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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    their future development including strategies for disposition phasing of development and general development characteristics Lay by Lane A designated paved area beside a road that enables vehicles to stop temporarily to drop off or pick up passengers without disrupting traffic Leap frog Development When new development is built some distance away from an existing urban area bypassing vacant parcels located closer to the city Because land prices are lower in those areas the cost of housing in these developments is also lower However because leapfrog development bypasses areas already served by public facilities it results in higher infrastructure costs to service more distant parcels of land Legibility The ease with which it is possible to read and understand something In the context of wayfinding and station design the ease with which individuals can understand their environment where they are and how to get where they want to go Light Rail Transit LRT Electric rail cars in grade separated rights of way They have lower capacity and speed than heavy rail and metro systems but higher capacity and speed than traditional street running tram systems While LRT rails are usually separated from other traffic they may also run in mixed traffic LRT vehicles are usually given signal priority at intersections Line Haul Service A cross town transit route Typically travel time for a line haul service is no more than 15 20 minutes end to end Main Street Contains a range of street oriented uses including retail cultural institutional residential personal services and employment Each main street has characteristics unique to the neighbourhood in which it belongs It is important to consider historical preservation to maintain those characteristics Major Transit Stations Focal points within a community s transit network which act as important reception areas for transit riders and places of transfer between various modes and systems Within the Greater Golden Horseshoe these may include stations and surrounding areas defined as major transit station areas or mobility hubs in the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe 2006 and The Big Move Transforming Transportation in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area 2008 Mid block Connection or Mid block Walkway Links within and across blocks that provide connections for pedestrians and cyclists They are particularly useful where there are large blocks that may take a long time to travel around Minimum Density Threshold A zoning tool that specifies the minimum allowable development density or floor area ratio The intent of minimum density thresholds is to encourage higher densities and more compact forms of development Mixed Use Development Areas characterized by a wide variety of shopping employment entertainment light industrial and residential uses Mixed use development may occur at the level of individual buildings or complexes or at a larger scale within activity nodes or corridors Mobility Aid Securement System A system used to secure a mobility aid such as a wheelchair into place to prevent undesired movement when driving or being transported in a vehicle Mobility Hubs Major transit station areas within the Greater Golden Horseshoe identified by Metrolinx as places of connectivity between regional rapid transit services local transit services and possibly inter city transportation services which have or are planned to have an intensive concentration of mixed uses such as employment residences retail services or entertainment around a major transit station Mobility hubs are located at the interchange of two or more current or planned regional rapid transit lines as identified in the Metrolinx Regional Transportation Plan These areas are generally forecasted to achieve or have the potential to achieve a minimum density of approximately 10 000 people and jobs within an 800 m radius See also Major Transit Stations in this glossary Modal Split The proportion of total person trips using each of the various different modes of transportation The proportion using any one mode is its modal split Multi Use Trails Dedicated pathways for mixed active transportation such as cycling walking and in line skating Trail networks ideally link key areas of the community and connect neighbourhoods town centres parks and schools Natural Surveillance Used in Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design CPTED models for crime prevention Natural surveillance can be facilitated by designing the placement of physical features activities and people in such a way as to maximize visibility and foster positive social interaction Natural surveillance increases the perception that people can be seen which limits the opportunity for crime Other ways to promote natural surveillance include low landscaping and installation of street lights Nodes Areas within settlement areas of more intense density mixed use and activity They are compact clusters of uses that may include downtowns mixed use communities clusters of office buildings post secondary educational campuses or other higher density areas both large and small Guideline 1 1 2 Within the Greater Golden Horseshoe these may include areas defined as urban growth centres major transit station areas anchor hubs or gateway hubs in the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe 2006 and The Big Move Transforming Transportation in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area 2008 Open Spaces Open Space Network Open spaces are parks plazas green spaces natural areas or bicycle walking trails when linked together they are open space networks Park and Ride Park and rides are car parking lots that offer transit users a place to park their car then transfer to a public transit service to complete their journey They are typically used in suburban locations where distances to transit service are longer Park and ride facilities should be visible from and located along heavily used commuter routes Parking Improvement Districts A way to funnel parking meter funds back into the community through streetscape improvements increased security measures and improvements that promote walking and public transportation use Pedestrian Refers to all people on foot or moving at walking speed including those who use mobility aids wheelchairs scooters etc those with strollers and buggies and people with limited mobility Pedestrian District Characterized by high levels of pedestrian activity where pedestrians are prioritized over other forms of movement Some municipalities designate pedestrian districts through zoning restricting or eliminating vehicular travel in the area It can be a neighbourhood node or corridor within a community and typically contains a high mix of uses which contribute to the higher levels of pedestrian activity Pedestrian Oriented Lighting Street lights installed at a lower height than arterial street lighting to improve walkway illumination for pedestrian traffic and enhance community safety Typically this lighting is positioned over the sidewalk rather than the street at about 4 to 6 m above the ground Pedestrian Pathway Paved walkways that are lit and accessible for users of different abilities Pedestrian pathways can also be underground creating indoor connections between buildings and destinations Pedestrian Plaza A type of public space that can act as an important organizing element in a dense urban environment Within a station area pedestrian plazas can facilitate transfers between modes act as a receiving point for pedestrians and contain a range of services and amenities for transit users Pedestrian Through Zone A section of sidewalk reserved for pedestrians Sidewalks comprise four zones curb furnishings pedestrian and frontage The curb zone abuts the street and provides a buffer between the sidewalk and the street The furnishings zone lies between the curb zone and pedestrian through zone and provides a location for benches bus shelters and other amenities such as trash receptacles bicycle racks and lighting The pedestrian through zone is the sidewalk space kept clear for walking and is located between the furnishings zone and the frontage zone The pedestrian through zone should be clear of obstructions at all times Finally the frontage zone provides a transition between the building or property line and the pedestrian through zone It may feature furniture and act as a patio Permeability The degree to which pedestrians can see inside or physically enter buildings or sites A permeable façade or site helps create a more animated and safe environment Place making Building on a local community s assets to create spaces that attract people to the area and make a place memorable and enjoyable for example the addition of parks plazas or public space features which encourage members of the community to meet relax play and engage with each other Proof of Payment System Drivers are not responsible for collecting and inspecting every fare with this system Instead fare inspectors randomly check passenger transit tickets passes and transfer stubs and issue fines to those who do not present them Proof of payment systems speed up boarding and reduce dwell times as passengers can enter through any door of the vehicle provided they have valid proof of fare payment However fare evasion under such a system can be an issue if not enforced Public Civic Infrastructure Large scale infrastructure such as highway interchanges bridges and utility easements Public Realm All spaces to which the public has unrestricted access such as streets parks and sidewalks Queue Jump Lanes Short roadway lanes provided on the approaches to signalized intersections which allow buses or cyclists to by pass queued traffic and enter the intersection before other traffic when the traffic light turns green Redevelopment The creation of new units uses or lots on previously developed land in existing communities including brownfield sites Region Regional Municipality An upper tier municipality comprising a number of local or area municipalities which carries out regional scale planning functions Counties or district municipalities which undertake planning functions are also included in this definition Reserved Bus Lanes Traffic lanes designated for bus use only that are marked and signed differently from adjacent lanes but are not physically separated from them Residential Employment Balance Refers to the distribution of employment relative to the distribution of workers within a given geographic area Real Time Trip Planning Information Reflects travel conditions as they actually occur To achieve this vehicle location and expected travel times must be updated every few minutes or seconds Reverse Lotting Lots located adjacent to an arterial or collector road which front onto an internal street while the rear yard faces onto the arterial or collector road Landscaping and privacy fences are usually located adjacent to the arterial or collector road and access onto the arterial or collector is strictly limited Right of Way Land that is reserved usually through legal designation for transportation and or utility purposes such as for a trail hydro corridor rail line street or highway A right of way is often reserved for the maintenance or expansion of existing services A permit or legal permission is generally required for any work or encroachment on a right of way Roads Arterial and Collector Major traffic pedestrian cycling and transit routes intended to carry larger volumes of vehicular traffic providing continuous access across neighbourhoods Roads Local Roads designed to carry low traffic volumes at low speeds which are intended primarily to provide access to abutting uses rather than to provide through traffic routes Screening Landscaping can be used as a strategy to screen or mask parking lots or other visually unappealing elements of the urban landscape Care should be taken to ensure that screening does not affect pedestrian safety Secondary Plan A land use policy plan for a district or large neighbourhood within a municipality which provides more detailed land use policies and designations than those found in a municipal official plan Segregated Cycling Facilities Segregated cycling facilities are lanes tracks or paths designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is excluded by means of physical barriers e g bollards or curbs medians Self contained communities These communities have a mix of uses that allow people to live work shop and recreate without having to travel beyond the community They also have a range of housing types employment retail open spaces and community facilities Semi Public Areas Extend from the edge of a building to the public sidewalk These areas are outside the public right of way and form part of the building s property but are accessible to the public Gardens fountains seating areas and kiosks with small outdoor dining areas are all types of semi public amenities to consider for this zone with the understanding that these may be closed or cordoned off during certain hours Settlement areas Urban areas and rural settlement areas within municipalities that are built up areas where development is concentrated and which have a mix of land uses and lands which have been designated in an official plan for development over the long term planning horizon Signal Priority A traffic signal control scheme which triggers a traffic signal to turn green in the direction that a transit vehicle is travelling as the vehicle approaches the intersection Since transit vehicles hold many people giving priority to transit can potentially increase the number of people that can move through an intersection There are different types of signal priority Passive priority strategies use timed coordinated signals in the area wide traffic signal timing scheme Active priority strategies involve detecting the presence of a transit vehicle and giving the transit vehicle priority Each transit vehicle has an on board transmitter that prompts the signal to give an early green signal or hold a green signal that is already active Also see Transit Signal Priority in this glossary Real time control strategies can consider not only the presence of a transit vehicle but also the adherence to schedule and the volume of traffic One common strategy is to give priority only to late buses This strategy optimizes schedule adherence rather than running time Smart Card Plastic cards usually the size of a credit card with an embedded microchip that can be loaded with data These are used in Electronic Fare Payment EFP systems Specialized Transit A door to door service for passengers with special needs Specialized transit riders must meet specified eligibility criteria and are required to book their trips in advance Spill out Space The area between the building or property line and the pedestrian through zone Spill out spaces often allow restaurants and cafes to provide outdoor seating for their customers Spill out spaces help animate the public realm creating a more inviting environment for pedestrians Street Intersection Density This is a measure of walkable communities and is determined by calculating the number of intersections in a given area Typically the more intersections per area the greater the degree of connectivity and route options available Streetscape The elements of a street including the road buildings street furniture trees and open spaces that define its character Streetscapes can be divided into different types depending on type intensity of land use primary user groups and built form character Streetscaping is the application of various elements found within the streetscape to support the unique character and function of an area Structured Parking An above or below grade structure designed to accommodate vehicle parking Transit Transit refers primarily to the public transit systems including specialized transit operated by or on behalf of municipal regional or provincial governments or transit authorities and includes all transit modes such as buses streetcars light rail and commuter rail lines In this document the term transit may also include transportation vehicles such as vans ferries or taxis used to supplement transit service Transit Oriented Development A planning approach that calls for high density mixed use business residential neighbourhood centers to be clustered around transit stations and corridors Transit oriented development is focused within an 800 m radius of transit stops with the highest intensity and mix of land uses concentrated within 400 m or adjacent to the station A transit supportive approach to land use planning urban design and transit operations may include transit oriented development as well as a variety of other strategies that make transit viable and improve the quality of the experience of using transit These may be implemented near transit stops or stations or at a broader scale as appropriate See transit supportive Transit Signal Priority TSP Gives transit vehicles priority at traffic signals by adjusting signal duration to minimize the transit vehicle delay Signal priority may be manually activated by the driver with a switch or automatically through the use of an Automatic Vehicle Location system Also see signal priority Transit Supportive Makes transit viable and improves the quality of the experience of using transit When used in reference to development it often refers to compact mixed use development that has a high level of employment and residential densities to support frequent transit service When used in reference to urban design it often refers to design principles that make development more accessible for transit users such as roads laid out in a grid network rather than a discontinuous network pedestrian friendly built environment along roads to encourage walking to transit reduced setbacks and placing parking at the sides rear of buildings and improved access between arterial roads and interior blocks in residential areas Transportation Demand Management TDM A set of strategies that results in more efficient use of the transportation system by influencing travel behaviour by mode time of day frequency trip length regulation route or cost Examples include carpooling vanpooling and shuttle buses parking management site design and on site facilities that support transit and walking bicycle facilities and programs pricing road tolls or transit discounts flexible working hours telecommuting high occupancy vehicle lanes park and ride incentives for ride sharing using transit walking and cycling initiatives to discourage drive alone trips by residents employees visitors and students Urban Boundaries An urban growth boundary circumscribes an entire urbanized area and is used by governments as a guide to zoning and land use decisions In a rural context the terms town boundary village curtilage or village envelope may be used to apply the same principles Vanpool Centre to Centre Bus A form of public transportation which acts as a cross between a private taxi and a public bus Vanpools or centre to centre buses follow a fixed route but have a flexible schedule and the driver can make

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transit/supportive-guideline/appendix-c.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Transit-Supportive Guidelines
    to enhance the service and operational characteristics of transit systems to make them more attractive to potential transit users The strategies case studies and resources presented in these guidelines are to be used at the discretion of municipalities and other planning authorities as an important reference in their planning and decision making processes The guidelines are not a statement of provincial policy but present ways of meeting the objective of building transit supportive communities in support of provincial policies and directions Understanding that circumstances will vary from place to place it is expected that municipalities will adapt these guidelines and examples to their own individual situations and develop solutions and approaches beyond those provided here In implementing these strategies municipalities are responsible for ensuring that they comply with any applicable legislation policy or standards Top of page Table of Contents What are these guidelines about Introduction Chapter 1 Community Wide Guidelines 1 1 Community Structure 1 2 Regional Mobility Planning Chapter 2 District Level and Site Specific Guidelines 2 1 Layout of Local Streets and Open Spaces 2 2 Creating Complete Streets 2 3 Enhancing Access to Transit 2 4 Creating a Transit Supportive Urban Form 2 5 Parking Management 2 6 Specialized Uses Chapter 3 Transit Improvement Guidelines 3 1 System Service and Operations 3 2 Planning and Performance Monitoring 3 3 Trip Planning and Navigation 3 4 Passenger Accommodation and Service 3 5 Ridership Strategies Chapter 4 Implementation Inspiring Change The Planning Process Innovative Planning Approaches Funding and Investment Appendices Appendix A Case Studies Appendix B Acknowledgements References and Photo Credits Appendix C Glossary and Index About the Ministry Minister Bio About the Ministry Service Commitment Videos Ministry Offices Sustainability Accessibility for Ontarians Printable Forms FAQ s News Ontario Newsroom News Releases New Information House Statements Events Traveller

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/transit/supportive-guideline/guidelines-about.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • Backgrounder, September 23, 2013
    be supported by a Secretariat which will Include a Director of Research and Operations an Executive Assistant a Project Manager and potentially up to 3 part time researchers Have dedicated office space for up to 8 people as well as access to a board room and other resources Staff from the Ministry of Transportation the Ministry of Finance the Ministry of Infrastructure Cabinet Office and other key ministries as applicable will provide support for and analysis to the Secretariat As the analysis of the Metrolinx Investment Strategy recommendations is developed The Panel could seek technical advice and feedback from external experts as needed Expertise could potentially be leveraged from industry experts engineers value planners economists former officials etc Approach to Advisory Panel High Profile Stakeholder Engagement Advisory Panel members have been identified from key stakeholder groups e g associations and advocacy groups etc The Panel will be composed of 13 members and will be chaired by Anne Golden Past President CEO of The Conference Board of Canada and Distinguished Visiting Scholar and Special Advisor at Ryerson University The Chair will be supported by a Vice Chair Paul Bedford Adjunct Professor of Urban Regional Planning University of Toronto and former Toronto Chief Planner The Panel members include Chair Anne Golden Ryerson University Vice Chair Paul Bedford University of Toronto Pat Dillon Provincial Building Construction Trades Council of Ontario Andy Manahan Residential and Civil Construction Alliance of Ontario Teresa Di Felice Canadian Automobile Association Cherise Burda Pembina Institute Leith Moore Ontario Home Builders Association Joe Mancinelli Labourers International Union of North America Mohan Nadarajah Citizen Member Gordon Chong former Toronto City Councillor Kulvir Gill Citizen Member Blake Hutcheson Oxford Properties Iain Dobson Real Estate Search Corporation A wide range of stakeholders has been identified so that various viewpoints and areas of expertise can be leveraged e g financial economic governance planning etc A consultant with the appropriate expertise and resources has been hired to organize and facilitate The Panel and public meetings Timing and Advisory Panel Meetings Advisory Panel meetings will take place over the fall of 2013 with the objective of having the process wrapped up by December 15 2013 The internal Panel meetings would be organized with the Minister of Transportation and or delegate Deputy Minister or Assistant Deputy Minister This would create an opportunity for the Minister to provide an overview of the desired outcomes of The Panel and parameters to guide the panellists discussions as well as to present new ideas and analysis A possible framework for The Panel Introductory Orientation Meeting The Premier and Minister of Transportation would attend the first internal session with The Panel Discuss the goals and objectives of The Panel and the scope i e that The Panel should engage in a discussion about all possible revenue options Update Meetings Updates for The Panel regarding analysis and additional options to introduce into the public discussion Updates from The Panel regarding public input and feedback from sessions Final Report Back Meeting Report back to

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/news/backgrounder/transit-investment-2013-09-23.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • IRP Carrier Manual - Overview
    however a regular Ontario plate must be obtained and displayed on Commercial vehicles used solely within the Province of Ontario or Recreational vehicles used for personal pleasure or travel by an individual or family or Commercial vehicles displaying restrictive plates which have geographic area distance or commodity restrictions or Trailers Due to jurisdictional statutes and regulations some exemptions may not be recognized A carrier should check with a jurisdiction prior to conducting operations in that jurisdiction 3 Types of Operations For Hire Carriers An individual or company whose business or undertaking is the transportation of goods property or equipment of others and includes the transportation of passengers for compensation or gain Please refer to Buses for more details Private Carriers A private carrier is an individual or company whose business or undertaking is the transportation of its own goods property or equipment and includes the transportation of passengers that is not for compensation or gain Please refer to Buses for more details Household Goods Carriers A private or for hire carrier that specializes in the transportation of household goods including the personal effects of a household new furniture and appliances Daily Rental A carrier that rents its vehicles to other carriers for periods not exceeding 30 days Buses Regular routes apportionment is a requirement under IRP for all buses travelling regularly scheduled routes At the option of the registrant total distance may be the sum of all actual in jurisdiction distance or a sum equal to the scheduled route distances per jurisdiction from the farthest point of origin to the farthest point of destination of the route schedule Charters buses used exclusively for the transportation of chartered parties may require apportioned registration under IRP however most IRP jurisdictions allow charter buses access without IRP registration or trip permits Charter bus operators should check with the jurisdictions into which they wish to operate prior to departure to verify each jurisdiction s requirements Private apportionment is required under IRP for all buses used exclusively for the transportation of passengers not for compensation or gain Household Goods Carriers Leased Equipment Based Outside Ontario Household Goods Carriers using equipment leased from service representatives other household goods movers may elect to base such equipment in the base jurisdiction of the service representative or that of the carrier If the service representative s base jurisdiction is selected the equipment shall be registered in the service representative s name and the Household Goods Carrier shall be indicated as lessee The apportionment of fees shall be according to the combined distance records of the service representative and those of the carrier Such records must be kept or made available in the service representative s base jurisdiction Leased Equipment Based in Ontario If the base jurisdiction of the Household Goods Carrier is selected the equipment shall be registered in the name of the carrier for Licence and Insurance Purposes Only The apportionment of fees shall be according to the distance records of the carrier and the records must be kept or made available in Ontario Owned Equipment For equipment owned and operated by owner operators other than service representatives and used exclusively to transport cargo for a Household Goods Carrier based in Ontario the equipment shall be registered in the carrier s name for Licence and Insurance Purposes Only The apportionment of fees shall be according to the distance records of the carrier and the records must be kept or made available in Ontario Rental Vehicles For the purposes of IRP the following definitions are applicable to Rental Vehicles Rental Owner an owner principally engaged in renting one or more rental fleets to others or offering for rental the vehicles of such fleets without drivers Rental Fleet one or more vehicles which are rented or offered for rental without drivers and which are designated by a rental owner as a rental fleet Rental Vehicle a vehicle that is part of a rental fleet Renting and Leasing the giving of possession and control of a vehicle for compensation for a specified period Rental Transaction for the rental of a vehicle shall be deemed to occur in the jurisdiction where such vehicle first comes into possession of the user Rental Vehicle Base Jurisdiction the jurisdiction from or in which the vehicle is most frequently dispatched garaged serviced maintained operated or otherwise controlled Rental Fleets The IRP specifically provides for the registration of various types of rental fleets Rental Fleets owned by any individual or firm engaging in the business of renting vehicles with or without drivers for valuable consideration for a specific period shall be extended full inter or intra jurisdictional privileges providing that Such person or firm has received either the appropriate approval from the jurisdiction to apportion such rental fleet and The operational records of the fleet are maintained by the rental owner and must be identifiable as being part of such fleet and Such vehicles are part of a rental fleet which are identifiable as being a part of such fleet and must include the specified number of vehicles and Such person or firm registers the vehicles as described below 3 8 1 Trucks and Truck Tractors Regular apportioned registration is required 3 8 2 Rental Passenger Cars Passenger vehicle rental companies operating in more than one member IRP jurisdiction must register a percentage of their rental fleet in Ontario based on the gross revenue earned for rentals in Ontario To calculate divide the gross revenue for passenger car rental received in the preceding year by Ontario based rental locations by the total gross revenue for passenger car rental transactions received in the preceding year occurring in all member IRP jurisdictions where the company has passenger car rental locations The resulting percentage shall be applied to the total number of rental passenger cars owned by the company in order to determine the actual number of rental passenger cars that shall be plated and pay full licence fees in Ontario 3 8 3 One Way Allocated Rental Vehicles Trucks

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/irp/manual/sec_1-4.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • IRP Carrier Manual - How to Apply
    2133 Toronto 1860 Wilson Avenue Downsview ON M9M 3A7 416 212 9409 416 212 9443 Waterloo 500 Weber Street North Unit 3 Waterloo ON N2L 4E9 519 885 3403 519 885 9937 Windsor 150 Ouellette Place Suite 210 Windsor ON N8X 1L9 519 972 8866 519 972 8341 New Registrations Before a vehicle may be registered under IRP in the Province of Ontario the carrier must Have an established place of business in the Province see Appendix F Glossary An Established Place of Business questionnaire with accompanying documentation is required at the time of registration To receive a copy in Word format send an e mail to irp ontario ca or download a printable version in PDF format Established Place of Business Questionnaire PDF 162 KB Complete and submit all IRP Fleet and IRP Vehicle Applications in full see Appendix B for forms completion First time registrants without distance experience may estimate distances based on the proposed operation of the fleet during the year for which registration is required The carrier will be required to substantiate the estimate by submitting an Estimated Distance Declaration form This form is required whenever providing estimate mileage on new applications renewals or when adding jurisdictions during the registration period Trip permit operations are included in the total estimated distances Submit a copy of the Bill of Sale or Lease Agreement showing the capital cost and the lease start date of the vehicle see following Points to Remember for each vehicle Submit the vehicle registration permit Provide any other documentation that is deemed necessary according to Ontario law including safety standards certificates vehicle emission certificates and letters of authorization if required Applications are processed in the order in which they are received Once an application has been processed an invoice will be faxed to the carrier The carrier may make the payment directly to an IRP Office or at the IRP Program Office If travel is intended in both Canadian and US jurisdictions payment will be required in both Canadian and US funds Once the invoice has been paid the carrier will receive A set of apportioned plates which have PRP embossed on the left hand side if necessary A validation sticker A vehicle permit and A cab card for each vehicle These credentials will be available from your local IRP Office NOTE The new policy will require all new carriers to pay IRP fees by certified cheque cash money order bank draft or credit card Canadian funds only until the end of their first full 12 month registration year Existing carriers that issue an NSF cheque on or after March 31 2008 will also be required to pay IRP fees by certified cheque cash money order bank draft or credit card Canadian funds only until the end of their first full 12 month registration year For the affected carriers regular business cheques will no longer be accepted as a form of payment until the carrier has completed a full 12 month registration year For

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/irp/manual/sec_5.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • IRP Carrier Manual - Renewals & Supplemental Applications
    from your local IRP Office or the IRP Program Office but supplies are limited Carriers using the electronic application for renewals are reminded to include vehicles to be deleted from the fleet on separate Form 4 s with the appropriate vehicle transaction code DV beside each vehicle 7 Supplemental Applications What is a Supplemental Application The carrier submits a supplemental application after the original renewal application has been processed Supplemental applications are submitted using the IRP application forms see Appendix B for forms completion Number each supplemental application beginning with 001 The number 000 is assigned to new fleets and renewal applications only When do you need to submit a Supplemental Application You must submit a supplemental application for the following transactions Add a Vehicle s Vehicles may be added to an existing fleet anytime during the registration year The distance information provided with your original application will be used to calculate the fees due Delete a Vehicle s Vehicles may be deleted from an existing fleet anytime during the registration year To delete a vehicle s from your fleet the cab card s plate s and vehicle permit s plate portion must accompany the application See Refund Policy at end of this section Transfer a Vehicle s from one Fleet to another Fleet Vehicles may be transferred between fleets using two application forms clearly showing the vehicle being deleted from one fleet and being added to another fleet Both fleets must be in the carrier s name Credit will be given for the Ontario fees only Other Canadian provinces will provide refunds however US jurisdictions generally do not refund fees For more information please consult the Refunds section Replace a Vehicle s Fleet vehicle s may be replaced anytime during the registration year In order to apply the credits from the previous vehicle s to the new vehicle s the information must be provided on the same supplement The previous cab card and vehicle permit must accompany the application The transaction code is AR DR This code must be indicated in Section A and B of Form 4 The information for the vehicle being removed from the fleet is indicated in Section C Please see the forms completion section for more information Change Vehicle Information You may apply for a change of vehicle information anytime during the registration year Changes may include a change of Unit Number a correction to the VIN Vehicle Identification Number a correction of vehicle type or a correction to the taxable owner information etc The previous cab card and vehicle permit must accompany the application Increase Decrease Vehicle Weight in a Jurisdiction A change to vehicle weight may be done at anytime during the registration year If the gross vehicle weight is increased you will be billed for any difference in registration fees If decreased you may be refunded for any difference in registration fees However various jurisdictions do not provide refunds for weight decreases during the registration year Contact the jurisdictions directly for

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/irp/manual/sec_6-7.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • IRP Carrier Manual - Fees & Refunds
    and breakdown for fees and tax where applicable per jurisdiction how that fee is distributed among the jurisdictions and the combined total payments due for all vehicles recorded on all Vehicle Summary sheets in the application Should be checked in detail against your original application to ensure that All requested jurisdictions are listed Declared total kilometres per jurisdiction are accurate Distances have been correctly recorded as Actual or Estimated 1 st or 2 nd Year The Vehicle Summary Shows the breakdown of fees and tax where applicable per vehicle how that fee is distributed among the jurisdictions and the total due for that individual vehicle Should be checked in detail against your original application to ensure That all requested units are listed that all vehicle information such as unit number VIN purchase price and purchase date etc is correctly listed check your renewal application to ensure we have the correct information or if you are processing a supplemental application contact your IRP Office for verification that the gross vehicle weights for each vehicle is correctly listed If you should find any discrepancies in information please contact the office that processed your application immediately Payment Payments due are listed on the Jurisdiction Summary only They are identified in both Canadian and US funds Do not remit funds for any amounts listed on the Vehicle Summary sheets These are subtotals only and have already been included in the Total Amount Due portion of the Invoice Summary If travel is intended in both Canadian and US jurisdictions payment must be submitted in Canadian funds for Canadian fees and US funds for US fees Payment made by personal cheque must be certified Company cheques are acceptable if the carrier information is pre printed on the cheques Please make your cheque s payable to the Minister of Finance MTO Cash payment may also be made for Canadian and US fees Credit cards can be used for payment of Canadian fees ONLY Please see the four pages that follow for examples of the Jurisdiction Summary and the Vehicle Summary NOTE Any NSF amount owing must be paid by cash certified cheque money order or credit card Effective March 31 2008 the ministry introduced a new cheque acceptance policy for the IRP Program The new policy will require all new carriers to pay IRP fees by certified cheque cash money order bank draft or credit card Canadian funds only until the end of their first full 12 month registration year Existing carriers that issue an NSF cheque on or after March 31 2008 will also be required to pay IRP fees by certified cheque cash money order bank draft or credit card Canadian funds only until the end of their next full 12 month registration year For the affected carriers regular business cheques will no longer be accepted as a form of payment until the carrier has completed a full 12 month registration year This policy also applies to permitting companies paying fees for a carrier requiring

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/irp/manual/sec_8-10.shtml (2014-08-11)
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  • IRP Carrier Manual - Temporary Permits & Record Keeping
    a paper permit issued for a commercial motor vehicle owned or leased by a resident of Ontario or of another jurisdiction and is issued under the provisions of Section 910 of the IRP Plan A vehicle displaying the permit is temporarily exempt from IRP registration The purpose of this permit is to authorize the temporary operation of an unladen commercial motor vehicle or combination unladen commercial motor vehicle and unladen trailer s within Ontario and all IRP member jurisdictions when the registered vehicle owner i e owner operator has terminated his her current employment and is seeking employment with another carrier and under the following conditions frit unladen commercial motor vehicles without plates or fit unladen commercial motor vehicle and unladen trailer or trailers without plates The fee for the unladen weight permit is 15 00 for a period of 10 days 12 Distance Operational Records Every carrier who registers vehicles under the IRP must maintain records to substantiate the reported distances travelled and the costs of all vehicles in the IRP fleets Source Documents Vehicle Costs Acceptable documentation to support a vehicle s purchase price and date of purchase include a purchase invoice and bill of sale For leased units the lease agreements showing the capital cost of the vehicle or other proof of the fair market value of the vehicle dealer appraisal at the beginning of the lease are required Costs of any capital additions and modifications made to the vehicle within 30 days of the purchase must be included in the purchase price For vehicles purchased privately MTO will use the greater of the declared purchase price or the appraised value Driver s Trip Records An acceptable source document to record distances is an Individual Vehicle Distance Record IVDR The driver for each trip made by a vehicle in an IRP fleet including owner operated vehicles and leased vehicles completes this document The most common IVDRs are the driver s trip sheets and driver s logs Other similar records are acceptable provided they contain the following basic information Registrant s name Date of trip beginning and ending Trip origin and destination Routes highway numbers travelled Odometer hubometer readings Distance by jurisdiction Total trip distance Vehicle unit numbers for both power unit and trailer s Fleet number if registrant has more than one fleet Driver s name and signature Special Permits Copies of all special permits obtained for operations by prorated vehicles must be available on file The distances travelled under these permits are to be reported on the next application for IRP registration as estimate values Monthly Summaries The IVDR information must be summarized on a monthly basis The summary must contain information by individual vehicle beginning and ending odometer hubometer readings individual trip details distance by jurisdiction total distance travelled and by fleet distance by jurisdiction total distance See Appendix E Yearly Summaries A yearly summary is required for each July 1 to June 30 reporting period and must show the total fleet distance broken down

    Original URL path: http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/irp/manual/sec_11-13.shtml (2014-08-11)
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