accommodation should be based on an understanding of existing and planned land use conditions traffic levels rights of way restrictions and local ridership characteristics Dedicated bike lanes adjacent to sidewalks such as this Stockholm example create a safer environment for cyclists and facilitate plowing during winter months Multi use trails can be used to provide access through natural areas infrastructure easements or open spaces Physically separated curb side bike lanes such as this example from Montreal create a safe and secure dedicated environment for cyclists along busy streets Painted curb side bike lanes such as this example from New York create a highly visible space for cyclists along busy streets Where lane widths permit shared curb lanes can be marked with sharrows a pavement marking that typically incorporates a bicycle symbol and two chevrons to indicate a shared vehicular and bicycle traffic lane Signed secondary cycling routes along local streets with lower traffic volumes are an excellent way of connecting local neighbourhoods and destinations with more dedicated cycling facilities secondary routes Provide multi use trails that are wide enough to accommodate segregated pedestrian and cyclist traffic and extend them to connect with transit facilities Recommended widths and other design features are provided in the Ontario Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines Create signed secondary cycling routes sometimes known as bicycle boulevards along lower volume streets leading to transit stops stations Bicycle boulevards are most successful where they offer a comparable alternative to larger roads in terms of travel time This can be facilitated through measures such as cyclist activated signals at major intersections Thunder Bay Cycling Education Educating motorists and cyclists on sharing the road and the proper and safe use of bikeways can help promote complete streets and support cyclist safety Thunder Bay produced a brochure on shared and dedicated bike lanes as part of its launch of active transportation routes on the City s streets Active Transportation Thunder Bay The use of bike boxes at intersections indicated by clear pavement markings can help to minimize conflicts between turning vehicles and cyclists Bike boxes should be implemented where no right turns on red are allowed and supported by public education Recommended Resources Case Study Cycling Facilities Integrating Bicycling and Public Transport in North America Pucher and Buehler Ontario Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines Ontario Ministry of Transportation Breaking Barriers to Bicycling Bicycle Lanes Best Practices and Pilot Treatments Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission Planning and Design for Pedestrians and Cyclists Vélo Québec Urban Bikeway Design Guide National Association of City Transportation Officials Fundamentals of Bicycle Boulevard Planning Design Initiative for Bicycle Pedestrian Innovation materials maintenance Construct cycling routes with smooth sturdy paving material such as asphalt or concrete Establish a regular maintenance schedule including snow clearance to ensure that all routes are clear of snow significant debris or damage year round wayfinding Create or utilize a standardized palette of street signage indicating the location of cycling facilities and distances to key destinations to promote safety wayfinding and legibility Posting cycling directions to and from major destinations within a 3 to 5 km radius of transit stations can raise awareness of cycling to transit for non cyclists Post signage along major streets directing cyclists to more bike friendly routes leading to transit stop or station areas Include cycling routes bike locker and station locations on transit maps to direct cyclists to transit facilities and support integrated transit cycling trips intersections The use of bike boxes at intersections where appropriate may help to alert drivers and minimize conflicts between turning vehicles and cyclists continuing through the intersection The use of cyclist activated crossing signals can enhance crossing points for cyclists by reducing rights of way confusion amenities The provision of bike racks lockers and cycling amenities such as air pumps and drinking fountains at key destinations along a cycling route can help to support travel to and from station areas and facilitate quick convenience stops This can be implemented through private sector partnerships and development agreements streetscape improvement programs or during the upgrade of transit facilities Enhance cyclist safety and prevent falls resulting from bicycle tires catching in grooves or gaps in the route by upgrading railway crossings and using drainage grates with narrow gaps arranged perpendicular to the curb Establish minimum bike parking requirements in zoning by laws that outline requirements for different uses Establish standards for the amount of bike parking and provision of other amenities which relate to development type size and or number of vehicle parking spaces Generally retail or commercial uses will require more short term parking while office and residential uses will require more secure facilities 2 2 4 Accommodating Buses in Mixed Traffic Working within an understanding of the planned local and regional transit network arterials and collectors should be designed to accommodate transit vehicles in a manner that enhances efficiency and ease of use while balancing the needs of pedestrians cyclists and motorized vehicles For the majority of regions and municipalities transit is accommodated on the streets within a limited rights of way that is shared by other users The way in which these streets are designed can have a significant impact on the operation of vehicles enabling efficient travel enhancing boarding conditions for passengers minimizing conflicts with other users and enabling the provision of higher order transit in dedicated corridors over time Given the higher number of users per vehicle it makes sense to provide both room and priority for transit vehicles within a street Small streets that aren t designed to accommodate transit and streets that accommodate transit as an afterthought can result in increased travel time poor user experience and safety issues A contraflow lane in west London permits buses to travel along a consistent linear route north and south through the city Strategies physical design Design designated transit routes to accommodate transit by providing limited grade changes adequate lane widths and turning radii Design standards should balance the needs of other users such as pedestrians and cyclists for example by incorporating minimum turning radii at intersections and adequate space for cyclists within the rights of way Ensure roads being used as bus routes conform to design standards for local collector roads which govern surface and subsurface materials and depths Avoid one way street systems that result in looped transit service These can be confusing and inconvenient for transit users Where this is an issue consider the conversion of the street from a one way to two way street or the provision of a contraflow lane Contraflow lanes can be effective for express buses with no stops in the contraflow lane short distances without stops used to connect route gaps or on roads with traffic islands to accommodate stops The use of bus bays should be carefully considered depending on the circumstances Bus bays can interfere with cyclists result in increased street widths which affects pedestrian crossings and can make it difficult for buses to re enter traffic in congested conditions Installation of bus bays may be appropriate under the following circumstances Locations that are major trip generators where the bus could be stopped for a significant amount of time to load and unload passengers Locations where there are specific safety and capacity concerns with the bus being stopped in a traffic lane At large scale arterials considering BRT service Far side stops at intersections are preferred supported by queue jump lanes for transit vehicles and signal priority where possible Contraflow lanes on one way streets can help to provide efficient service along transit corridors that is easy to understand for users Ontario s Highway Traffic Act requires drivers to yield the right of way to buses leaving bus bays to merge with traffic However buses can still experience difficulty re entering traffic from the bus bay when traffic is backed up Recommended Resources Transit Friendly Streets Design and Traffic Management Strategies to Support Livable Communities Transportation Research Board Geometric Design Guide for Canadian Roads Transportation Association of Canada Geometric Design Standards for Ontario Highways Ontario Ministry of Transportation Ontario Bikeways Planning and Design Guidelines Ontario Ministry of Transportation safety for cyclists When transit vehicles will be sharing the street with cyclists provide a curb lane wide enough to allow buses to pass cyclists safely The appropriate lane width will vary depending on truck and general traffic volumes and

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    4 2 surface parking Discourage or limit provision of free surface parking in station areas where frequent feeder transit service is available in order to support local transit ridership and make more land available near the station for higher density development and a mix of transit supportive uses Guideline 2 5 2 The creation or expansion of parking areas must measure the benefits of new ridership against the associated costs including construction and maintenance neighbourhood impacts and impacts on more local transit services Where possible opportunities to increase access to station areas through transfers or more active forms of transportation should be prioritized The creation of a primary central access route can consolidate entrance points and create a clear structure for pedestrian and cycling infrastructure leading to and from the station Organizing large areas of surface parking into smaller modules can facilitate access for all users while establishing future development parcels for intensification over time In this diagram taxi and drop off and pick up areas have been located to feed directly onto the station plaza while accessible parking and parking for smaller vehicles and or shared vehicles has been given priority immediately adjacent to the station Where densities are low and the ability to provide feeder bus service is limited provision of parking can encourage longer distance and inter regional transit ridership Once parking is in place patterns of use should be monitored Guideline 3 2 2 to determine rider catchment areas and identify opportunities for new feeder service or pedestrian and or cycling infrastructure as demand increases over time Where parking is provided allocate priority spots and establish free or preferential pricing for carpool vehicles scooters and motorcycles which use less space per person Guideline 2 5 2 Structure surface parking lots to create a clear pattern of circulation that can minimize pedestrian cyclist and vehicular conflicts supports safe pedestrian access from parking areas and enable the intensification of station areas over time Strategies include creating a primary central access route between the public rights of way and the station entrance that can act as the principle vehicular point of access and accommodate pedestrian and cycling infrastructure such as sidewalks and bike lanes leading to and from the station organizing large areas of surface parking into smaller parking areas of 300 cars or less separated by a landscaped buffer and pedestrian pathways This can help to break up large expanses of parking and facilitate pedestrian travel from parking areas to the station aligning parking aisles in the direction of the station to reduce the need for pedestrians to cross parking aisles or between rows of parked cars Explore opportunities for reduced parking size dimensions and parking aisle requirements that can help to minimize land requirements A rendering of potential station improvements around a commuter rail station illustrates how the creation of a central access point with pedestrian and cycling amenities can help to create safer pedestrian and cycling access across the parking lot to the station Pedestrians in commuter parking lots tend to walk directly to and from the station and may not use pedestrian pathways and sidewalks provided when there is a more direct route from their vehicle Aligning parking aisles in the direction of the station reduces the need for pedestrians to cross parking aisles or pass between parked vehicles Recommended Resources Mobility Hub Guidelines Metrolinx Bus Rapid Transit Volume 2 Implementation Guidelines Transit Cooperative Research Program Warwick Intermodal Station State of Rhode Island Department of Transportation parking structures Situate parking structures where they will not impede the long term redevelopment and intensification potential of the station area Guideline 2 4 3 drop off pickup Provide dedicated taxi areas and passenger drop off and pick up areas adjacent to the station building or associated station open space Strategy 2 3 3 6 Taxi stands should be accessible Strategy 2 5 2 8 clearly delineated from other drop off pick up areas and designed for one way traffic flow with room for waiting cars to queue Passenger drop off and pick up areas should be designed to support frequent vehicle turnover and minimize conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles Include anti idling provisions Safety can be enhanced through the provision of a curbed sidewalk adjacent to the passenger door Where dedicated curb side drop off is not feasible these areas should be designed as shared pedestrian vehicular spaces through the use of special paving or markings designed to enhance driver awareness 2 3 3 Enhancing Access for Pedestrians in Station Areas Transit stations and station areas should be designed to prioritize pedestrian access while accommodating the needs of other users such as cyclists transit and motor vehicles The movement of people in and around stations or transferring between different transportation modes requires an emphasis on design of the pedestrian realm Transit stations and station areas should have adequate capacity to accommodate peak pedestrian volumes safely and comfortably While efforts may be made to support pedestrian movement on the way to the station if provisions are not made for pedestrians within the unique environment of a station it can affect user satisfaction and deter ridership Ensuring that people can move safely efficiently and comfortably within or around a station is therefore an important strategy to enhancing user experience and promoting greater ease of use The pedestrian plaza at the Stratford Station in London UK creates a receiving point for pedestrians and helps to facilitate transfers between modes Strategies pedestrian connections Treat the sidewalks in and immediately adjacent to a station as pedestrian priority areas They should contain a higher level of pedestrian amenity than surrounding areas including signage and wayfinding to inform users where they need to go to reach the station and area destinations pedestrian oriented lighting for enhanced visibility and safety seating and waste receptacles for convenience and landscaping for pedestrian comfort and enjoyment Organize sidewalks and pathways within station areas so they provide continuous direct connections to area destinations and pathways outside the station area A

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    establish parcels for future development and provide additional on street parking This surface parking lot in Portland Oregon is screened from the street includes provision for pedestrian circulation and cyclists and incorporates environmental features such as permeable paving and bio swales that can absorb and filter stormwater run off Accessible parking has been located near the principal accessible entrance Strategies parking structures Provide parking in nodes or corridors in below grade or structured parking facilities where possible to allow for higher density development and active street level uses Where feasible wrap above ground parking structures in residential retail or commercial uses to screen parking from the street and increase street level activity Providing access ramps along active street frontages or on primary pedestrian routes should be discouraged to minimize conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles To reduce the visual impact of structured parking along a street treat the façade like an active building frontage Guideline 2 4 1 Reflect the characteristics of more active building types through techniques such as screening diagonal ramps and non horizontal parking plates with horizontal banding elements screening parked cars from view through the use of walls windows or parapets and incorporating active uses at grade that can contribute to the animation and activity of the street Above ground parking structures should be wrapped with active uses to screen parking from the public realm Recommended Resources Parking Facilities National Institute of Building Sciences Design Guidelines for Greening Surface Parking Lots City of Toronto street parking Paid on street parking can minimize the need for dedicated parking spaces providing space for short stay visitors and helping to support main street retail uses On street parking adjacent to bike ways should provide an additional 0 6m of width indicated by lines or hatching to accommodate car door openings which could interfere with cyclists Guideline 2 2 4 surface parking Prohibit surface parking between a building and a street within designated nodes or corridors Where possible and costs permit particularly where there are large areas of parking design surface parking lots to include dedicated provisions for pedestrian circulation including internal walkways and pedestrian priority paving treatments Where larger areas of surface parking exist encourage the introduction of a street and block pattern within the parking lot that can help enhance pedestrian access enable the introduction of streetscape treatments and create development parcels for infill over time In designated growth areas and where higher densities are planned encourage development applications and master plans to demonstrate how large areas of surface parking can be redeveloped over time In the design of large areas of surface parking encourage the inclusion of a range of environmental features such as solar panels shade trees permeable paving and bio swales that can absorb and filter stormwater run off See Guideline 2 5 2 for other measures to address the sustainability of parking facilities 2 4 3 Intensification of Station Areas Planning for station areas should take into consideration the potential for intensification over time Station

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    Evaluate and consider reductions in minimum and maximum parking supply requirements near transit routes Establish parking supply standards appropriate to existing and planned densities mix of uses existing and planned levels of transit service and modal split Review standards on a regular basis and change as appropriate Permit off site shared and existing on street parking to count toward parking requirements planning strategies The establishment of parking improvement districts can be used to direct net or surplus revenues from paid parking lots back into the district These revenues can contribute to the development of more shared parking facilities snow removal or other parking related infrastructure Additional funding for these could be partially achieved through a cash in lieu policy on area developments 2 5 2 Priority Parking Users Encourage priority parking programs that promote a shift to higher vehicle occupancy and greater use of more efficient and sustainable modes of transportation Large cars and single occupant vehicles use more resources than smaller and more efficient alternatives both in terms of space for parking and their impact upon the environment In areas where parking spaces are limited such as station areas and around major stops giving priority to preferred users such as carpool users and vehicles that occupy less space can be a strong incentive promoting more space efficient modes of transportation If four users occupy a single parking space they are in essence freeing up three additional spaces for other users maximizing the efficiency of existing parking and minimizing the need for additional spaces The effectiveness of priority measures will be dependent on proper enforcement to ensure that priority spaces are not being occupied by unauthorized vehicles Priority measures should be assessed on a regular basis for effectiveness and enforcement strategies planned accordingly Providing incentives for more space efficient modes of transportation is inherently sustainable In addition it can be beneficial to provide priority for more environmentally friendly forms of private transportation such as bicycles hybrid vehicles or electric cars in order to promote more sustainable transportation solutions Parking spaces also need to be designed for universal access Ontario s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act 2005 will require municipalities and transit agencies to meet standards for accessible parking spaces under the Built Environment Standard Guideline 3 4 1 provides resources and links to Ontario s accessibility policies and legislation as they develop and are implemented The Dow Jones Princeton campus has 60 preferred parking spaces for cars with high miles per gallon 36 mpg or higher and carpoolers Strategies parking priority Locational priority should be given to accessible parking spaces as well as carpool and alternative energy vehicles such as hybrid or electric cars at stations and within municipally owned parking lots in and around station areas The provision of charging stations at priority locations within station areas can help support electric vehicle use This enables users to charge their vehicles while travelling via transit Where parking spaces are limited consider the provision of priority parking for cyclists scooters

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    firms and warehousing or truck transportation firms that require extensive land areas for buildings and storage further from transit Encourage employment related services retail and restaurants to co locate at intersections and next to transit stops where they can be more easily accessed by local employees and discourage lunchtime automobile trips Establish minimum density thresholds in industrial and employment areas where appropriate This can help to facilitate the provision of more cost effective transit service to these areas Coordination of access and servicing in industrial and employment areas such as this example in Vaughan can enable traditional employment buildings to be situated closer to the street Recommended Resources Urban Form Case Studies Employment Lands Ontario Growth Secretariat Transportation Demand Management for Site Plan Development Arlington County Department of Environmental Services design Orient buildings to front onto public streets as close to the street line as possible This will enhance access for pedestrians and cyclists Guideline 2 4 1 parking Discourage the provision of surface parking between the front of an employment building and the street A preferable location is side yard parking which can be shared between uses and enables buildings to be situated closer to the street access servicing The coordination of access and servicing between uses can help to enable the provision of mid block pedestrian connections providing access to companies located in the interior of industrial and employment subdivisions Vehicular access and servicing should be shared and coordinated between adjacent developments at the site planning stage to minimize driveways This will reduce the potential for conflict between vehicles pedestrians and cyclists and improve the quality of the streetscape for people travelling to and from transit stops or station areas Guideline 1 1 7 location of transit Locate transit stops and shelters in coordination with adjacent uses and building entrances to increase opportunities for natural surveillance This creates a more inviting environment for people waiting for transit Guideline 2 3 1 cycling Provide bike lockers at local transit stations and sheltered bike racks at places of employment and transit stops This can help to support employees wishing to ride from their transit stop to work or visa versa Incorporate bike racks at bus stops and key destinations in and around employment areas in order to promote cycling as an option to access services during lunch hours or throughout the day 2 6 4 Large Shopping Centres and Big Box Retail The location layout and design of large shopping centres and big box retail uses should enhance access for pedestrians cyclists and transit users while preserving for intensification that will enable the development of a node over time Large shopping centres and big box retail uses have the potential to act as significant generators of transit ridership However poor layout and design often limits transit use Most large retail centres are set back from surrounding streets and surrounded by large areas of surface parking This resulting in long walking distances between the shopping centre and nearby uses and or transit routes In many instances a lack of through streets and poor coordination between developments means that there is no coherent pattern of public streets blocks and driveways Pedestrians and transit users can be discouraged by having to traverse large parking lots to reach retail uses Additionally when direct access is provided transit vehicles must take circuitous routes increasing transit vehicle travel times While large shopping centres and big box uses should ideally be sited as close to the street or transit station as possible in many instances these uses are dependent on large numbers of auto users and require large areas of surface parking When designed carefully surface parking can enhance connectivity between shopping centres and surrounding areas increase pedestrian safety and create a pattern to support new uses and transit supportive intensification over time Planning shopping centres with a secondary network of streets and blocks can set the stage for long term intensification The use of parking structures can help to free up large areas of surface parking for new development Strategies land use Locate large shopping centres and big box retail uses in conjunction with a mix of higher density uses including employment commercial and residential uses The redevelopment of this big box retail use in St Paul MN established a pattern of streets and blocks that enhanced connections north to the corridor and will enable the gradual intensification of the site over time Recommended Resources Malls into Mainstreets Congress for New Urbanism Municipal Code Large Retail Facility Design City of Bellingham WA Central Corridor Development Strategy Section 3 3 City of Saint Paul MN layout design Locate suburban shopping centres and big box retail uses as close to the street and or transit station as possible so they can enhance pedestrian access and contribute to street level pedestrian activity At existing shopping centres reduce the effect of blank walls facing streets or key pedestrian routes through the use of retail liners composed of smaller stores that can animate the street and enhance the walk for pedestrians At large regional shopping centres which act as focal points within a transit network integrate transit facilities within the layout and design of their site Transit facilities should be situated to minimize diversions from existing transit routes provide direct dedicated pedestrian connections to the primary entrance of the shopping centre be designed to provide comfortable waiting conditions for passengers and integrate cycling facilities for transit and retail users At large shopping centres and big box retail uses that are not sited against the street edge put in place a pattern of secondary streets and blocks In the short term this will facilitate access for pedestrians cyclists and transit users and in the long term will enable intensification and a greater mix of uses This can be achieved by treating access roads and driveways as new streets with sidewalks and streetscape treatments that connect the retail uses with adjacent streets and surrounding developments aligning access roads and driveways with adjacent parcels

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    and capacity to meet community needs Planning and Performance Monitoring Monitoring and evaluating the performance of transit systems to respond to community needs Trip Planning and Navigation Enabling users to navigate the system and plan their trips Passenger Accommodation and Service Creating accessible facilities that meet customer needs while increasing user safety and comfort Ridership Strategies Developing programs and strategies to target and increase ridership Smaller communities may wish to pay particular attention to the strategies outlined in Guidelines 3 1 3 3 5 2 and 3 5 3 of this chapter Top of page Table of Contents What are these guidelines about Introduction Chapter 1 Community Wide Guidelines 1 1 Community Structure 1 2 Regional Mobility Planning Chapter 2 District Level and Site Specific Guidelines 2 1 Layout of Local Streets and Open Spaces 2 2 Creating Complete Streets 2 3 Enhancing Access to Transit 2 4 Creating a Transit Supportive Urban Form 2 5 Parking Management 2 6 Specialized Uses Chapter 3 Transit Improvement Guidelines 3 1 System Service and Operations 3 2 Planning and Performance Monitoring 3 3 Trip Planning and Navigation 3 4 Passenger Accommodation and Service 3 5 Ridership Strategies Chapter 4 Implementation Inspiring Change The Planning Process Innovative Planning Approaches Funding and Investment Appendices Appendix A Case Studies Appendix B Acknowledgements References and Photo Credits Appendix C Glossary and Index About the Ministry Minister Bio About the Ministry Service Commitment Videos Ministry Offices Sustainability Accessibility for Ontarians Printable Forms FAQ s News Ontario Newsroom News Releases New Information House Statements Events Traveller Info Highway 401 Traffic Map Road Closures Kingston Area Ferry Schedule Road Signs High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes Highway 407 ETR Weatheroffice Driver Licensing Driver and Vehicle Licensing Driver Licensing Getting an Enhanced Driver s Licence Ontario Photo Card Getting a Driver s

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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    as the service goals outlined in regional and municipal transportation master plans Evening service can help to boost overall ridership levels enabling riders to take transit during the day and return via transit in the evening Mini bus services at the Appleby GO Station in Oakville are coordinated with train arrival times to provide convenient quick transfers for passengers heading to dispersed local businesses expanding service Service frequency or vehicle capacity 30 foot to 40 foot or articulated vehicles should be increased if passenger counts exceed the transit agency s established maximum acceptable capacity Capacity may be measured in terms of average number of customers on board or percentage of seated capacity at the busiest period Bus bunching can arise due to a number of factors such as traffic congestion or difficult road conditions To avoid bus bunching transit providers should consider implementing automatic vehicle location or conditional signal control and other transit priority measures Guideline 2 2 5 especially when increasing service frequencies on routes with congestion or bad road conditions Extending or increasing service in the evenings may boost ridership during the daytime by capturing trips that start during the day but return late in the evening facilitating transfers Coordinate services and timetables between operators connecting routes when regular service changes are planned Where multiple services are being coordinated at a transit node focus coordination efforts on routes that are most heavily used and where transfers are common Arrival of the first service should occur within 10 minutes or less of the departure of the connecting service while still allowing enough time for passengers to transfer and accommodating late running vehicles Connections for services with high regular demand that serve a key destination should be scheduled for wait times of 5 minutes or less between the first service and the connecting service service review Develop a regular program of route reviews to evaluate a route s service quality and set targets for service levels frequency overcrowding and transfer wait times See more on performance monitoring in Guideline 3 2 1 York Region Transit s Service Frequency and Vehicle Loading Standards establish targets to evaluate the ridership loads and wait times York Region Transit s Service Frequency and Vehicle Loading Standards vary based on the type of transit service Bus rapid transit VIVA Routes have frequent and limited stops Base grid routes are available 7 days per week on all major east west and north south arterials Local routes serve as feeder or neighbourhood circulation that feeds to the grid network and community buses provide dial a ride service Performance data and observations should be compared to established service levels Connection wait time data may be obtained from electronic fare payment EFP systems while ridership load data for routes and route segments may be obtained from manual counts automated passenger counts EFP systems passenger surveys observations from operating staff and customer complaints and suggestions Winnipeg Transit s Maximum Seated Capacity Practice Weekday Peak 150 Off Peak 100 Winnipeg Transit establishes service target levels based on different periods of the day While off peak the standards aim to ensure that everyone can get a seat during peak periods the standards are based on an assumption that it is acceptable for up to 1 3 of riders on each bus to have to stand Recommended Resources The Canadian Transit Handbook 3rd ed Chapter 6 Canadian Urban Transit Association Traveler Response to System Changes Chapter 9 Transit Cooperative Research Program Transit Scheduling Basic and Advanced Manuals Transit Cooperative Research Program Elements Needed to Create High Ridership Transit Systems Chapter 5 Transit Cooperative Research Program reducing service If demand does not support the minimum frequency decrease frequency or vehicle capacity and invest operating savings on other routes in need of service improvements However transit systems should be aware that reducing service frequency may further reduce ridership To maintain ridership operators should set a minimum frequency standard for routes regardless of demand Evaluate service changes regularly to ensure there is customer benefit Recognize that customers perceive each component of a transit trip differently so not all improvements are equally beneficial For example time spent waiting at a stop is considered more onerous than time spent on a moving vehicle Examples of Maximum Load Capacity Maximum numbers of riders on Toronto Transit Commission Vehicles 3 1 3 Demand Responsive Transit Services Provide demand responsive transit services for people who cannot use conventional fixed route fixed schedule transit or to serve areas where conventional transit cannot be efficiently provided Demand responsive transit refers to transit services with no formal designated routes or schedules Instead customers are picked up and dropped off at locations and times that are agreed upon by the customer and the transit agency Transit providers may provide advance reservation for pick ups and drop offs regular pre arranged trips subscription service or same day requests for service Flexible transit systems are a variation of demand responsive systems where a main route or series of stops is designated but deviations are permitted to respond to customers specific requests Demand responsive and flexible transit may be more efficient alternatives where low population densities exist or where trip making is low during certain times Demand responsive service with fully accessible vehicles is essential to providing specialized transit for persons with disabilities and others who are not able to use conventional transit This section describes strategies for improving operations of flexible and demand responsive transit services The Accessible Transportation Standard under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act will also require service improvements to specialized transit Accessibility improvements for conventional transit are described in Guideline 3 4 1 of the document In 1998 fourteen Community Support Service agencies formed a partnership called Toronto Ride to provide community transportation services for seniors to healthcare appointments programs such as adult day services social outings and shopping The agencies share resources to meet unmet rides by posting unmet rides on a shared information system and picking up rides as they

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transit/supportive-guideline/system-service-operations.shtml (2014-08-11)
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