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  • Intergovernmental Relations
    Base Ontario and the federal government share common bases for personal and corporate income taxes and the HST which simplify the process of filing tax returns Proposed federal changes on income splitting and Tax Free Savings Accounts would affect the shared personal income tax base because Ontario would probably mirror these changes to maintain similarity These two proposals alone could result in 1 3 billion less revenue for Ontario per year Additionally Ontario parallels certain federal tax provisions for businesses such as the base of the federal Scientific Research and Experimental Development tax credit to reduce the complexity of the tax system and minimize administrative and compliance costs Federal changes to these tax measures affect both Ontario businesses and the province s tax system and should only be done in consultation with the province Changes to Canada s Criminal Code Responsibility for the Criminal Code rests with the federal government while responsibility for implementation lies mainly with provinces Changes to federal crime legislation can place further demands on the provincial court and corrections system adding to the fiscal burden on provinces For example as outlined in Chapter 14 Justice Sector the new tough on crime legislation is expected to result in ongoing costs of 22 million to 26 million annually It also risks creating the need for an additional facility with an estimated capital cost of 900 million and additional ongoing costs of about 60 million per year Reducing Support for Immigration Settlement Services In 2005 the federal and Ontario governments agreed to increase funds for immigration settlement services in the province However the federal government has underspent relative to its commitment under this Canada Ontario Immigration Agreement COIA by more than 220 million The success of immigrants could be impaired without adequate services to help newcomers settle integrate receive language training and find work The federal government informed Ontario in 2010 that funding for Ontario settlement agencies will be further reduced by 44 million in 2011 12 Long Term Health Costs Likely Outpacing Federal Funding The CHT along with the Wait Times Reduction Fund which is also set to expire in 2013 14 provides valuable resources to provincial health systems The federal government has committed to retaining the six per cent growth rate on the CHT until 2016 17 but its growth beginning in 2017 18 will be tied to a three year moving average of Canada s nominal GDP growth with a three per cent floor While we recommend capping the growth in Ontario health expenditures below that level to achieve a balanced budget by 2017 18 the long run cost of health care will almost certainly grow at a rate above nominal GDP The effects of Ontario s aging population on health costs will not ramp up considerably until after the six per cent growth rate is no longer in effect And as a luxury good purely in the microeconomic sense demand for health care services tends to increase faster than income One estimate implies that a four per cent rise in nominal GDP results in additional 6 4 per cent growth in health care costs 5 Moving to a GDP based growth rate is not an insignificant issue In 2017 18 the new growth rate based on GDP would cost Ontario almost 239 million based on current forecasts 6 but could reach almost 421 million if GDP growth falls to the three per cent floor These gaps will grow over time In 2023 24 Ontario s CHT share could be 2 3 billion to 3 8 billion lower than under the current formula By constraining CHT transfers to nominal GDP growth the federal government s minority share of health care funding in Ontario as in other provinces is likely to steadily decline even further in the long run This must be factored into Ontario s fiscal and health policy design Negotiations for the Canada European Union Free Trade Agreement CETA The outcome of the negotiations for a comprehensive free trade agreement with the European Union could have significant impact on the cost of prescription drugs in Ontario A key negotiating point the extension of Canadian patent protections for pharmaceutical drugs to European standards could cost Ontario taxpayers up to 1 2 billion annually 551 million for the Ontario government and 672 million for the private sector thus wiping out gains from recent drug reforms The province should work with the federal government to ensure that a CETA does not undermine Ontario s interest in expanding the use of generic drugs Aside from the major transfers 7 the federal government has made no commitment to renew any other expiring transfer These transfers support health labour market training and infrastructure in addition to other vital public services that could otherwise be at risk TABLE 20 2 Selected Examples of Transfers Set to Expire in 2013 14 Transfer 2011 12 Payment to Ontario Function Wait Times Reduction Fund 97 million Supports provinces for initiatives to reduce wait times Labour Market Agreement 0 2 billion Supports provincial training measures for unemployed workers not eligible for Employment Insurance benefits Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities 0 1 billion Provides funding for employment programs for persons with disabilities Building Canada Plan 0 2 billion Provides support for investments in infrastructure Source Ontario Ministry of Finance In the mid 1990s provinces and territories endured major cuts to federal transfers that put pressure on their fiscal plans and public services At a time when Ontario is moving to sustain and improve both the province needs a reliable and predictable federal partner Federal involvement in areas of provincial jurisdiction can undermine the ability of provinces to plan and deliver the services and programs for which they are responsible When the federal government moves in and out of social policy and programs it is disruptive to provincial plans and leaves provinces on the hook financially for picking up programs it abandons M Mendelsohn J Hjartarson and J Pearce Saving Dollars and Making Sense 2010 Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation Areas for Potential Reform Through its programs policies and transfers the federal government plays an important role in the provision of public services in Ontario Some federal programs that directly serve Ontarians or fiscal arrangements that support provincial services should be modernized and reformed Recommendation 20 2 Advocate strongly for reforming federal programs that are not working effectively in Ontario s interests Equalization The Equalization program constitutionally mandates the federal government to ensure that provinces have the ability to provide reasonably comparable levels of public services at reasonably comparable levels of taxation Provinces unable to raise revenues at the national average standard are provided with payments funded through federal taxation Over the past 10 years Ontarians have contributed almost 45 billion more to the Equalization program through their contribution to federal revenue than they have received back in Equalization payments Additionally Ontario s per capita GDP is slightly less than the national average 8 and at 7 7 per cent its unemployment rate is above the 7 5 per cent national rate 9 Yet as noted earlier in the chapter federal spending in and transfers to Ontario fall short of an equitable share of its revenues Further there is no requirement under the funding formula for provinces to include full resource revenues in the redistribution equation to Ontario s considerable detriment The Equalization program requires reform Ontario has yet to find its competitive positioning in the new global economy in part because it has been the largest net contributor to federal regional subsidies for over 50 years and has been unable to build a more globally competitive economy as a result Joe Cordiano and David MacKinnon New Regional Policies Are Urgently Needed Ottawa Citizen June 24 2011 Despite rising fiscal disparities among provinces the federal government introduced a ceiling on Equalization in 2009 that limited the size of the program to the growth rate of national GDP As a result the program equalizes less now than at any other time in the previous 20 years measured as a proportion of GDP Under this ceiling Equalization cannot fully capture and share the wealth generated from high commodity prices in other regions of Canada In addition the program does not account for differences in price levels across the country which affect the cost of public services Ontario faces higher cost pressures than other provinces see Chart 20 7 Even with its Equalization payment Ontario may not be able to deliver comparable levels of public services because of these additional cost pressures Similar to other equalization programs across the world Equalization should recognize and address these differences in prices Recommendation 20 3 Advocate for reforms to Equalization by at a minimum fully capturing resource revenues and accommodating differing price levels between provinces It is important to note that Ontario s actual per capita revenues are after equalization less than those of any traditional have not province It will cost more i e require more revenue for Ontario to provide one such bundle of public services than it will for any of the traditional recipients because wages and prices are higher here Tom Courchene Economy Ontario Have Not Province Sept 20 2011 Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation in many important ways residents of the have provinces of British Columbia Alberta and Ontario receive lower levels of government services than do taxpayers in the have not provinces whose government activities they subsidize Ben Eisen and Mark Milke Frontier Centre for Public Policy 2010 Canada Social Transfer Canada s fiscal arrangements have served to narrow fiscal inequities through cash transfers but experts have argued for more structural reform to allow provinces to raise more of their own revenues to fund their services There is a clear basis to this argument As noted the federal government generates revenues from Ontario at a rate very close to an equal per capita basis The CST then returns money to the province again on an equal per capita basis Unlike the CHT where provinces are technically required to adhere to the Canada Health Act there are no such provisions for the CST It is a block transfer with effectively no strings attached little more than a semantic shell game This unnecessary step is a source of inefficiency and reduces both accountability and transparency but it also presents an opportunity for reform Without a clear purpose the CST should be eliminated and transferred to provinces in the form of tax points The federal government should reduce its taxes so provinces could increase theirs by an equivalent revenue neutral amount A similar approach was undertaken in 1977 when the federal government transferred personal and corporate income tax points to the provinces It should be done again Recommendation 20 4 Simultaneously eliminate the Canada Social Transfer and transfer the equivalent tax points to the provinces Employment Insurance A growing number of organizations have criticized the federal Employment Insurance EI program for not meeting the needs of the modern labour market In 2010 Ontarians contributed about 40 per cent of EI premiums but received only 32 per cent of benefits Despite being one of the hardest hit provinces during the global economic recession and with the province s unemployment rate above the national average 10 Ontarians coverage remained near the lowest in the country with only 32 per cent of the unemployed receiving EI This inadequate coverage in EI benefits also restricts Ontarians eligibility for training measures associated with EI It is clear that the system needs reform The changes recommended by the Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation 11 including a single national entrance requirement as well as consistent formulas to calculate benefit durations and levels would improve outcomes for Ontario workers and employers See Chapter 8 Social Programs for the full recommendation Income Assistance for Persons with Disabilities Individuals with severe disabilities face significant barriers to participating in the labour force gaining employment and earning a decent wage see Chart 20 10 Those with severe disabilities are half as likely as those without disabilities to participate in the labour force Those who are active in the labour force are twice as likely to be unemployed and earn over 40 per cent less if they can find a job As described by the Caledon Institute people with severe disabilities have a tenuous relationship to the labour force 12 These vulnerable individuals are currently served by a tangled safety net that includes disability benefits from the Canada Pension Plan CPP disability benefit federal disability tax credit and provincial social assistance programs However assistance from CPP and disability tax credit is of little benefit to individuals who are detached from the labour market In addition provincial social assistance programs which already serve 22 per cent of those with severe disabilities are overburdened See Chapter 8 Social Programs for the full recommendation Immigration Policy Immigration will be an increasing source of growth for Ontario s working age population and economy As discussed in Chapter 10 Immigration the integration of these newcomers into society and the workforce requires effective settlement and integration services in addition to health social and education services Despite this the federal government underinvested in settlement services in Ontario from 2005 through 2011 compared to its commitment to the province and plans to further reduce its immigration settlement spending in Ontario in 2011 12 and beyond Moreover Ontario is allowed to nominate only 1 000 principal applicants through its Provincial Nominee Program compared to 5 000 for Alberta The province requires greater influence in determining the policy that governs immigration to meet Ontario s specific needs In addition the federal government should provide the province with the tools it needs to effectively integrate these newcomers by devolving immigration services with funding to Ontario The federal government should also look to jurisdictional best practices particularly in the area of foreign credential recognition where non recognition too often gets in the way of a newcomer s ability to participate in the labour force Australia s Pre Application Skills Assessment is promising and an equivalent program should be piloted in Canada See Chapter 10 Immigration for the full recommendation TABLE 20 3 Selected Examples of Federal Provincial Immigration Agreements Responsibility for immigrant selection and management of settlement services is devolved to the province Quebec 1991 Province is responsible for planning and delivering settlement services on behalf of the federal government compensation is provided Manitoba 1996 British Columbia 1998 Planning of settlement services is co managed by provincial and federal governments but federal government is responsible for delivery formal consultation mechanisms exist and partnerships with municipalities are identified as an objective Ontario 2005 Alberta 2007 Source Nick Bradford and Caroline Andrew The Harper Immigration Agenda Policy and Politics in Historical Context in How Ottawa Spends 2011 12 Christopher Stoney and G Bruce Doern eds 2011 Education for First Nations On Reserve There is an alarming gap in the educational attainment rate between on reserve First Nations and the non Aboriginal population Improving educational outcomes on reserves is crucial to improving the social and economic outcomes of First Nations peoples A serious investment in on reserve education has the potential to increase their economic inclusion and reduce the long run strain on public resources by reducing above average demand for government programs such as health care social services and the justice system It is commonly noted that federal funding for on reserve education falls short of the per student provincial average making it difficult to achieve the goal of provincial comparability The Commission believes there is an urgent need to significantly reform the provision of on reserve First Nations education The province should put strong pressure on the federal government to provide funding for First Nations on reserve education that at least reaches parity with per student provincial funding for elementary and secondary education Barring the action that is clearly justified and desperately needed the province should step up and fill this gap See Chapter 6 Elementary and Secondary Education for the full recommendation Green Energy The federal government has provided little support for Ontario s move towards green energy Yet it provides direct and indirect subsidies to Canada s oil and gas sectors worth 1 4 billion annually 13 in addition to 2 0 billion in total spending 14 for carbon capture and storage the Clean Energy Fund and the ecoEnergy Technology program all of which are primarily spent in two provinces Even where the federal government has promised support for clean energy most has been directed to fossil fuels and projects that do not build on Ontario s strengths Ontario needs fair and equitable support for its clean energy initiatives Recommendation 20 5 Advocate for federal greenhouse gas mitigation programs to provide fair and equitable support for Ontario s clean energy initiatives Working Together to Rationalize Public Services The purpose of this Commission is to provide recommendations to get Ontario back to balance by 2017 18 This includes making existing services more efficient Given the level of interdependency in the Canadian federation Ontario cannot seek these efficiencies alone Services overlap and are inefficiently allocated between the two orders of government Recommendation 20 6 Sort out areas of responsibility with the federal government where there is overlap and duplication and establish a more efficient economic and fiscal relationship that saves money and provides better services to citizens There are opportunities to reshape roles and responsibilities to capture efficiencies and improve effectiveness This discussion could start by examining The inefficiencies in overlapping employment and labour market training services The effectiveness of federal immigration settlement programs The gains from each government specializing in corrections services The collaboration in direct citizen transactional services The benefit of a national transit strategy and The rationalization of environmental protection activities and regulations Due to large budget deficits particularly at the provincial level there is considerable public concern over the sustainability of existing government services These pressures are not temporary An aging population means that public services will be under increasing strain making rationalization of program delivery necessary M Mendelsohn J Hjartarson and J Pearce Saving Dollars and Making Sense 2010 Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation Employment and Training Services Ontario is best positioned to deliver employment and training services that meet the changing needs of its labour market and fit coherently into its larger human capital agenda that incorporates other programs such as post secondary education Workforce development has a deep historic relationship to higher and post secondary education since many aspects of labour market training are delivered by community colleges part of the higher education sector Devolution has provided provincial governments with enhanced flexibility to tailor employment and training programs and services that are responsive to provincial and local labour market conditions and political directions Donna Wood and Thomas Klassen Bilateral Federalism and Workforce Development Policy in Canada Budget 2007 delivers on that commitment through a comprehensive new labour market training architecture that will provide labour market programming to those who need it by recognizing that provinces and territories are best placed to design and deliver this programming With the full implementation of this new architecture in combination with existing provincial and territorial labour market programming Canadians will have access to integrated labour market programming delivered by provinces and territories that can be tailored to their specific needs 2007 Federal Budget Recognizing that provinces are best positioned to deliver training programs the federal government devolved responsibility for training programs associated with EI to Ontario in 2007 This devolution funded through an allocation under the Employment Insurance Act requires that corresponding provincially delivered programs need to be similar to the original federal training programs and that clients must be eligible for EI The federal government continued to provide support to provincial training programs by creating a number of agreements each with its own client eligibility criteria program design and reporting and accounting requirements For example the Labour Market Development Agreement only supports services for EI eligible job seekers only 31 per cent of EI Part II funding flowing to Ontario In addition the Targeted Initiative for Older Workers supports services for only older workers For job seekers this fragmentation presents a confusing environment comprising multiple offices and locations exacerbating an already stressful time As discussed in Chapter 9 Employment and Training Services the fragmented nature of these agreements also limits the province s ability to maximize the benefits and savings that fully integrated services and streamlined reporting requirements would provide and results in fragmented and distorted policy making TABLE 20 4 Labour Market Transfers Agreements Eligibility Labour Market Development Agreement Primarily targeted to Employment Insurance EI clients Labour Market Agreement Unemployed individuals who are not EI eligible such as social assistance recipients immigrants and other key groups Employed individuals who are low skilled no high school diploma or recognized certification Targeted Initiative for Older Workers Laid off workers aged 50 and over primarily targeted to those aged 55 to 64 Must be in communities of less than 250 000 people that have high unemployment or a high reliance on single industries Labour Market Agreement for Persons with Disabilities Employment related programming for persons with disabilities Source Ontario Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities The devolution is not complete In its 2007 budget the federal government committed to exploring the transfer of around 500 million annually to allow provinces to deliver the remaining federal training programs These programs include services for youth and persons with disabilities which overlap with existing provincial programming Despite this commitment the federal government has not yet consulted the provinces on further devolution Ontario s services for youth and persons with disabilities are effective Client surveys indicate that both participants and employers are satisfied with programs The transfer of responsibility for the training of these groups would allow the province to integrate remaining federal programs into the existing suite of effective provincial services This would improve the quality of programming and outcomes for job seekers while achieving efficiencies through administrative savings TABLE 20 5 Outcomes from Select Summer Jobs Services Year Number of Placements Client Satisfaction Participant Employer 2009 10 48 108 96 99 2010 11 59 161 96 99 Source Ontario Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities Several labour market agreements expire after 2013 14 presenting an opportunity for reform The current patchwork of labour market agreements for persons with disabilities older workers EI or non EI recipients should be replaced with a flexible per capita transfer that is wholly funded outside of the EI program with streamlined reporting requirements and that includes the further devolution of residual training programs for youth and persons with disabilities Greater flexibility for Ontario would allow the province to continue adapting the full suite of labour market programs to keep pace with the changing needs of its labour force See Chapter 9 Employment and Training Services for the full recommendation Immigration Settlement and Integration Services Given the importance of immigration to the growth of Ontario s labour force and economy it is crucial that newcomers are effectively integrated into the community and the labour force so they can fully realize their potential Both the federal and Ontario governments provide immigration settlement services Although both governments share the same values and desired outcomes significant overlap in services and administration exists which creates inefficiencies and reduces co ordination The Manitoba and BC experiences provide evidence that devolution can provide the space for innovation and adaptation to changing circumstances and the needs and views of the settlement sector F Leslie Seidle The Canada Ontario Immigration Agreement Even countries with traditions of highly centralized government such as the United Kingdom are now experimenting with new devolutionary decentralized arrangements Myer Siemiatycki and Phil Triadfilopoulos International Perspectives on Immigrant Service Provision Experts agree that responsibility for integrating newcomers should lie with regional or local authorities which can design programs that best meet regional needs Ontario could also integrate federal settlement services into its existing suite of settlement programs see Table 20 6 in addition to programs for education training and social services Settlement programs have been devolved to provincial governments in British Columbia Manitoba and Quebec but the federal government has not agreed to do the same for Ontario TABLE 20 6 Examples of Provincial Programs to Settle and Integrate Newcomers Program Achievements Bridge Training Over 100 different highly skilled in demand occupations have been targeted with Ontario Bridge Training Programs Approximately 70 per cent of participants who complete bridge training programs targeting licensure obtained licensure in their profession within a year of completing the program On average 65 per cent of participants who completed bridge training programs obtained employment in their field within a year of completing the program Language Training 94 per cent of learners surveyed responded that their class would be either helpful 33 per cent or very helpful 61 per cent in reaching their goals Newcomer Settlement Program 97 per cent of service users report a high overall level of satisfaction with the services they received and find the services useful and relevant 78 per cent say that they can make more informed decisions about their new life in Ontario after receiving services 75 per cent indicate that they are more knowledgeable about services and how to access them Global Experience Ontario Over 90 per cent of clients who met with GEO advisors indicated that they were satisfied with the overall quality of services they received Source Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration With the expiration of the COIA anticipated reductions in federal immigration settlement spending and the growing importance of immigration to Ontario s economy the federal government should provide the province with the tools it needs to effectively integrate newcomers by devolving settlement services to Ontario with funding Devolution would produce savings through rationalization and generate better outcomes for newcomers See Chapter 10 Immigration for the full recommendation Corrections Services Effective rehabilitation services help keep communities safe and control correctional expenses But the current arrangement for allocating responsibilities for inmates prevents Canada s correctional sector from maximizing the benefits of these services Offenders sentenced to two years or less serve their terms in provincial prisons while the remainder serve in federal penitentiaries Effective rehabilitation services can be provided for inmates serving longer than six months However provincial inmates serving sentences longer than six months and under two years do not constitute a critical mass for provinces to provide rehabilitation services at scale Furthermore recent federal changes to the Criminal Code put fiscal pressures on provincial court and correctional services The Commission recommends that the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services explore the possibility of uploading responsibility for inmates serving six months and longer to the federal government which would better align fiscal incentives for corrections and would give these inmates access to federal rehabilitation services In addition the uploading of these responsibilities would allow governments to specialize and enhance their services to reduce recidivism which could reduce long run costs while making communities safer See Chapter 14 Justice Sector for the full recommendation Citizen Transactional Services The Ontario government has transformed the way front line public services are delivered with the creation of ServiceOntario which integrates the services delivered by various ministries into one easy to access location ServiceOntario has reduced wait times improved accessibility and achieved efficiencies The province has worked with the federal government to deliver integrated services such as the Newborn Registration Service BizPaL and a single 1 888 number for business in addition to co locating four shared offices The federal provincial and municipal governments should continue to explore other opportunities to work together and deliver integrated seamless and timely solutions for citizens See Chapter 16 Operating and Back Office Expenditures for the full recommendation National Transit Strategy Despite Canada s enormous geographical size it is one of the world s most urbanized countries Eighty per cent of Canadians live in urban centres Unsurprisingly traffic congestion is not limited to the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area or Ontario It is a systemic issue from coast to coast justifying a national approach Indeed the federal government is affected by gridlock as much as any province through lost productivity and tax revenue in 2006 Transport Canada noted that congestion poses a national challenge in terms of the costs it imposes in lost time increased fuel consumption and increased greenhouse gas emissions 15 And the Canadian Chamber of Commerce has noted that despite Canada s urban nature it is the sole member nation of the Organization for Economic Co operation and Development that lacks a national transit strategy 16 See Chapter 12 Infrastructure Real Estate and Electricity for the full recommendation Environmental Protection and Regulation Environmental management is a responsibility shared by both orders of government Some major projects are subject to the assessment and regulation of both jurisdictions which creates complexity and uncertainty for proponents To reduce duplication and streamline environmental assessment Ontario signed the Canada Ontario Agreement on Environmental Assessment Co operation in 2004 which commits both governments to conduct a co operative assessment while retaining their respective decision making powers However more remains to be done to streamline environmental assessments and harmonize regulations As discussed in Chapter 15 Labour Relations and Compensation the federal government is currently reviewing its legislation governing federal environmental assessments the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act and has expressed interest in the removal of duplication between approvals processes The Commission recommends that the federal and provincial governments continue to press ahead in their efforts to create a one project one environmental assessment approach that continues to maintain high environmental standards See Chapter 13 Environment and Natural Resources for the full recommendation Summary Canadians are served by two orders of sovereign governments that while independent should work collaboratively to serve their citizens But collaboration and working together do not necessarily mean delivering the same services Rather collaboration means having a dialogue on rationalizing and disentangling services or where necessary working together towards common objectives Nineteenth century institutional arrangements groan under the weight of 21st century pressures M Mendelsohn J Hjartarson and J Pearce Saving Dollars and Making Sense 2010 Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation Having a strong federal partner means a federal government that is willing to discuss transformative changes to how the federation works The arrangements within and structure of the federation must keep pace with a rapidly changing world Provincial Municipal Relations The provincial municipal relationship in Ontario is complex and intertwined There are 444 municipalities in Ontario ranging in population from over 2 5 million in the City of Toronto to fewer than five permanent residents in the Township of Cockburn Island Municipalities have shared responsibility for many important areas of public policy and provide many of their services based on provincial legislation requirements and standards Examples of municipal service delivery include social housing social assistance drinking water quality public transportation land use planning and waste management Significant strides have been made in recent years to stabilize and strengthen the provincial municipal relationship However as we highlight in the federal provincial section intergovernmental arrangements must keep pace with a rapidly changing world While it is important that the province and municipalities continue to have dialogue on improving co ordination of services as discussed previously a sharper delineation of responsibilities between governments may be more prudent For municipal service delivery the Commission has noted that quite often all three levels of government are involved in delivering programs and services and in some cases a fourth layer is added through the involvement of non profit or community service organizations This causes service delivery confusion duplication of efforts and additional bureaucracy A thorough review of funding and service delivery relationships and responsibilities may prove to be useful in providing clarity Provincial support to municipalities has increased significantly in recent years and it is important that both levels of government work together to ensure that these provincial investments result in tangible outcomes for Ontarians The Fiscal Relationship Municipalities raise most of their annual revenues from their own sources these include property taxation user fees and licences and other revenues such as investment income development charges donations and so on These sources accounted for 78 per cent of municipal annual revenues in 2009 see Chart 20 11 Yet provincial transfers remain an important source of funding for municipalities nearly one fifth of their annual revenues see Chart 20 11 These transfers include the provincial share of funding for cost shared programs as well as unconditional funding provided through the Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund OMPF Recent Historical Provincial Support to Ontario s Municipalities From 2003 to 2010 the Ontario government increased financial support to municipalities by almost 1 6 billion or 150 per cent through the upload of social assistance benefit program costs as well as other uploads in the areas of public health land ambulance and the provincial gas tax This significant increase in support to municipalities was intended to address municipal concerns regarding previous efforts to realign service and funding responsibilities particularly through the Local Services Realignment LSR initiative in 1998 Through the LSR exercise the provincial government transferred the full or partial cost of a number of services to municipalities including social housing Ontario Drug Benefit ODB program Ontario Disability Support Program ODSP and child care To help municipalities fund this realignment of services the province transferred 2 5 billion in residential education tax revenue to municipalities 17 The province also created an unconditional grant the Community Reinvestment Fund CRF to ensure that the transfer of services was revenue neutral Municipalities argued that LSR was not revenue neutral and that it imposed additional costs on the property tax base which prevented needed investments in local priorities such as infrastructure Municipalities maintained that the burden of paying for social assistance benefits in particular constrained their ability to invest in important priorities The OMPF replaced the CRF in 2005 and is the province s main transfer to municipalities It is designed to target support to municipalities with high social program and policing costs as well as address challenges faced by northern and rural communities The program responds to the individual circumstances of each municipality In 2012 the province will provide 583 million in OMPF grants to 373 municipalities 18 A landmark agreement for the provincial municipal relationship was the Provincial Municipal Fiscal and Service Delivery Review PMFSDR in 2008 The PMFSDR was a joint initiative involving the province Association of Municipalities of Ontario AMO and City of Toronto This agreement committed the province to upload from the property tax base municipal costs related to the ODB ODSP Ontario Works and court security and prisoner transportation costs between 2008 and 2018 without any corresponding commitment from the municipal sector In 2012 the estimated benefit of the provincial uploads to municipalities combined with 583 million in OMPF funding totals 1 8 billion In addition to this ongoing support the province is increasingly involved in funding municipal infrastructure having provided municipalities with over 12 billion for infrastructure since 2003 Provincial Municipal Issues Addressed in Report Provincial municipal issues and recommendations are found throughout the report s chapters Below we provide a comprehensive recommendation list Please refer to the respective chapters for broader discussion of the recommendations Social Programs Chapter 8 Recommendation 8 5 The Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario should examine system design options that deliver a more efficient and higher quality service to social assistance recipients This examination should consider combining Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program and having the combined program delivered at the local level It should also address the further integration of employment services available through Employment Ontario Infrastructure Real Estate and Electricity Chapter 12 Recommendation 12 1 Place more emphasis on achieving greater value from existing assets in asset management plan reporting requirements than is currently proposed in the Long Term Infrastructure Plan for certain organizations e g universities municipalities etc Recommendation 12 2 Implement full cost pricing for water and wastewater services Recommendation 12 5 Pursue a

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  • Appendix 1: Commission Recommendations
    nurses dietitians and midwives for example Unlisted practitioners such as physiotherapists and massage therapists would also be part of FHTs however their services would be provided on a cost recovery basis Recommendation 5 63 Require Family Health Teams FHTs to accept patients who choose them and the FHTs should work with each patient to connect them with the most appropriate constellation of care providers Recommendation 5 64 The regional health authority should establish incentives to discourage Family Health Teams from referring patients to acute care Recommendation 5 65 Regional authorities should also be responsible for assigning heavy users of the health care system to the appropriate Family Health Team FHT If for example there are 300 heavy users within a region and three FHTs the regional health authority would try to steer 100 to each so that no FHT is overburdened Recommendation 5 66 Because Family Health Teams FHTs will be responsible for patient tracking they will need to build a critical mass of an administrative arm to carry out this task This administrative arm should be shared among a number of FHTs Recommendation 5 67 Better after hours care must be offered and telephone Internet services should direct patients to the most appropriate and convenient care provider Recommendation 5 68 All Family Health Teams must be encouraged to add more specialists to their teams which will reduce referrals and ease some of the complexities of patient tracking Recommendation 5 69 The Ministry of Health and Long Term Care should allow the flexibility necessary for Family Health Teams to share specialists by permitting part time contracts Recommendation 5 70 All Family Health Team physicians must begin engaging in discussions with their middle aged patients about end of life health care Recommendation 5 71 Improve access to care e g in remote communities and productivity for specialists by triaging appropriate patients for telemedicine services e g teledermatology teleophthalmology Recommendation 5 72 Remove perverse incentives that undermine the quality and efficiency of care For example physicians are penalized when one of their patients goes to another walk in clinic but not when the patient goes to the emergency department of a hospital More generally the fee for service compensation model gives an incentive for medical interventions without due consideration to quality and efficiency of care Such incentive issues must be addressed by focusing the Ontario Medical Association s negotiations more on quality of care and amending payment systems for physicians and throughout the health care system Recommendation 5 73 The model described in the above recommendations must be supported by a robust data collection and sharing system that allows the creation of the necessary records For example the model works only if we know how many patients are not visiting emergency departments or how many diabetes patients are not experiencing complications see Recommendations 5 17 and 5 50 on Health Based Allocation Model data for more details Recommendation 5 74 Increase the focus on home care supported by required resources particularly at the community level Recommendation 5 75 Match seniors to the services that they need from the earliest available care provider reduce alternate level of care days and improve co ordination of care through the use of referral management tools for long term care home care and community services Recommendation 5 76 Implement the recommendations contained in Caring for Our Aging Population and Addressing Alternate Level of Care a report prepared by Dr David Walker and released in August 2011 Recommendation 5 77 In addition to recommendations contained in Caring for Our Aging Population and Addressing Alternate Level of Care a report prepared by Dr David Walker and released in August 2011 there is a need for more and varied palliative care at home and in residential hospices Recommendation 5 78 Integrate the public health system into the other parts of the health system i e Local Health Integration Networks Recommendation 5 79 Review the current funding model that requires a 25 per cent match from municipalities for public health spending Recommendation 5 80 Consider fully uploading public health to the provincial level to ensure better integration with the health care system and avoid existing funding pressures Recommendation 5 81 Improve co ordination across the public health system not only among public health units but also among hospitals community care providers and primary care physicians Recommendation 5 82 Replicate British Columbia s Act Now initiative which has been identified by the World Health Organization as a best practice for health promotion and chronic disease prevention in Ontario Recommendation 5 83 Have doctors address diet and exercise issues before reaching for the prescription pad when dealing with health issues such as cardiovascular disease and late onset Type 2 diabetes Recommendation 5 84 Do more to promote population health and healthy lifestyles and to reverse the trend of childhood obesity especially through schools Recommendation 5 85 Work with the federal government on nutrition information and where appropriate regulation Recommendation 5 86 Medical schools should educate students on system issues so they better understand how physicians fit into the health care system for example how to deal with patient needs efficiently and effectively but using fewer resources by connecting different parts of the health care system Recommendation 5 87 Do a better job of flagging health professions and locations that are currently in short supply or where shortages can be expected in the future Recommendation 5 88 Link the Ontario Drug Benefit program more directly to income Recommendation 5 89 Help reduce medication errors through the use of electronic supports to cross reference multiple prescriptions Recommendation 5 90 Reduce fraudulent prescription medication use through the use of drug information systems Recommendation 5 91 Pursue with other provinces the possibility of establishing a national entity that would set a common price for pharmaceuticals for the entire country or at least jurisdictions opting in Recommendation 5 92 Conduct drug to drug comparisons to determine which drug is the most efficient at addressing a given ailment Recommendation 5 93 Work with the federal government to ensure that Ontario s interests in expanding use of generic drugs are not undermined by a Canada European Union Free Trade Agreement Recommendation 5 94 Use pharmacists to their full scope of practice Recommendation 5 95 Centralize all back office functions such as information technology human resources finance and procurement across the health system Recommendation 5 96 Establish a central mechanism to oversee the creation of a spot market for goods and discretionary services such as diagnostics infusions and specialist consultation services Recommendation 5 97 Put a wider array of specialist services to tender based on price and quality while remaining under the single payer model Recommendation 5 98 Put to tender more service delivery but with the criteria for selection based on quality adjusted metrics rather than just price Recommendation 5 99 Accelerate the adoption of electronic records working in a bottom up fashion Recommendation 5 100 Adopt the Nova Scotia model in which emergency medical technicians provide home care when not on emergency calls this requires integrating municipal and provincial funding structures Recommendation 5 101 Provide better information to individuals and families to facilitate self care for people with conditions such as diabetes Recommendation 5 102 Begin a dialogue with Ontarians on the issue of expanding the coverage of the health system to include for example pharmaceuticals long term care and aspects of mental health care Recommendation 5 103 Involve all stakeholders in a mature conversation on the future of health care and the 20 year plan Recommendation 5 104 Establish a Commission to guide the health reforms Recommendation 5 105 Do not let concerns about successor rights stop amalgamations that make sense and are critical to successful reform Chapter 6 Elementary and Secondary Education Recommendation 6 1 To meet our overall fiscal objectives the Commission believes that the growth rate in the education budget over the term from 2010 11 to 2017 18 must be constrained to one per cent per year Recommendation 6 2 The budget constraint must be applied strategically so as not to jeopardize the improvements in results achieved such as on provincial assessments and with graduation rates Recommendation 6 3 The elementary and secondary education sector should stay the course with its current agenda which consists of three key goals improving student achievement closing gaps in student outcomes and increasing confidence in the publicly funded school system The province and the sector must sustain the current alignment between provincial school board and school level efforts and sustain the pressure and support approach adopted in recent years Recommendation 6 4 Reforms in the elementary and secondary sector should be introduced so that all stakeholders have their role to play in ensuring the system s long term sustainability and so that unnecessary sources of distraction are avoided Recommendation 6 5 To ensure transparency and effectiveness the province should confirm multi year allocations to school boards for the 2012 13 to 2017 18 period so that they can plan accordingly have enough time to find the required efficiencies and enter negotiations for renewal of the sector s collective agreements that will expire on Aug 31 2012 with clear knowledge of their budgetary position Recommendation 6 6 The Ontario government should put strong pressure on the federal government to provide funding for First Nations on reserve education that at least reaches parity with per student provincial funding for elementary and secondary education Recommendation 6 7 The province should negotiate with the federal government and First Nations to ensure the establishment of new multi year strategic top up funding agreements for on reserve schools These agreements voluntary for interested First Nations would ensure that per student funding for on reserve schools is at least equivalent to that provided to adjacent English language public district school boards Recommendation 6 8 Agreements with the federal government should facilitate the formation of education entities among participating First Nations with powers similar to provincially funded district school boards To establish a system of support services for on reserve schools chief executive officers of the new education entities should join the Council of Ontario Directors of Education as well as the regional education councils Additionally the new education entities should negotiate with the province multi year targets for the proportion of supervisory officers principals and teachers who will be deemed qualified by the Ontario College of Teachers Such qualifications can be earned from existing providers or from newly accredited Aboriginal service providers Recommendation 6 9 When negotiating funding agreements the province should pressure the federal government to increase funding for capital for on reserve schools and consider transferring this funding to the province which is better equipped to provide expertise for K 12 capital renewal and construction Recommendation 6 10 Failing to come to an agreement with the federal government the Commission recommends that the province step up to provide funding to ensure that on reserve schools are funded at parity with adjacent English language public district school boards Recommendation 6 11 Given the difficulties with such an approach and the prohibitive cost of the program overall at this time the Commission recommends cancellation of the full day kindergarten FDK program without prejudice to schools that already had FDK before the introduction of this government strategy Recommendation 6 12 If the government decides to continue the implementation of the full day kindergarten program then the Commission recommends delaying full implementation from 2014 15 to 2017 18 and reducing program costs by adopting a more affordable staffing model involving one teacher for about 20 students rather than a teacher and an early childhood educator for 26 students to help moderate salary expenditures for the program by about 200 million The government should not confirm full implementation of the program without assurances from school boards teacher federations and support staff unions that negotiated annual wage increases by 2017 18 will not be higher than the current trends in the broader public sector and that the class size increases and reductions in non teaching staff contemplated by the Commission by 2017 18 will be achieved Recommendation 6 13 Set the cap in class size for primary grades at 23 and eliminate the other requirement that 90 per cent of classes must be at 20 or fewer and increase the averages in junior intermediate class sizes from 24 5 to 26 and secondary class sizes from 22 to 24 Recommendation 6 14 The province should cap the funding of high school credits to 32 successful credits per student and amend the Education Act to give the power to school boards to charge a modest fee set by the province for each additional credit above the 32 successfully completed credit threshold Recommendation 6 15 The province should immediately lift the moratorium on the competitive procurement requirement for student transportation so that competitive bids are used for the 2012 13 school year Recommendation 6 16 The province should amend the Education Act to give school boards the power to charge a modest transportation user fee set by the province Recommendation 6 17 Education stakeholders should build on the climate of trust and evidence based decision making fostered since 2003 to begin a constructive dialogue on how best to find the savings needed to meet student achievement objectives while holding annual spending growth to one per cent To help stakeholders the Commission believes the following measures should be phased in progressively over the next six years in this priority sequence Reduce by 25 per cent the per pupil funding for textbooks and learning materials classroom supplies and computers Increase the average class size from 22 to 24 in Grades 9 to 12 Set the cap in class size at 23 in primary grades and eliminate the other requirement that 90 per cent of classes must be at 20 or fewer Increase the average class size from 24 5 to 26 in Grades 4 to 8 by 2017 18 Eliminate 70 per cent of the 13 800 additional non teaching positions created in school boards since 2002 03 and Reduce by 25 per cent the funding for capital renewal and student transportation Recommendation 6 18 The province should review its special education programs and the results they have achieved including both section programs for students in care custody or treatment and hospital boards with the aim of ensuring that funding is being used effectively to improve student outcomes Recommendation 6 19 The government should close the Demonstration Schools and reinvest savings to expand alternative secondary school programs in school boards The three Schools for the Deaf in Belleville London and Milton should be consolidated into one site to achieve a greater critical mass of students from primary grades through secondary school Savings should be reinvested in the consolidated school for the deaf and in enhanced opportunities for deaf learners in school boards colleges and universities The Ministry of Education should transfer the oversight and management of the Brantford site and of the newly consolidated school for the deaf to one or two English language school boards and transfer the oversight and management of the Centre Jules Léger School for the Deaf to a French language school board Recommendation 6 20 The added value of training programs leading to additional qualification should be reviewed and decisions regarding the granting of qualifications and experience should be made by a body that is independent of teacher federations and school boards Recommendation 6 21 The province should be able to exercise legislative and regulatory authority to require that teachers have a minimum number of years of full time teaching experience before they are allowed to attempt an additional qualification While they could decide to make contractual arrangements with faculties of education or other service providers school boards should ultimately have direct oversight of the content of additional qualification courses The design of such courses should be reviewed in tandem with the new curriculum for the two year teacher education program in Ontario Both should be more rigorous and evidence based and focused on those aspects of their work that lead to improved student outcomes Recommendation 6 22 In the upcoming renewal of collective agreements school boards should negotiate the removal of entitlements associated with retirement gratuities to help offset the costs of future economic adjustments School boards power in the Education Act to offer retirement gratuities should be removed Recommendation 6 23 The government should work with school boards teacher federations and support staff unions to investigate mechanisms involving shared ownership and administration of benefit programs in the education sector Recommendation 6 24 The government should amend the Education Act to give power to the minister to order the sale of closed schools or other unused properties especially when such dispositions could meet other needs in the broader public sector Recommendation 6 25 The province should no longer provide top up funding to underutilized secondary schools if these schools could instead accommodate some or all of the Grade 7 and 8 students in their catchment area Recommendation 6 26 To mitigate further increases the province should in future discussions with the Ontario Teachers Federation reject further employer rate increases to the Teachers Pension Plan beyond the current rate and instead examine which benefits could be reduced prospectively to make the Plan more affordable and benchmark any changes to the provisions contained in other plans Recommendation 6 27 The government should work in a co ordinated fashion to discuss supply planning and in particular the overproduction of teachers with Ontario s 13 universities offering teacher education programs Attempts should be made to direct teacher education spaces to areas of greater need especially in light of the staffing changes contemplated by the Commission between now and 2017 18 Chapter 7 Post Secondary Education Recommendation 7 1 Grow government funding for the post secondary education sector by 1 5 per cent per year until 2017 18 Recommendation 7 2 Work with post secondary institutions to reduce bargained compensation increases where they exist and instead align them with trends in more recent settlements in the broader public sector a rigorous performance system should also be introduced to guide compensation where one is not already in place Recommendation 7 3 If capital budgets are constrained post secondary institutions should consider using alternative financing and procurement especially for buildings that do not qualify for government funding such as residences Recommendation 7 4 By 2012 13 establish multi year mandate agreements with universities and colleges that provide more differentiation and minimize duplication these should be implemented beginning in 2013 14 Recommendation 7 5 Institute a process for establishing mandate agreements using a review by either a blue ribbon panel or the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario to ensure the highest quality programs are funded to grow and expand This should be completed in the 2012 13 fiscal year and must be transparent for the institutions and the public Recommendation 7 6 Establish and implement a rational and strategic division of roles between the college and university systems Recommendation 7 7 Create a comprehensive enforceable credit recognition system between and among universities and colleges This is an absolutely essential feature of differentiation Recommendation 7 8 Post secondary institutions need to devote more resources to experiential learning such as internships allow for more independent or self assigned study develop problem based learning modules and increase study abroad and international experiences Many institutions already incorporate these features into their programs funding them from within existing portfolios Recommendation 7 9 Encourage universities that do not presently have flexible provisions regarding teaching and research workloads in their collective agreements with faculty to consider such provisions in future bargaining While each university must conduct teaching and research top performing teachers and researchers should be recognized with the appropriate workloads and rewards Recommendation 7 10 Have post secondary institutions redesign incentive systems to reward excellent teachers as is currently done for researchers Recommendation 7 11 Link further provincial funding allocations to quality objectives which will encourage post secondary institutions to be more responsive In addition the province should alter the funding model to also reward degrees awarded rather than just enrolment levels Recommendation 7 12 Government and post secondary institutions must measure learning outcomes that is the value added through education not just whether a person graduates Recommendation 7 13 Enhance performance measures in multi year accountability agreements with post secondary institutions through the use of teacher performance scores and student satisfaction ratings where the primary reasons for dissatisfaction are adequately captured Recommendation 7 14 Work with private career colleges to collect and publish the same performance indicators as public colleges and universities Private career colleges should bear the cost of such reporting Recommendation 7 15 As a part of the mandate agreements with post secondary institutions tie outcome quality indicators to funding Recommendation 7 16 Evaluate the research funding system of post secondary institutions and research hospitals as a whole including how it is affecting university and hospital budgeting practices Recommendation 7 17 Award provincial research funding more strategically and manage it more efficiently Consolidating and offering a single window approach for access and reporting through an online portal will greatly improve efficiency and reduce paperwork both for government and for post secondary institutions Recommendation 7 18 Maintain the existing tuition framework which allows annual tuition increases of five per cent However simplify the design to maintain the overall ceiling but allow institutions greater flexibility to adjust tuition fees at the program level within the ceiling Recommendation 7 19 Maintain the Ontario Student Access Guarantee which represents 10 per cent of additional tuition revenue that institutions are required to set aside to fund bursaries and other student assistance programs Recommendation 7 20 Reshape student financial assistance provided by both the federal and provincial governments including the newly announced 30 Off Ontario Tuition grant to target more of the assistance to low income students whose access is most likely to be compromised by financial obstacles and broaden the approach to improving access to post secondary education Recommendation 7 21 Explore phasing out provincial tuition and education tax credits to invest in upfront grants Recommendation 7 22 Streamline student financial assistance by decoupling loans and grants Eligibility for grants should not be contingent on loan applications Recommendation 7 23 Harmonize the variety of scholarships grants and other assistance programs that the government offers into already existing programs of a similar nature across post secondary institutions Recommendation 7 24 Lower the current 25 per cent Ontario Student Assistance Program default rate threshold for triggering cost sharing to 20 per cent for all post secondary institutions in Ontario and work with institutions towards the objective of setting a still lower threshold in future Recommendation 7 25 Extend the review period for Ontario Student Assistance Program default rates which are now measured roughly two years after borrowers start repaying Recommendation 7 26 Have the post secondary sector leverage its existing collective purchasing capacity through the Ontario Education Collaborative Marketplace and regional buying groups Recommendation 7 27 Establish a single pension fund administrator for all university and college pensions while recognizing differences in pensions Recommendation 7 28 Before new capital spaces are approved require universities and colleges to demonstrate increased use of space and consider year round optimization of existing spaces Priority should be given to the deferred maintenance in the current capital stock before new capital projects Recommendation 7 29 Compel post secondary institutions to examine whether they can compress some four year degrees into three years by continuing throughout the summer Recommendation 7 30 Cease funding for international marketing of Ontario s universities and integrate it into existing trade mission activities Universities colleges and the federal government already invest in these activities Chapter 8 Social Programs Recommendation 8 1 Hold growth in social programs spending to 0 5 per cent per year Recommendation 8 2 Move aggressively towards a fully integrated benefits system that simplifies client access improves client outcomes and improves fiscal sustainability through greater program effectiveness and reduced administrative costs Recommendation 8 3 A fully integrated benefits system should seek efficiencies by at a minimum centralizing income testing and payment delivery automating the processing of applications eligibility and payments automating income verification consolidating program delivery and standardizing eligibility criteria Recommendation 8 4 Collect the information necessary to deliver and evaluate a fully integrated benefits system In doing so continue to respect and protect personal information and privacy Recommendation 8 5 The Commission for the Review of Social Assistance in Ontario should examine system design options that deliver a more efficient and higher quality service to social assistance recipients This examination should consider combining Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program and having the combined program delivered at the local level It should also address the further integration of employment services available through Employment Ontario Recommendation 8 6 Undertake a thorough initial assessment of new entrants into social assistance to identify the degree of intervention required to help them return to the labour market Triage new entrants to appropriate supports according to this assessment Recommendation 8 7 Streamline and integrate other employment and training services with Employment Ontario including the bulk of the employment and training service component of social assistance in a carefully sequenced manner Recommendation 8 8 Prepare and support people with disabilities who are entering the workplace Work with employers and fellow employees to properly understand and accommodate the specific needs of the individual in the workplace Recommendation 8 9 Advocate for federal reforms in two key areas Work with other provinces and the federal government to establish a national income support program for people with disabilities who are unlikely to re enter the workforce Implement the final recommendations of the Mowat Centre Employment Insurance Task Force Recommendation 8 10 If growth in expenditures for social programs is contained below the 0 5 per cent annual growth rate reinvest savings into social assistance with priority given to Increasing asset limits for social assistance qualification Tying specific benefits beginning with the Ontario Drug Benefit program to income levels rather than to social assistance status to help tear down the welfare wall and If funds remain raising basic needs and shelter amounts Recommendation 8 11 Continue implementing reforms to child welfare proposed by the Commission to Promote Sustainable Child Welfare This must include building on reforms to Children s Aid Societies implementing an outcome based accountability structure and strengthening links between the child welfare sector and services in other sectors such as education post secondary education and employment and training services Recommendation 8 12 In light of the Commission s recommendation to reinvest savings achieved by holding the increase of social program spending below the recommended 0 5 per cent annual growth rate into specific social assistance reforms the government should retain the current maximum level of the Ontario Child Benefit Recommendation 8 13 Reconfigure child and youth mental health services to consolidate agencies and improve service delivery and integration both within the sector itself and with other sectors such as children s services health education and youth justice Recommendation 8 14 Integrate children s services to enhance early identification and intervention Recommendation 8 15 Move towards consolidating developmental services funding for community based support programs into a single direct funding program Recommendation 8 16 Reduce excess capacity in the youth justice system through strategic closures of facilities Recommendation 8 17 Reform funding practices in the non profit sector to increase flexibility and reduce administrative costs by focusing on measuring outcomes rather than inputs Recommendation 8 18 Provide a single point of access within government for the non profit sector to improve and broaden relationships across ministries that enter into contracts with the non profit sector using a model such as the Open for Business initiative Recommendation 8 19 Undertake pilot projects using social impact bonds across a range of applications Chapter 9 Employment and Training Services Recommendation 9 1 Focus the efforts of Employment Ontario on clients who need complex interventions Streamline clients requiring modest intervention to low cost self serve resources as efficiently as possible Recommendation 9 2 Streamline and integrate other employment and training services with Employment Ontario including the bulk of the employment and training service component of social assistance and integration and settlement services for newcomers in a carefully sequenced manner Recommendation 9 3 Advocate for a comprehensive training agreement to replace the patchwork of federal provincial employment and training funding agreements currently in place many of which are about to expire with a single arrangement Recommendation 9 4 Tie employment and training programs more explicitly to measured outcomes Data collection must in turn be improved Recommendation 9 5 Advocate for the collection of sub provincial data in all future federal surveys on labour vacancies Leverage labour vacancy data to inform employment and training program design and delivery Recommendation 9 6 Transfer responsibility for Workforce Planning Boards to the Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities regional offices to develop stronger local linkages and broaden community and regional planning for economic development Recommendation 9 7 Direct Workforce Planning Boards to encourage employers to increase investments in workplace based training Recommendation 9 8 Develop a labour market policy framework to link planning for employment and training services more strongly to economic development initiatives led by ministries such as Economic Development and Innovation Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs and Northern Development and Mines Recommendation 9 9 Shift the responsibility for all apprenticeship administration to other actors in the sector Functions related to the administration of apprenticeship classroom training should be given to colleges and union training centres All other administrative responsibilities for apprenticeships should be transferred to the College of Trades over time Chapter 10 Immigration Recommendation 10 1 Develop a position on immigration policies that is in the province s best economic and social interests Present this position to the federal government with the expectation that as the largest recipient of immigrants in Canada Ontario s interest will be given considerable weight in federal policy development Recommendation 10 2 Catalyze national discussions on immigration policy as the successful integration of immigrants is critical for Canada s and Ontario s economic futures Recommendation 10 3 Advocate the federal government for a greater provincial role in immigrant selection to ensure that the level and mix of immigrants coming to Ontario is optimized to support economic prosperity and improve outcomes for immigrants Barring success advocate for an expanded Provincial Nominee Program Recommendation 10 4 Press the federal government to be more transparent in its refugee policies and practices and to compensate Ontario for the costs of providing additional social supports to refugees and refugee claimants Recommendation 10 5 Advocate for the federal government to undertake a pilot program equivalent to Australia s pre application skills assessment Recommendation 10 6 Streamline and integrate provincially delivered integration and settlement services for recent immigrants with Employment Ontario Recommendation 10 7 Advocate for devolving federal immigrant settlement and training programs to the province with an appropriate funding mechanism similar to those established in British Columbia and Manitoba Chapter 11 Business Support Recommendation 11 1 Government needs to publish an economic vision for Ontario Recommendation 11 2 Expand government reviews of direct business support programs and tax expenditures to include supports such as business services procurement and publicly funded research and development Recommendation 11 3 Refocus the mandate of business support programs from job creation to productivity growth in the private sector Recommendation 11 4 Starting in 2012 13 make ministries responsible and accountable for tax expenditures that align with their respective program areas Ministries should initially be provided with the means to fund the tax expenditures i e a net zero impact for the ministries but after that they will have to manage the pooled envelope of tax expenditures and direct business support programs to meet budgetary targets Recommendation 11 5 Introduce a new funding model that encourages efficiency and harmonizes efforts across ministries We propose that money for both direct and indirect business support programs including refundable tax credits should be pooled into a single funding envelope Recommendation 11 6 Sunset all current direct business support programs in 2012 13 After accounting for legal commitments and legacy projects as well as the 2017 18 deficit reduction target pool the remaining funds and tax expenditures into a single envelope used to fund business support programs submitted by ministries These programs must align with the productivity focus of the government economic development policy and meet rigorous design criteria Recommendation 11 7 Follow the Public Sector Accounting Board PSAB recommendation to report transfers through the tax system as expenses and adopt the PSAB standard for tax revenue beginning with the 2012 Ontario Budget In 2011 Ontario provided refundable business tax credits tax credits that are refunded or paid out even if no tax is payable totalling 723 million to three main areas media industries research and development and apprenticeship and co op student training Many of these tax credits overlap with the objectives of direct business support programs and all should be subjected to the same degree of scrutiny as program spending Further gains could be achieved by making the tax system more neutral removing special preferences that favour some business activities over others and better aligning refundable corporate income tax credits with direct business support programs Recommendation 11 8 Introduce legislation to sunset all current refundable corporate income tax CIT credits in 2012 13 as part of the government s tax expenditure review Add refundable CIT credits that demonstrate effectiveness and administrative efficiency into the single envelope used to fund business support programs and include revenue forgone from those tax credits in the funding allocation of an appropriate ministry Recommendation 11 9 Restrict the Ontario small business deduction SBD for large Canadian controlled private corporations by paralleling the federal business limit reduction and include the Ontario SBD in the review of tax expenditures for effectiveness and administrative efficiency Recommendation 11 10 Work with the federal government to ensure that tax expenditures outside of Ontario s control maximize value for money and directly support economic growth in Ontario Recommendation 11 11 Review and rationalize the current provincial financial support provided to the horse racing industry so that the industry is more appropriately sustained by the wagering revenues it generates rather than through subsidies or their preferential treatments Recommendation 11 12 Eliminate the Ontario resource tax credit and review the mining tax system to ensure that the province is supporting the exploration and production of minerals in Ontario while receiving a fair return on its natural resources Recommendation 11 13 Establish a more user friendly one window portal where clients can have seamless access to information about all business support and other economic development programs provided by all ministries and be able to make online transactions such as applications approvals and financial and other types of reports Recommendation 11 14 Establish single shared back office support for all ministries in the delivery of their business support programs including contract administration payment processing expenditure tracking client contacts project milestones and outcomes Recommendation 11 15 Establish a four year sunset rule for all future business support programs Extend only programs that have demonstrated their merit through a mandatory comprehensive evaluation in the third year of operation and end all others Recommendation 11 16 Publish an annual list of direct business support programs tax expenditures and related annual spending In addition a list of companies receiving direct financial support from the government including total amount received should be published Chapter 12 Infrastructure Real Estate and Electricity Recommendation 12 1 Place more emphasis on achieving greater value from existing assets in asset management plan reporting requirements than is currently proposed in the Long Term Infrastructure Plan for certain organizations e g universities municipalities etc Recommendation 12 2 Implement full cost pricing for water and wastewater services Recommendation 12 3 Where gaps in information and evidence exist review the roles and operations

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  • The Drummond Report: List of Acronyms
    GBE government business enterprise GEO Global Experience Ontario GDP gross domestic product GTA Greater Toronto Area GTHA Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area HBAM Health Based Allocation Model HOOPP Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan HOT high occupancy toll lane HQO Health Quality Ontario HST harmonized sales tax I IT information and information technology ICES Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences ICT information and communications technology IESO Independent Electricity System Operator INAC Indian and Northern Affairs Canada IO Infrastructure Ontario IP intellectual property IPRC Identification Placement and Review Committee IPSP Integrated Power System Plan IT information technology JOT Justice On Target JSPP Jointly Sponsored Pension Plan LAO Legal Aid Ontario LCBO Liquor Control Board of Ontario LDC local distribution companies LHIN Local Health Integration Network LMA Labour Market Agreement LMDA Labour Market Development Agreement LSR Local Services Realignment LTC long term care LTEP Long Term Energy Plan LTIP Long Term Infrastructure Plan MAG Ministry of the Attorney General MCI Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration MCSCS Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services MCSS Ministry of Community and Social Services MEU municipal electrical utility MGS Ministry of Government Services MNDM Ministry of Northern Development and Mines MNR Ministry of Natural Resources MOE Ministry of the Environment MOHLTC Ministry of Health and Long Term Care MTCU Ministry of Training Colleges and Universities NAFTA North American Free Trade Agreement NPLC Nurse Practitioner Led Clinic OACP Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police OAPSB Ontario Association of Police Services Boards OCB Ontario Child Benefit OCEB Ontario Clean Energy Benefit OCT Ontario College of Teachers OCWA Ontario Clean Water Agency ODB Ontario Drug Benefit Program ODSP Ontario Disability Support Program OECD Organization for Economic Co operation and Development OECM Ontario Education Collaborative Marketplace OECTA Ontario English Catholic Teachers Association OEFC Ontario Electricity Financial Corporation OEPTC Ontario Energy and Property

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  • Commission on the Reform of Ontario's Public Services
    be eliminated or redesigned Areas of overlap and duplication that could be eliminated to save taxpayer dollars and Areas of value in the public sector that could provide a greater return on the investment made by taxpayers The commission will report to the Minister of Finance in time to inform the development of the 2012 Budget It will not make recommendations that would increase taxes or lead to the privatization of health care or education Reforming public service delivery is part of the plan laid out in Ontario s 2011 Budget Turning the Corner and reflects the government s continued commitment to attack waste find savings and ensure the best value for public money Quick Facts The 2011 Budget identified almost 1 5 billion over three years in new savings As outlined the 2011 Budget the McGuinty government is reforming public service delivery to help eliminate the deficit while protecting education and health care Ontario is taking action to cut the number of government agencies by five per cent In total fourteen agencies are being closed or merged Experiences in Canada and around the world have shown that deep across the board cuts would lead to increased costs in the long run Learn More Learn more about the Commission Chair and the Vice Chairs Learn more about how the government is finding savings and ensuring the best use of public money Ontario s Fiscal Cycle About Ontario s Fiscal Cycle Ontario Budget Expenditure Estimates Quarterly Finances Public Accounts Fall Economic Statement Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund Ontario s Economy About Our Economic Reports Weekly Economic Update Monthly Ontario Fact Sheet Quarterly Economic Accounts Long Term Report About Our Economic Reports Weekly Economic Update Monthly Ontario Fact Sheet Quarterly Economic Accounts Long Term Report Ontario s Tax System Audit Credits Benefits and

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  • Frequently Asked Questions
    is dependent on the applicant or the applicant s spouse or common law partner for support resides with the applicant is under 18 years of age and does not have a spouse common law partner or a child What is the definition of adjusted family net income Each component of the Ontario Trillium Benefit Ontario Sales Tax Credit Ontario Energy and Property Tax Credit Northern Ontario Energy Credit is calculated based on your adjusted family net income as calculated from information on your personal income tax and benefit return Generally adjusted family net income is equal to the sum of the net income amount on line 236 of the return for both you and your spouse common law partner if applicable minus any federal Universal Child Care Benefit payments UCCB and Registered Disability Savings Plan RDSP income either of you received plus any federal UCCB payments and RDSP income either of you repaid Adjusted Family Net Income calculation The net income amount on line 236 of the T1 for you if you are single or the sum of the net income amounts for you and your spouse or common law partner minus UCCB benefits RDSP benefits plus UCCB repayment RDSP repayment Ontario Trillium Benefit About the Benefit Frequently Asked Questions Ontario s Fiscal Cycle About Ontario s Fiscal Cycle Ontario Budget Expenditure Estimates Quarterly Finances Public Accounts Fall Economic Statement Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund Pre Budget Consultations About Ontario s Fiscal Cycle Ontario Budget Expenditure Estimates Quarterly Finances Public Accounts Fall Economic Statement Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund Pre Budget Consultations Ontario s Economy About Our Economic Reports Weekly Economic Update Monthly Ontario Fact Sheet Quarterly Economic Accounts Long Term Report About Our Economic Reports Weekly Economic Update Monthly Ontario Fact Sheet Quarterly Economic Accounts Long Term Report Ontario s Tax

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  • Ontario's Public Sector Salary Disclosure
    salary and taxable benefits the employer is reporting Employers will continue to report these employees on their own disclosure records THE PUBLIC SECTOR SALARY DISCLOSURE AMENDMENT ACT 2004 The Public Sector Salary Disclosure Amendment Act 2004 received Royal Assent on April 15 2004 SALARY DISCLOSURE IN ANNUAL REPORTS Employers that normally issue an annual report are required to include the salary disclosure with their annual report unless that disclosure is made available on a public website a corporate website or on the Ministry of Finance website as part of the PSSD Compendium HYDRO ONE AND ONTARIO POWER GENERATION SALARY DISCLOSURE This legislation specifies that Hydro One Inc Ontario Power Generation Inc and each of their subsidiaries are part of the public sector and designates them as public sector employers for the purposes of the act Hydro One Inc Ontario Power Generation Inc and each of their subsidiaries are required to provide salary disclosure to the Ministry of Energy This applies for 2004 and future years WHY CAN T I FIND SPECIFIC ORGANIZATIONS Many reasons can explain why you cannot find an organization After ensuring that the organization is not in any of the categories verify if the organization is included in the No Employee Salaries to Disclose Some organizations do not disclose because the funding received is under the threshold set by the funding condition explained above Ultimately the employer is responsible for making the disclosure or the statement of No Employee Salaries to Disclose available to the public WHAT S INCLUDED IN 100 000 SALARY The 100 000 figure means salary before taxes and does not include taxable benefits However for those who are paid 100 000 or more the total value of these taxable benefits must be disclosed Beginning with 2012 salaries the definition of salary now also includes per diems and or retainers paid to employees in addition to amounts reported as employment income on the Canada Revenue Agency T4 slip The act does not authorize employers to disclose what the specific benefits are I HAVE FOUND MISTAKES HOW CAN THEY BE CORRECTED If the information included in the Compendium has been reported incorrectly it can be corrected in the Addendum If you think some information has been reported incorrectly contact the organization This will allow the organization to verify the information and provide their ministry s Public Sector Salary Disclosure contact with accurate information for the Addendum COMPLIANCE All organizations that are covered by this act must prepare a list each year of the employees who were paid 100 000 or more the year before with their names positions salaries and the value of their taxable benefits Each organization must make the list available for inspection without charge between March 31 and December 31 of the year it is disclosed NON COMPLIANCE The Government of Ontario can withhold part or all of the transfer payment to an employer who did not disclose The funds would be paid however once the employer complies Employers who do not

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  • Public Sector Salary Disclosure
    organization A Organizations subject to the FLSA include ministries the judiciary the legislative assembly and Crown agencies Other organizations subject to the FLSA are those that the act designates as public service agencies Regulation 398 93 of the FLSA lists the organizations that have been designated as public service agencies Organizations not subject to the FLSA include universities school boards municipalities and Hydro One and Ontario Power Generation Q Who is responsible for translating organization names and employee position titles A Organizations are responsible for their own translations Q What is the deadline for providing French translations A Reporting deadlines remain the same All organizations subject to the PSSDA that have salaries to report must still submit all required information by the fifth business day of March For 2014 this is Friday March 7 Organizations subject to the FLSA must ensure that they also provide the name of their organization and employees job titles in French Q Where can I find more information A For more information please refer to the guide Preparing Your Report for the Year 2013 Public Sector Salary Disclosure Act For details about French language requirements please see Reporting Requirements for Organizations Subject to the French Language Services Act and Section 4 Organizations Subject to the French Language Services Act in the guide A list of ministry contacts is available at the end of the guide Ontario s Fiscal Cycle About Ontario s Fiscal Cycle Ontario Budget Expenditure Estimates Quarterly Finances Public Accounts Fall Economic Statement Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund Pre Budget Consultations About Ontario s Fiscal Cycle Ontario Budget Expenditure Estimates Quarterly Finances Public Accounts Fall Economic Statement Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund Pre Budget Consultations Ontario s Economy About Our Economic Reports Weekly Economic Update Monthly Ontario Fact Sheet Quarterly Economic Accounts Long Term Report

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  • Addendum/Addenda 2014
    123 239 58 1 148 78 Bluewater District School Board NOXEL TIMOTHY Principal 117 665 19 1 141 17 Bluewater District School Board OLSON JAN Assistant to the Superintendent of Education 132 346 55 1 533 00 Bluewater District School Board OZORIO MARK Principal 123 107 40 1 209 24 Bluewater District School Board PICKETT MATTHEW Principal 124 696 20 1 217 32 Bluewater District School Board PIERAGOSTINI HILTS LUCIA Vice Principal 110 467 55 1 086 83 Bluewater District School Board RAYNER DEBORAH Principal 117 315 26 1 143 34 Bluewater District School Board REIMER NAOMI Teacher 100 316 93 73 07 Bluewater District School Board RUSSELL DANIEL Principal 147 687 80 1 146 46 Bluewater District School Board SERBIN BRENDA Vice Principal 109 672 23 1 025 03 Bluewater District School Board SLATER SARAH Principal 115 699 14 1 134 78 Bluewater District School Board SMITH JEFFREY Teacher 101 076 65 73 07 Bluewater District School Board SMITH WENDORF PATRICIA Principal 115 699 14 1 134 78 Bluewater District School Board SPRAGG KAREN Vice Principal 105 822 82 1 151 98 Bluewater District School Board STEPHENSON JEAN Superintendent of Education 148 824 00 1 528 66 Bluewater District School Board STRONG ERIN Principal 109 435 38 1 048 05 Bluewater District School Board TANG ANDREA Principal 120 315 01 1 180 04 Bluewater District School Board TEMPLETON LORI Vice Principal 108 946 41 1 077 99 Bluewater District School Board THOMSON JOHN Teacher 102 403 92 73 07 Bluewater District School Board TRAVERSE THOMAS JACQUELINE Principal 123 732 97 1 205 99 Bluewater District School Board UTTLEY SHAW MARY MARTHA Principal 124 409 03 1 146 46 Bluewater District School Board VANDER DUIM AARON Teacher 100 940 94 73 07 Bluewater District School Board VOELKER MAURICE Principal 115 699 14 1 134 78 Bluewater District School Board WADDINGTON DAVID Principal 124 696 20 1 226 67 Bluewater District School Board WAINWRIGHT EVAN Principal 123 497 43 1 146 47 Bluewater District School Board WHITTON IAN Teacher 102 597 96 73 07 Bluewater District School Board WILDER LORI Superintendent of Education 148 824 00 1 388 28 Bluewater District School Board WILSON MARGARETHA Principal 110 278 26 1 080 02 Bluewater District School Board WOODLEY JOHN Manager of System Operations 124 966 06 1 460 64 Bluewater District School Board ZEMITIS LEONARD MAIJA Teacher 102 044 33 131 31 Sudbury Catholic District School Board ARNEW ROBERT Regional Internal Audit Manager 116 345 14 609 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board BAGNATO ROSSELLA Superintendent of Education 148 126 24 6 472 80 Sudbury Catholic District School Board BARRY AARON Secondary School Vice Principal 118 412 47 1 143 36 Sudbury Catholic District School Board BAZINET DENNIS Superintendent of Business Finance 148 126 24 5 997 80 Sudbury Catholic District School Board BIANCHIN LOUISA Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board BOZZO SALVADOR DIANA Elementary School Principal 110 541 16 1 182 12 Sudbury Catholic District School Board CHARBONNEAU DANIEL Secondary Teacher 104 125 23 312 12 Sudbury Catholic District School Board COLUZZI KIM Elementary School Vice Principal 105 014 22 1 154 40 Sudbury Catholic District School Board COMISSO JOSEPHINE Elementary School Vice Principal 104 625 53 1 114 55 Sudbury Catholic District School Board DEL RICCIO VINCENZO Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board DENOMME KRISTINE Elementary Teacher 101 386 06 798 60 Sudbury Catholic District School Board DOWDALL CIRELLI TRICIA Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board DREGER KARL Secondary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board DUBIEN SUZANNE Senior Manager of Human Resources 137 913 95 1 387 20 Sudbury Catholic District School Board DUGUAY HEATHER Secondary Teacher 100 881 19 296 01 Sudbury Catholic District School Board FAGGIONI SILVIA Secondary Teacher 100 062 93 296 01 Sudbury Catholic District School Board FRANKLIN LOUISE Elementary School Principal 113 001 35 1 195 76 Sudbury Catholic District School Board FRASER COLETTE Secondary Teacher 100 230 18 296 97 Sudbury Catholic District School Board GRANDMONT MICHEL Secondary Teacher 100 041 97 297 09 Sudbury Catholic District School Board HENRY MELODY Elementary School Principal 112 329 83 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board HIEBERT ST DENIS SANDRA Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board HOLDEN LORI Elementary School Vice Principal 110 129 97 1 142 40 Sudbury Catholic District School Board KUZENKO LAURA Secondary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board LAPALME CULLEN LUCIE Secondary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MACGREGOR CASSANDRA Secondary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MACNEILL GRAHAM Elementary Teacher 100 156 13 149 05 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MARDERO PATRICIA Secondary School Principal 122 448 12 1 241 16 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MATHIEU GUY Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 171 32 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MCCULLOUGH CATHERINE Director of Education 196 082 98 7 384 60 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MICHAUD JAMES Secondary School Vice Principal 110 541 16 1 182 12 Sudbury Catholic District School Board MURPHY MEGAN Elementary School Vice Principal 104 625 44 1 114 55 Sudbury Catholic District School Board PAPINEAU TERRY Superintendent of Education 134 215 27 6 399 12 Sudbury Catholic District School Board PERREAULT RAYMOND LIANNE Elementary Teacher 100 259 52 148 80 Sudbury Catholic District School Board PETRYNA LORRAINE Elementary School Principal 116 230 03 443 32 Sudbury Catholic District School Board PITMAN CARMELA Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board RASO FIORINA Elementary Teacher 101 777 66 148 39 Sudbury Catholic District School Board ROBILLARD GERALD Manager Information Management Systems 116 345 14 1 293 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board RUSSELL TIMOTHY Secondary Teacher 101 349 85 290 16 Sudbury Catholic District School Board SMET MITCHELL Secondary School Vice Principal 110 541 16 1 143 48 Sudbury Catholic District School Board SNOW NICOLE Superintendent of Education 133 329 12 6 417 18 Sudbury Catholic District School Board SOEHNER CARA Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board SOEHNER DAVID Elementary School Principal 116 345 14 1 209 96 Sudbury Catholic District School Board STARGRATT DANIEL Elementary School Vice Principal 105 014 34 1 154 40 Sudbury Catholic District School Board STIRRETT LAURA Elementary School Vice Principal 108 765 14 1 154 28 Sudbury Catholic District School Board SZWED BRIAN Secondary Teacher 101 143 88 285 48 Sudbury Catholic District School Board TIMPANO TINA Elementary School Vice Principal 104 625 48 1 114 67 Sudbury Catholic District School Board VAN DRUENEN STEPHANIE Secondary School Vice Principal 110 540 95 1 182 12 Sudbury Catholic District School Board WEMIGWANS DAWN MARIE Elementary School Principal 110 541 16 1 182 12 Sudbury Catholic District School Board ZAHRA LAURIE Elementary School Principal 116 285 21 1 209 96 Colleges Collèges Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables Niagara College Canada GRECZKO WALTER Chair School of Justice Studies 124 530 50 397 94 Niagara College Canada MCGRATH KAREN Director Library and Bookstore Services 117 806 10 141 51 Niagara College Canada PENTESCO DORITA Acting Director Marketing Communications 104 884 86 321 48 Niagara College Canada RUSSO LYN Director Development 124 530 51 397 94 Sheridan College Institute AITKEN SHARON Director Annual Awards and Alumni Relations 155 383 75 2 968 35 Sheridan College Institute ARTHUR MICHAEL Professor 118 682 50 173 45 Sheridan College Institute BRAGGINS DONNA Associate Dean 119 076 26 2 146 36 Sheridan College Institute CONDIE JOAN Associate Dean 137 337 03 2 617 66 Sheridan College Institute CUPIDO JUNE Associate Registrar 110 976 43 2 151 41 Sheridan College Institute DEIGHTON JENNIFER Senior Manager Development 101 246 91 1 854 81 Sheridan College Institute DESORMEAUX JEAN Professor 104 881 92 173 45 Sheridan College Institute DICKSON EMMA Associate Registrar 110 960 12 2 151 41 Sheridan College Institute DIMECH STEPHANIE Associate Dean 137 485 68 2 918 94 Sheridan College Institute FINCH RICHARD Dean 174 810 62 2 532 63 Sheridan College Institute FRAZER MARDY Associate Dean 115 987 78 1 708 59 Sheridan College Institute HENRY JOSEPH Associate Dean 109 902 05 2 112 39 Sheridan College Institute KARCZ KATHRYN Associate Dean 139 432 92 2 488 56 Sheridan College Institute KATZ YAEL Associate Dean 143 943 07 2 484 33 Sheridan College Institute MACFARLANE BRYAN Associate Registrar 110 976 43 2 151 41 Sheridan College Institute MALIK HASAN Dean 174 810 60 2 416 55 Sheridan College Institute NOCE MARY LOUISE Associate Dean 108 708 85 1 743 81 Sheridan College Institute ORLANDO MARK Associate Dean 125 147 04 2 614 42 Sheridan College Institute PERUCHO DANILO Manager Facilities Operations 103 174 48 645 81 Sheridan College Institute RAYEGANI FARZAD Associate Dean 148 449 97 2 638 99 Sheridan College Institute REID ALAN Associate Dean 150 073 52 2 670 68 Sheridan College Institute SHUH JANET Associate Dean 117 002 23 2 196 68 Sheridan College Institute STUBBS PHILIP Associate Dean 137 442 83 159 14 Sheridan College Institute WACKERLIN DAVE Associate Dean 133 852 67 2 818 53 Hospitals Boards of Public Health Hôpitaux et Conseils de santé Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables University Health Network JACKSON JUSTINE Executive Vice President 388 346 12 34 725 46 University Health Network MARTIN BELLA General Counsel And Corporate Secretary 237 070 20 28 670 61 Wingham District Hospital STANLEY ANGELA Vice President Clinical Services and Chief Nursing Officer 120 539 29 668 04 Other Public Sector Employers Autres employeurs du secteur public Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables Central West Community Care Access Centre HECIMOVICH CATHERINE Chief Executive Officer 267 333 47 2 757 14 Dufferin Child Family Services KEACHIE PATRICIA Executive Director 116 786 93 523 44 Dufferin Child Family Services MORRIS RUMINA Manager Central Intake 110 412 79 523 44 Montfort Renaissance Inc TARDIVEL JEANNE HÉLÈNE Directrice Générale 148 372 73 12 672 42 The John Howard Society of Ottawa WADEL DON Executive Director 108 604 24 0 00 Unionville Home Society GOODHAND JUANITA Director Long Term Care Operations 106 061 81 495 74 YMCA of Hamilton Burlington Brantford COMMERFORD JAMES President Chief Executive Officer 216 000 00 7 178 79 Additions to the March 28 2014 Disclosure for 2013 under the Public Sector Salary Disclosure Act 1996 Ajouts à la version du 28 mars 2014 de la Divulgation pour 2013 en vertu de la Loi de 1996 sur la divulgation des traitements dans le secteur public Crown Agencies Organismes de la Couronne Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables Office of the Fairness Commissioner Bureau du commissaire à l équité AUGUSTINE JEAN Fairness Commissioner Commissaire à l équité 114 114 00 0 00 Municipalities and Services Municipalités et services Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables Town of East Gwillimbury Public Library ALLEYNE MICHELLE Chief Executive Officer 101 899 00 331 68 School Boards Conseils scolaires Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables Upper Grand District School Board DEWEY RANDY Vice Principal Elementary 106 885 85 522 31 Upper Grand District School Board GROSE SHELLEY Principal Elementary 107 442 72 525 90 Upper Grand District School Board GUEST SUSAN Principal Elementary 118 525 61 579 73 Upper Grand District School Board GUYITT CHAD Vice Principal Elementary 103 560 70 506 90 Upper Grand District School Board HAMILTON PATRICK Principal Secondary 120 628 04 582 13 Upper Grand District School Board MORRIS HANNA Vice Principal Elementary 101 327 10 495 51 Upper Grand District School Board WILSON DEIDRE Principal Secondary 127 348 34 615 54 Universities Universités Employer Employeur Surname Nom de famille Given Name Prénom Position Poste Salary Paid Traitement Taxable Benefits Avantages Imposables Ontario College of Art Design University ASTMAN BARBARA Professor 111 956 84 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University BACK DOUG Associate Professor 102 721 01 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University BERGER ROBERT Associate Professor 106 518 16 75 39 Ontario College of Art Design University BOWES JEREMY Professor 117 369 90 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University BROWN VERONICA Director Campus Services and Security 110 195 42 600 72 Ontario College of Art Design University BRUNET CLAIRE Associate Professor 104 849 09 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University CARR HARRIS IAN Professor 108 128 81 0 00 Ontario College of Art Design University CASSADY JOHN Associate Professor 100 056 79 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University CHAVEL DAVID Associate Professor 107 547 59 0 00 Ontario College of Art Design University CLARK COLIN Manager Lead Architect Inclusive Design Research Centre 101 559 38 604 56 Ontario College of Art Design University CONTRERAS MONICA Director Digital Futures Implementation 116 184 12 0 00 Ontario College of Art Design University DALLAS PAUL Chair Illustration Professor 119 541 34 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University DEMPSEY PAUL Associate Professor 106 518 16 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University DEVINE BONNIE Chair Aboriginal Visual Culture Program 109 453 87 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University DONEGAN ROSEMARY Associate Professor 112 167 96 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University DOYLE JUDITH Chair Integrated Media Associate Professor 113 400 10 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University DUNKELMAN AVI Associate Professor 108 128 81 0 00 Ontario College of Art Design University EPP PAUL Chair Industrial Design Professor 117 011 71 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University FUNG RICHARD Associate Professor 106 518 16 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University GAFFAR ASHFAQ Director Academic Business Management 108 567 96 587 40 Ontario College of Art Design University GARDNER PAULA Associate Professor 102 323 09 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University GAY GREG Project Manager Inclusive Design Research Centre 101 559 38 604 56 Ontario College of Art Design University GIRAUDY CHERYL Associate Dean Faculty of Design Associate Professor 101 514 30 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University GLASS SIMON Associate Dean Faculty of Art Associate Professor 103 029 46 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University HICKOX APRIL Associate Professor 101 222 18 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University HINDS BRUCE Chair Environmental Design Associate Professor 102 767 11 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University HOUSEHOLDER JOHANNA Chair Criticism Curatorial Practice Professor 113 695 54 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University JOHNSON RAE Associate Professor 104 203 26 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University JONES SIMONE Associate Professor 100 950 10 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University KERR ANTHONY Chair Advertising Associate Professor 102 093 50 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University KNAFF JEAN CHRISTIAN Associate Professor 106 787 96 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University KRZYZANOWSKI STAN Associate Professor 108 567 96 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University LALIBERTE COLETTE Associate Professor 102 910 91 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University LANGILL CAROLINE Associate Dean Faculty of Art Associate Professor 114 093 50 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University LASHKO PETER Director Facilities Planning Management 116 184 12 692 16 Ontario College of Art Design University LEE DARIN Director Enterprise Resource Planning Implementation 116 184 12 692 16 Ontario College of Art Design University LEEMING BILL Associate Professor 104 385 94 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University LEGARE GINETTE Associate Professor 108 192 06 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University MAHLER HARRY Professor 104 310 51 129 24 Ontario College of Art Design University MANU ALEX Professor 115 721 35 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University MCALLISTER ANDREW Manager Academic Computing Management 101 028 98 600 72 Ontario College of Art Design University MCINTOSH DAVID Associate Professor 106 534 36 194 24 Ontario College of Art Design University MILGRAM LYNNE Professor 117 498 06 154 04 Ontario College of Art Design University MILLARD LAURA Associate Professor 107 806 79 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University NAY ERIC Associate Dean Liberal Arts Sciences and School of Interdisciplinary Studies Associate Professor 114 509 36 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University NICHOLSON LEWIS Associate Professor 100 625 94 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University NIND SARAH Associate Professor 108 316 09 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University PANTON DOUG Coordinator of First Year Design Student Success Associate Professor 104 004 56 129 24 Ontario College of Art Design University PARADIS ELISABETH Registrar 116 067 54 684 54 Ontario College of Art Design University PELLETIER DAVID Associate Professor 111 484 65 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University PHILLIPS PAULETTE Professor 116 516 94 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University PROKOPOW MICHAEL Graduate Program Director Criticism and Curatorial Practice and Contemporary Art and Design New Media Art Histories 112 468 70 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University QUINLAN STEVE Professor 113 015 06 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University REID COLLEEN Associate Dean Design Academic Affairs and Professor 118 246 28 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University REID STUART Professor 113 249 90 294 24 Ontario College of Art Design University RICHARDS JAN Project Manager Inclusive Design Research Centre 101 559 38 604 56 Ontario College of Art Design University RUSHTON KEITH Professor 113 511 06 0 00 Ontario College

    Original URL path: http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/publications/salarydisclosure/2014/addenda_14.html (2015-07-13)
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