archive-ca.com » CA » P » PFIZERSTRIVE.CA

Total: 327

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Obesity and cardiovascular risk
    been taking a closer look at obesity They have increasingly found that while all obesity is a health risk some patterns of overweight deserve particular attention The importance of weight One way to measure whether you are overweight for your height is to calculate your Body Mass Index BMI This is your weight in kilograms divided by your height in metres squared If you don t think in metric multiply your weight in pounds by 703 then divide that by your height in inches then divide by your height in inches again There are many BMI calculators online According to the World Health Organization BMIs are categorized as follows Under 18 5 is underweight 18 5 to 24 9 is a healthy weight 25 to 29 9 is considered overweight 30 or more is considered obese The importance of waist While all overweight is important research has shown that fat around the waist indicates a higher than average risk of developing diabetes or having a heart attack or a stroke regardless of your BMI Waist fat is assessed either by directly measuring the size of your waist or by calculating your waist hip ratio divide your waist measurement at its smallest by your hip measurement at its widest How big is too big It depends on your ethnicity family history body type and age but in general men should be concerned if they have either a waist measurement of 40 inches 102 cm or more or a waist hip ratio of more than 0 90 an apple shaped body Similarly women should be concerned if they have a waist measurement of 35 inches 88 cm or more or a waist hip ratio of more than 0 85 Even a small increase in waist size can affect your health One study

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/heart_health/obesity_and_cardiovascular_risk (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Don’t bring it home – reasons to get travel vaccinations
    Review your vaccination history Vaccinations can lose their potency over time so make sure to stay up to date according to the vaccination standards in your area Assess risks of disease based on factors such as your age destination and any pre existing health conditions Learn about the different types of vaccinations What you don t know can hurt you Routine recommended and required The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC puts travel vaccines into three categories Routine Basic vaccinations regardless of travel plans Recommended Vaccinations that are recommended when travelling depend on several factors Your destination and health alerts in that area When you plan to travel season Whether you ll be visiting rural areas Your history age health status previous immunizations Required Certain vaccinations are required per International Health Regulations depending on where and when you ll be travelling Commonly recommended vaccines Depending on where you re going and when your travel clinic will have advice on what vaccinations you may need to prevent specific diseases common to your destination Health Canada has a comprehensive list of diseases that can be prevented by vaccination Stay up to date As there are new outbreaks of diseases in different

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/travel_health/dont_bring_it_home (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Jet lag – how it affects your internal clock and how to beat it
    than crossing the same number of time zones to the west You don t get jet lag when going north or south since that doesn t mean a change in time zones Symptoms of jet lag Daytime sleepiness Nighttime wakefulness Fatigue Irritability Tummy troubles Headaches Nausea Tips to beat jet lag Before you go Adjust your sleep routine If you re flying east start going to bed and waking up earlier for a few days before leaving to advance your body clock do the reverse if you re heading west Top up on sleep The last thing you need is a sleep deficit when facing down the possibility of jet lag Plan a stopover Combine a nice inter terminal leg stretch with the chance for your body s clock to catch up to whatever midway time zone you happen to be in In flight Hydrate Drink plenty of liquids but avoid beverages with caffeine or alcohol since they re dehydrating and can also disturb sleep Set your clock to the time zone you ll be landing in If it s daytime there try to stay awake during the flight Otherwise Sleep Earplugs and eye masks can help At your destination Use light therapy Sunlight can help reset your internal clock Get plenty of it but time it depending on whether you ve gone east or west If you went east soak up the early rays and keep your sunglasses handy in the afternoon If you went west get that light later in the day shading your eyes in the early morning The math can get tricky so take advantage of online jet lag calculators to help with this Eat wisely Carbs make you sleepy and protein stimulates alertness so let food help regulate your sleep and be sure to eat

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/travel_health/jet_lag (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Travelling with a medical condition – tips for a smooth trip
    taking any kind of prescription medication Have mobility issues Prepare your medications Be sure to pack extra of any prescription or over the counter medications you take Carry copies of all original prescriptions in case they need to be refilled Enquire as to the legality of your medications in your destination country Bring an official doctor s note documenting your medical condition and Rx lists Keep all meds in original labelled containers to avoid customs problems Identify Carry I D cards or wear bracelets or tags that will readily identify your medical condition s to medical professionals in case of emergency Get insured Many government and private health insurance programs won t cover you if you get sick or injured while abroad and foreign healthcare can get costly particularly when it s emergency care Carry proof of your supplemental travel health insurance Leave a copy of the travel health insurance information with a friend or relative in case you lose yours Vaccinate Vaccinations can help prevent you from catching any number of illnesses abroad As you age your older vaccines decrease in effectiveness and the risk for contracting new illnesses increases so it s important to stay up to date Pack a travel health kit It s always good to be prepared for emergencies Standard items to include would be your currently prescribed medications sunscreen OTC remedies first aid supplies bug spray and condoms For more information check out Health Canada s comprehensive Travel Health Kit list Do some reading The government of Canada has created some very helpful guides to travel and health that are easy to download and print for free Bon Voyage But Essential Information for Canadian Travellers 2011 2012 Especially handy is the section on keeping track of consulates all over the world since services offered

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/travel_health/travelling_with_a_medical_condition (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Travellers' Diarrhea - how to avoid it and what to do if it happens
    Abdominal cramps Fever Bloating General malaise Prevention Since prevention is the better part of the cure the smartest thing you can do for your health when travelling is to minimize risk by following basic food and water safety precautions Boil it cook it peel it or leave it As wonderful as raw fruits and veggies are for your health it s best to save them for when you get home This is true even if they have been washed since substandard water sanitation is one of the biggest causes of bacterial infection The same goes for meat and fish i e steak tartare and sushi Only use purified water for drinking or brushing your teeth Either buy commercially bottled water or water that s been boiled or chemically disinfected Avoid ice unless you know it s been made with purified water Avoid unpasteurized dairy and ice cream They re more susceptible to contamination Leave the street food on the street It s fun to sample new cuisines from local markets but it s impossible to be certain of the hygienic conditions of a food cart Respect food temperature safety rules Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold to avoid creating a bacteria friendly environment Wash your hands often especially after using the toilet or changing a diaper Use soap hot water and really scrub between your fingers under your fingernails and all over your hands and wrists Carry alcohol based hand sanitizers In a pinch they re better than nothing and they fit neatly into purses and pockets Stock up before you leave town Your doctor may recommend medications in case of emergency Treatment Since travellers diarrhea can strike even the most seasoned adventurer here are some tips for dealing and healing Hydrate Oral rehydration is key in replacing

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/travel_health/travellers_diarrhea (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Fighting cold and flu
    caused by small germs called viruses that invade the body and reproduce causing cold or flu symptoms In Canada cold and flu season stretches from November to April The common cold is a term used to describe a cluster of upper respiratory symptoms that can be caused by several different viruses Usually colds aren t serious and the symptoms are milder than symptoms of the flu The influenza virus also causes respiratory symptoms but this infection can be more serious In infants elderly people pregnant women or people with conditions like anemia cancer chronic respiratory disease diabetes HIV or heart or kidney disease the flu can even be life threatening Protect yourself The cold and flu viruses are spread through contact with droplets coughed sneezed or breathed into the environment by infected people You get these viruses by breathing in these droplets or touching contaminated surfaces and then touching your eyes nose or mouth There are several ways to protect yourself and others from getting a cold or the flu If you re not sick you can help prevent yourself from getting a cold or the flu by doing these things Clean and disinfect common surfaces tables telephones etc Wash your hands often using soap and warm water Eat healthy foods Get enough sleep Get immunized flu Keep your hands away from your face Lower stress levels Stay active Use hand sanitizer If you have a cold or the flu you can avoid spreading it by doing these things Clean and disinfect common surfaces tables telephones etc Cough and sneeze into your sleeve not your hand Stay home Throw used tissues out right away and then wash your hands Use hand sanitizer Wash your hands often using soap and warm water How can I feel better If you get a

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/infectious_disease/fighting_cold_and_flu (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The ABCs of hepatitis
    or have dark urine or get jaundice a yellow colour in your skin and eyes Most people with hepatitis A get better naturally but some people can have a relapse where the virus comes back Once you recover completely from hepatitis A you become immune to getting the disease again Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is passed on through sexual contact or blood or other body fluids Many people with hepatitis B recover and develop lifelong immunity as with hepatitis A However in other people with hepatitis B especially in people who were born to mothers with the disease the condition can become chronic Hepatitis B is 100 times more infectious than the HIV virus Hepatitis B can also be prevented by safer sex practices safe medical practices and not sharing needles personal hygiene items or drug paraphernalia You can have hepatitis B and not know it as often there are no symptoms But the 15 of people who develop chronic hepatitis B can end up with serious liver trouble like cirrhosis or cancer so stopping the spread of the disease is important Hepatitis C Hepatitis C is chronic for 90 of the people who get it Most people don t get rid of the virus but have to deal with it for life Chronic infection can lead to profound fatigue liver cancer or cirrhosis It s passed on by exposure to infected blood About half of hepatitis C is seen in people who inject drugs but you can also get it from tattooing or body piercing In Canada 70 of people with hepatitis C don t even know they have it and there is currently no vaccine for it Hepatitis C can have no symptoms at all or it can cause fatigue stomach pain uneasiness or jaundice in addition to

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/infectious_disease/the_abcs_of_hepatitis (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive

  • West Nile virus
    or swollen lymph glands A few people however can have a serious reaction to the virus and may have long term health problems or even die as a result Serious long term problems that are possible include muscle weakness paralysis fatigue and headache problems thinking depression and difficulty functioning People with a weakened immune system are more likely to have a serious reaction but it could happen to anyone West Nile virus Serious symptoms Severe headache High fever Stiff neck Vomiting Drowsiness Confusion Fainting Muscle weakness Paralysis Mosquito proofing Most people aren t at risk of being bitten by a mosquito infected with West Nile virus however you should take action to avoid mosquitos anyway To lower your risk of mosquito bites do the following Avoid being outside at dawn and dusk times of high mosquito activity Clean out eavestroughs Empty pools of standing water in your yard Make sure door and window screens fit snugly and don t have holes in them Use insect repellent Wear clothing that is light coloured and covers your arms and legs Wear a hat You probably don t have a high risk of exposure to West Nile virus but there s a lot

    Original URL path: https://www.pfizerstrive.ca/education/articles/infectious_disease/west_nile_virus (2016-04-28)
    Open archived version from archive