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  • Phys 215 Project -- Training, Sign-up, Logistics
    should also ensure that they know who in their group is responsible for picking up and returning keys Students who sign up are expected to show up unless the group has mutually agreed that the weather is too poor to observe Inclement Weather There will be some sessions during which the weather will not cooperate for observing If this would be the student s first time at the telescope he she is expected to go to the observatory anyway and familiarize him herself with at least the software without opening the dome If the student is already familiar with the software then the observing session may be cancelled provided everyone in the observing group agrees and provided the decision is made within a few hours of the start of the observing session This is because the weather can change rapidly in Kingston and the weather forecast should not be unquestioningly relied upon Thus students who are observing together must ensure that they are in communication with each other over this timescale It is a cardinal sin to cancel an observing session which turns out to have favourable weather Keys The designated key person must pick up keys Mondays between 11 00 a m and 11 30 a m and Tuesdays through Fridays between 11 00 a m and 12 00 noon from either Doug McNeil s office Room 359 or Rupinder Brar s office Room 356 One of these people will be in their office at that time This means that weekend observers must pick up keys on Friday Students must leave their student ID card in order to get keys Keys must be returned by 11 00 a m the following day except in the case of weekend observing Friday Saturday and Sunday observers in which case they are to be returned by 11 00 a m Monday morning They can be slipped under the door if Doug McNeil is not in Observing Help For the first session after the initial training session the TA Rupinder Brar Office Phone 533 6000 X 77754 Home Phone 531 5275 will be available to assist students Note that students must contact the TA in advance to specifically request this assistance After this students are expected to observe without the TA being present though he may be contacted by phone if there is a problem The observatory coordinator Doug McNeil should only be contacted in the event of equipment breakdown not for questions about the project or routine operations Disclaimer This is a new system and has not been put thoroughly put through its paces yet Expect things to occasionally go wrong See below for emergency help SAFETY NO STUDENT MAY OBSERVE ALONE If only one student has signed up for observing then the observing session must be cancelled Safety is clearly of concern when students are working at night We strongly recommend that you avail yourselves of Queen s Walk Home Service which operates Sunday to Wednesday until 2 a m and

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy215/y2002/project_logistics.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 215 Project Instructions
    by March 18 should contact R Brar about accessing and reducing previously obtained data III Data Reductions A The Data Reduction Computers and Accessing Data B The Data Reduction Software C Standard Corrections and Photometry D Reduction to V Magnitudes All V magnitudes should be entered into the database by March 25 IV The Light Curve and Period Determination V Progress Report Cancelled in Year 2002 VI The Final Report

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy215/y2002/project_instructions.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 315 Project
    Tables are good and will help you organize for the data reduction and for the final report Indicate any particular challenges or difficulties that you had and whether more observing is still required If you have not obtained any data please indicate why The progress report is worth 5 and the final report is worth 20 However when you hand in the final report you will include the material which

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy315/project/y2014/progress_report.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 315 Project
    run into Some of this you ve already done for the progress report All plots should be labelled and clear Don t forget to include sample images with your target star and reference stars marked Appendices are useful when the information is bulky Include a clear outline of your data reduction and pay particular attention to the errors so that you can say with confidence or without as the case

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy315/project/y2014/final_report.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 315 Project Instructions
    will be useless We call this time simply overheads At large world class telescopes overheads can take typically 25 of all telescope time and sometimes more Overheads includes the time required to take calibration images darks flats and the time required to physically move the telescope When you generate a plan an estimate for these extras will be given to you Use the V filter give your plan a name and enter the information requested What parameters will result in good data This is not always easy to know and so what you might consider is doing a short test run with varying times on source for a few objects of different brightness but note that the counts will also vary depending on where the object is in the sky and what the sky conditions are like I used 120 s duration observations and obtained 40 frames on an exoplanetary system that had a brightness of V 12 7 magnitudes This produced peak counts on the system of a few thousand which was suitable The system which was known to have an eclipse depth of 0 02 2 from the ETD was indeed detectable but I should have had more observations before and after the eclipse start and end respectively and more data points during the eclipse so as to delineate the shape of the curve better Therefore I would use 60s integration times in the future and would observe for at least half an hour on either side of the eclipse If possible I d try to find a brighter system which would give better signal to noise say brighter than V 11 but be careful with this because you must not let the counts exceed about 65 000 for either your system or the comparison star that you choose if you do you ll have to throw those data away I suggest that you focus every 30 minutes and re center the telescope every 60 minutes see boxes to tick at bottom Remember that higher magnitudes mean fainter objects Remember also that V V ref 2 5 log f f ref The counts that you measure on the CCD can be roughly interpreted as flux though technically the flux is counts times number of pixels occupied by the signal This will help you do a rough scaling between magnitude and counts if you need to D Make a Reservation Click on make a reservation at left to reserve the telescope Careful of the time The EDT gives times in UT whereas you set up the observations according the local time at the telescope I recommend that you watch the observations during a test run to see what the telescope does When you do the real run you can be asleep II Carry out the Observing and Download your Data As indicated above doing a small test run will help you see how the system works but it is not necessary to be present unless you want to when

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy315/project/y2014/project_instructions.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 372 Assignments
    separation between molecules and how does this compare to the typical size of a molecule Would any of the answers change if we switched from dry air to some other gas such as He b What is the mean molecular weight μ and the mass of a mole of moist air at T 20 degrees C when the relative humidity is 100 see this graph for data c The main constituents of Mars atmosphere are by number fraction CO 2 96 N 2 2 and Ar 2 What is the mass of a mole of Martian air Click on the Temperature of Mars today link on the Phy 372 home page and consider the coldest air temperature and the mean atmospheric pressure for today meaning the day you do this assignment What is the mass density ρ kg m 3 of this cold air For the same temperature of dry air on the Earth check Wikipedia to see whether the Earth s temperature is ever this cold find ρ Mars ρ Earth 2 Prob 1 17 of the text with the following additions for part a you will need to solve a quadratic equation for V n There will be

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy372/y2015/assignment1.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 372 Assignments
    web page For κ T feel free to use any method that you are comfortable with Would you typically expect a RTv or a RTv and why 2 A certain gas is studied in the lab for which the following response functions are found where a is a constant Find the equation of state and express the result in a form that is typical for a gas e g P V on the left hand side of the equation If you have introduced a new constant into the result suggest what it might represent 3 Imagine a molecule in a gas that is shaped like a pyramid The base is square with one atom at each corner and there is one atom at the top 5 atoms total Molecular bonds exist along all of the edges but not diagonally across the square base How many degrees of freedom does such a molecule have ignore the possibility of degrees of freedom being frozen out 4 Indicate whether the following would be heat or work Specify whether heat is entering or leaving the system or indicate whether work is being done on or by the system a Your system is some ice

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy372/y2015/assignment2.html (2016-02-13)
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  • Phys 372 Assignments
    1 Do Prob 1 33 in the text 2 Do Prob 1 38 in the text 3 Consider a 10 m 3 volume containing 8 kg of oxygen at a temperature of 300 K Compute the work done in compressing this volume to 5 m 3 for the following 3 cases a isobaric compression b isothermal compression c adiabatic compression For each case also find the final pressure and temperature

    Original URL path: http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~irwin/phy372/y2015/assignment3.html (2016-02-13)
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