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  • LPIF Annual Report
    1 35 Community Radio Access in Southern Canada 1 1 36 Public Alerting Systems Policy Journalistic Standards and Practices Children and Youth Civil Disturbances Clandestine Methods Complaints Conflict of Interest Consumer Reporting Corrections Court Reporting Crime and Police Reporting Emergency Broadcaster CBC s Role Interviews Investigative Journalism Language Live Reporting Opinion Politics Privacy Production Production online and digital media Science and Health Sources Use of Social Media User Generated Content UGC War Terror and Natural Disasters Advertising Standards 1 3 1 Objectives and Values 1 3 2 Truth in Advertising 1 3 3 Standards of Taste and Fair Representation 1 3 4 Advertiser Identification 1 3 5 Endorsement 1 3 6 Program Integrity 1 3 7 Language of Broadcast 1 3 8 Advertising Directed to Children Under 12 Years of Age 1 3 9 Advocacy Advertising 1 3 10 Political Advertising 1 3 11 Unacceptable Advertising 1 3 12 Contests and Games of Chance 1 3 13 Alcoholic Beverage Advertising 1 3 14 Access to Advertiser Property 1 3 15 Advertising Limits 1 3 16 Provincial Regulations Public Service Announcements 1 4 Public Service Announcements Free Time Political Broadcasts Official Languages Reports and Plans Corporate Policies Legal Services 2 4 1 Legal Services 2 4 2 Legal Proceedings Corporate Secreteriat 2 9 1 Records and Information Management 2 9 2 Personal Information and Privacy Protection 2 9 3 Delegation of Signing Authority 2 9 4 Disclosure of Wrongdoings Whistleblower Policy 2 9 5 Access to Information Privacy Protection Privacy Standards 2 9 6 Email Management 2 9 7 Information Classification Policy Communications 2 1 1 Communications Information Technology 2 5 1 Use of Technology Assets Human Resources 2 2 1 Staffing 2 2 2 Employment Equity 2 2 3 Conflict of Interest and Ethics 2 2 4 Compensation 2 2 10 Discipline 2 2 11 Appeal Procedures 2 2 13 Relocation 2 2 14 Official Languages 2 2 15 Anti Discrimination and Harassment 2 2 16 Occupational Health Safety and Environment 2 2 17 Political Activity 2 2 19 Industrial Relations 2 2 20 Non Discrimination and the Duty to Accommodate 2 2 21 Code of Conduct 2 2 22 Prevention of Work Place Violence Finance and Administration 2 3 2 Assets 2 3 3 Capital Leases 2 3 4 Cash Funds 2 3 5 Cheque Control 2 3 6 Procurement 2 3 7 Credit and Collections 2 3 8 Delegation of Financial Authorities 2 3 11 Fraud and Theft 2 3 14 Improvements to Leased Property 2 3 15 Full Program Costing Labour and Facilities Cost Rates 2 3 17 Management of Foreign Currency Risk 2 3 18 Payment of Sales Commissions 2 3 20 Reciprocal Trade Contra 2 3 21 Revenue Recording and Reporting 2 3 22 Shared Use of Transmitter Sites and Facilities 2 3 24 TV Program Inventories Recording and Valuation 2 3 28 Independent Contracts 2 3 29 Management of Investments 2 3 30 Fleet Management 2 3 31 Property and Casualty Insurance 2 3

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/reports/submissions/lpif-annual-report/ (2016-02-06)
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  • Note from Paul Jané
    Under 12 Years of Age 1 3 9 Advocacy Advertising 1 3 10 Political Advertising 1 3 11 Unacceptable Advertising 1 3 12 Contests and Games of Chance 1 3 13 Alcoholic Beverage Advertising 1 3 14 Access to Advertiser Property 1 3 15 Advertising Limits 1 3 16 Provincial Regulations Public Service Announcements 1 4 Public Service Announcements Free Time Political Broadcasts Official Languages Reports and Plans Corporate Policies Legal Services 2 4 1 Legal Services 2 4 2 Legal Proceedings Corporate Secreteriat 2 9 1 Records and Information Management 2 9 2 Personal Information and Privacy Protection 2 9 3 Delegation of Signing Authority 2 9 4 Disclosure of Wrongdoings Whistleblower Policy 2 9 5 Access to Information Privacy Protection Privacy Standards 2 9 6 Email Management 2 9 7 Information Classification Policy Communications 2 1 1 Communications Information Technology 2 5 1 Use of Technology Assets Human Resources 2 2 1 Staffing 2 2 2 Employment Equity 2 2 3 Conflict of Interest and Ethics 2 2 4 Compensation 2 2 10 Discipline 2 2 11 Appeal Procedures 2 2 13 Relocation 2 2 14 Official Languages 2 2 15 Anti Discrimination and Harassment 2 2 16 Occupational Health Safety and Environment 2 2 17 Political Activity 2 2 19 Industrial Relations 2 2 20 Non Discrimination and the Duty to Accommodate 2 2 21 Code of Conduct 2 2 22 Prevention of Work Place Violence Finance and Administration 2 3 2 Assets 2 3 3 Capital Leases 2 3 4 Cash Funds 2 3 5 Cheque Control 2 3 6 Procurement 2 3 7 Credit and Collections 2 3 8 Delegation of Financial Authorities 2 3 11 Fraud and Theft 2 3 14 Improvements to Leased Property 2 3 15 Full Program Costing Labour and Facilities Cost Rates 2 3 17 Management of Foreign Currency Risk 2 3 18 Payment of Sales Commissions 2 3 20 Reciprocal Trade Contra 2 3 21 Revenue Recording and Reporting 2 3 22 Shared Use of Transmitter Sites and Facilities 2 3 24 TV Program Inventories Recording and Valuation 2 3 28 Independent Contracts 2 3 29 Management of Investments 2 3 30 Fleet Management 2 3 31 Property and Casualty Insurance 2 3 32 Risk Management Real Estate 2 11 1 Parking 2 11 2 Construction and Tenant Alteration 2 11 3 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Tenant 2 11 4 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Landlord Policy on Business Continuity Program Policy on Employee Related Expenses and Reimbursements Policy on Accounting and Financial Reporting Policy on the CBC Radio Canada Pension Plan Funding Policy on Leave Policy on Learning Development and Performance Corporate By Laws Terms of use CBC Digital Services Transparency and Accountability Access to Information Documents released in answer to ATI requests of general interest Agendas Audits Board of Directors Meetings Expenses External Legal Fees Miscellaneous Policies Retreats Requests How to submit an ATI request Transparency and Accountability

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/note-from-paul-jane/ (2016-02-06)
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  • Note from Dany Harrison
    Production Production online and digital media Science and Health Sources Use of Social Media User Generated Content UGC War Terror and Natural Disasters Advertising Standards 1 3 1 Objectives and Values 1 3 2 Truth in Advertising 1 3 3 Standards of Taste and Fair Representation 1 3 4 Advertiser Identification 1 3 5 Endorsement 1 3 6 Program Integrity 1 3 7 Language of Broadcast 1 3 8 Advertising Directed to Children Under 12 Years of Age 1 3 9 Advocacy Advertising 1 3 10 Political Advertising 1 3 11 Unacceptable Advertising 1 3 12 Contests and Games of Chance 1 3 13 Alcoholic Beverage Advertising 1 3 14 Access to Advertiser Property 1 3 15 Advertising Limits 1 3 16 Provincial Regulations Public Service Announcements 1 4 Public Service Announcements Free Time Political Broadcasts Official Languages Reports and Plans Corporate Policies Legal Services 2 4 1 Legal Services 2 4 2 Legal Proceedings Corporate Secreteriat 2 9 1 Records and Information Management 2 9 2 Personal Information and Privacy Protection 2 9 3 Delegation of Signing Authority 2 9 4 Disclosure of Wrongdoings Whistleblower Policy 2 9 5 Access to Information Privacy Protection Privacy Standards 2 9 6 Email Management 2 9 7 Information Classification Policy Communications 2 1 1 Communications Information Technology 2 5 1 Use of Technology Assets Human Resources 2 2 1 Staffing 2 2 2 Employment Equity 2 2 3 Conflict of Interest and Ethics 2 2 4 Compensation 2 2 10 Discipline 2 2 11 Appeal Procedures 2 2 13 Relocation 2 2 14 Official Languages 2 2 15 Anti Discrimination and Harassment 2 2 16 Occupational Health Safety and Environment 2 2 17 Political Activity 2 2 19 Industrial Relations 2 2 20 Non Discrimination and the Duty to Accommodate 2 2 21 Code of Conduct 2 2 22 Prevention of Work Place Violence Finance and Administration 2 3 2 Assets 2 3 3 Capital Leases 2 3 4 Cash Funds 2 3 5 Cheque Control 2 3 6 Procurement 2 3 7 Credit and Collections 2 3 8 Delegation of Financial Authorities 2 3 11 Fraud and Theft 2 3 14 Improvements to Leased Property 2 3 15 Full Program Costing Labour and Facilities Cost Rates 2 3 17 Management of Foreign Currency Risk 2 3 18 Payment of Sales Commissions 2 3 20 Reciprocal Trade Contra 2 3 21 Revenue Recording and Reporting 2 3 22 Shared Use of Transmitter Sites and Facilities 2 3 24 TV Program Inventories Recording and Valuation 2 3 28 Independent Contracts 2 3 29 Management of Investments 2 3 30 Fleet Management 2 3 31 Property and Casualty Insurance 2 3 32 Risk Management Real Estate 2 11 1 Parking 2 11 2 Construction and Tenant Alteration 2 11 3 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Tenant 2 11 4 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Landlord Policy on Business Continuity Program Policy on Employee Related Expenses and

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/note-from-dany-harrison/ (2016-02-06)
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  • Cloud Services
    Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Cloud Services Rob Fullerton has been with CBC Radio Canada for ten years within the online digital group His roles have included Database Administrator System Administrator Development Team Lead Syndication Manager Project Manager and his current role of Platform Product Manager His team manages the platform of tools used to publish and distribute content to the audience via CBC ca Introduction The concept of Clouds with respect to both corporate and personal computing is currently one of the hottest topics of discussion in technological circles Like most hot topics its label is often used but rarely understood The purpose of this article is to bring some clarity to what the Cloud can mean i e Cloud computing Cloud services etc as well as why it is important to understand the subject It is not the intention of this article to represent Cloud services as being good or bad in general or for CBC Radio Canada or to make any specific recommendations What Does Cloud Mean Like most general information a basic definition of Cloud computing can be found on Wikipedia Cloud computing is the delivery of computing as a service rather than a product whereby shared resources software and information are provided to computers and other devices as a utility like the electricity grid over a network typically the Internet This definition is necessarily vague as there are many divergent definitions of what Cloud computing specifically means and what are its benefits and drawbacks This article will use the term Cloud computing to refer specifically to technical implementations and Cloud services to be both the technical implementations and their related support activities Computing Memories As a first step in making sense of this we will take a quick look at how computing has evolved over time The mainframe systems of decades past were essentially large central computing systems accessed by remote terminals over a network of some kind Decades ago this was a necessary configuration for a simple reason computing was horrendously expensive and the physical requirements of computers were massive Moreover the type of data being managed through terminals was generally text based which was feasible with the networking capabilities of the time Thus it made sense to centralise the expensive bits of the system CPUs RAM storage HVAC maintenance personnel in one location and keep terminals very lightweight The other huge advantage of this is that the computing resources were shared among many users meaning that they were less likely to be idle at any given time Over time computing power became continuously and exponentially cheaper as well as more accessible At the same time end user requirements also became exponentially more complex and demanding Furthermore the type of data being worked with moved from text based to binary application data audio video etc which exceeded the feasible capacity of networks These trends conspired to make it more economical to place more computing resources on the end user s desk replacing the thin client terminal with a thick client capable of functions that were previously only within the domain of more powerful central computing systems Commodity Computing Over the past ten years or so the aforementioned trend has been reversing for a few reasons Firstly the rise of the Internet as a ubiquitous platform together with browser based information access a thin client system by definition have brought the idea of remotely accessing data and functions to the mainstream We will discuss several examples later on but Web based email is a good one for now The other primary driver of course is cost Whereas in the heyday of mainframe systems still used in niche markets today computing technology was expensive computing management is expensive now Having thick clients scattered all over a user group be it internal to a business or a public audience significantly complicates support Compared to centralised systems configurations tend to diverge which makes troubleshooting very difficult and the ability to physically interact with systems in need of support is more difficult and in some cases impossible The rise of new kinds of mobile clients smart phones tablets etc is massively increasing support cost and complexity Simultaneously technology has evolved to the point where computing resources processing networking storage applications etc can be allocated over a network to a user or company as needed virtually in real time This has given rise to the model of computing services being available as a commodity Common analogies are drawn between this model and those of utility services which manage the fractional demands of customers for a pool of physical resources such as electricity or gas as the load balancing philosophy is similar The concept of commodity computing services will be examined in detail later in this article Categories of Cloud Services As also described on the main Wikipedia page there are a few different paradigms within which Cloud computing can be categorised The usefulness of each one depends on the context in which it is employed Services Paradigm In this model types of Cloud services are categorised based on which tiers of technology are managed by someone else The service provider may be another company a group within the same company or both see the Deployment Paradigm section below To more easily understand what this means take a look at Figure 1 The following is a brief explanation of what each element in the stack is Applications built on the platforms described below they use and or produce data for some useful purpose This can be anything from the GroupWise email client to database server software Microsoft Word or air traffic control software Data the pieces of information that applications use i e documents audio video database tables emails log files etc Runtime environment another level of software platform that enables the creation and execution of standards based applications e g Sun Java and Microsoft NET Middleware software used to broker communication between other forms

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/cloud-services/ (2016-02-06)
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  • Emerging Technology & IT's Role as an Enabler
    Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler video PDF version Djamel Djemaoun Hamidson Eng BSc Ph D is an IT Software Enterprise Architect at CBC Radio Canada since February 2009 with over twenty five years of relevant software technology and management experience During his career he has participated in major projects in a variety of sectors administration banking insurance high technology etc He is business focused user concerns conscious and result driven Synopsis The challenges introduced by the flood of emerging technologies which increasingly follow the pace dictated by the consumer market a process known as Information Technology IT Consumerisation 1 are prompting IT organisations to take a more proactive approach towards managing the diversity of devices and technology This new technology is very often mobile and as such it promises empowerment to its users and demands a much higher rate of agility from IT within the context of its operations and management The intersecting point between technology the workforce standards policies and support is where the road towards that agility begins The traditional use only what I support paradigm is creating a perception amongst these newly empowered consumers that IT doesn t get it whereas the modern reality is that IT does get it To help meet this challenge head on CBC Radio Canada s IT Department along with other Technology group members of CBC Radio Canada s Technology Strategy Board TSB 2 have rolled out a number of initiatives to address this new wave and give employees more flexibility to work from a variety of locations with a range of end point devices in a seamless consistent and secure manner Context Analysis Since 2010 we have been seeing a new technology revolution take place within the enterprise mainly the consumerisation of IT movement which comes with new challenges of its own This revolution movement challenges the traditional approaches towards computing solutions implemented ten to fifteen years ago within Information Technology Nowadays the boundaries between work and personal technologies are blurring and employees expect the technologies that they rely upon in their personal lives devices browsers applications from different App Stores and Marketplaces etc to be available to them in their business lives and vice versa According to Unisys 3 IDC 4 research the typical consumer information worker uses four devices desktop laptop smartphone and tablet Any consumer has the ability to walk into a major consumer electronics retailer purchase a wireless N router for their home entertainment network for fifty dollars and install it within twenty minutes And they do it They buy electronics for themselves their kids and their friends More consumers than ever are purchasing computers that outperform those that they have at work and according to Forrester Research 5 consumers are connecting them to the enterprise as fast as they can buy them regardless of the policies in place After all why are employees investing their own money in devices to use at work Part of the answer is provided by the user experiences of these devices people like their tablets one might even go so far as to say that they really love them Given that people like using these devices at home it stands to reason that they would want to use them at work as well This movement seems to have pushed the employee into driving seat when it comes to devices According to the Aberdeen Group 6 96 of businesses have a least one iPad in use and SAP AG 7 now has over three thousand corporate owned iPhones and fourteen thousand iPads This initiative is not just coming from employees At the very highest levels executives are pushing to spur the Bring Your Own Device BYOD culture along 50 of CIOs will purchase tablets for employees in 2012 according to Morgan Stanley 8 Workers want to have more influence on the choice of technology that they use to get the job done Industry experts have coined a term for this phenomenon the consumerisation of IT The key drivers behind this growing trend include More choice end users have more access to smarter cheaper devices social networking sites and Cloud services Enabling technologies wireless networks Cloud services virtualisation powerful and intuitive devices and the like are enabling if not fuelling this trend Work life blur work styles have evolved to a point where the lines between work and life have blurred Users want technology that is consistent across the office home divide User expectations ultimately user expectations have increased they expect technology at work to be as good as their technology at home Why should we care about consumerisation Gartner Inc 9 refers to consumerisation as the single most influential trend affecting the technology sector in the coming decade People

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/emerging-technology-it-s-role-as-an-enabler/ (2016-02-06)
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  • Local Coverage - The Digital Advantage
    Valuation 2 3 28 Independent Contracts 2 3 29 Management of Investments 2 3 30 Fleet Management 2 3 31 Property and Casualty Insurance 2 3 32 Risk Management Real Estate 2 11 1 Parking 2 11 2 Construction and Tenant Alteration 2 11 3 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Tenant 2 11 4 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Landlord Policy on Business Continuity Program Policy on Employee Related Expenses and Reimbursements Policy on Accounting and Financial Reporting Policy on the CBC Radio Canada Pension Plan Funding Policy on Leave Policy on Learning Development and Performance Corporate By Laws Terms of use CBC Digital Services Transparency and Accountability Access to Information Documents released in answer to ATI requests of general interest Agendas Audits Board of Directors Meetings Expenses External Legal Fees Miscellaneous Policies Retreats Requests How to submit an ATI request Transparency and Accountability Bulletin Proactive Disclosure Business travel and hospitality expenses Board of Directors Meeting Court Judgements External information sources Privacy Reports Infosource Annual Public Meeting 2015 Edition 2014 Edition Speeches Video Archives 2013 Edition Speakers Questions and Answers Additional Resources Video Archives 2012 Edition Speakers Question and answers Additional resources Video Archives 2011 Edition 2010 Edition 2009 Edition Reports and Plans Environmental Performance Report Environmental Performance Report 2011 2012 President s Message Stewardship Responsibility Environmental Scorecard Impact and Reporting Prevention Training and Engagement Awards and Distinctions Environmental Performance Report 2012 2013 President s Message Environmental Scorecard Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2013 2014 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2014 2015 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Environmental Lead Team Corporate Plan Summary Financial Reports Quarterly Reports Annual Report Archives Quarterly Report Archives Supplementary Data on Budget 2012 Implementation Pension Plan Submissions CRTC Submissions LPIF Annual Report Auditor General s Reports Equity Reports Official Languages Reports and Plans Value far Beyond the Broadcast Measuring our Performance Official Languages Employment Equity Technology Standards SYNC online technology magazine SYNC Issue 1 2012 Note from Paul Jané Note from Dany Harrison Cloud Services Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler Local Coverage The Digital Advantage The Not So Black Art of Search Engine Optimisation Next Generation Converged Network NGCN Analogue Television Shutdown The End of an Era for CBC Radio Canada SYNC Issue 2 2012 Radio Broadcast Data System Print Optimisation Program Business Intelligence Adaptive Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/local-coverage-the-digital-advantage/ (2016-02-06)
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  • The "Not So Black Art" of Search Engine Optimisation
    Dave Hamel is the Product Manager for Web Analytics SEO and the Google Search Engine here at CBC Radio Canada and he has been working on the Web for over fifteen years He has worked on sites for clients such as Citibank Rolex and Thankyou Network Dave is an avid cyclist and a member of the Lapdogs cycling club There was a time when if you wanted to look something up you needed to go to a library or resort to a dusty collection of encyclopaedias to check a fact The Internet changed that by literally placing information at our fingertips The Internet had a problem though with such vast amounts of information available how could it make that information searchable In the early days there were directories such as Yahoo Excite and DMOZ similar to the yellow pages in the phonebook where websites would be analysed and categorised but marketers soon learned to game these directories for more traffic which caused the value and relevancy of these tools to decline Then along came Google and everything changed Having performed over 65 of English language searches Source comScore qSearch February 2011 rather than relying on websites to tell the search engine where they belonged Google changed the game by telling the websites where they belonged instead This process became known as organic natural or algorithmic search This changed the way in which information was collected and left many people to ask such questions as How does Google decide which site is number one Why is my website not showing up How do I improve my position in the search results Luckily Google itself provides the answer and it is a process called Search Engine Optimization SEO is the practice of changing a website to improve its position on the search results page This is not strictly an IT practice either it could involve coding but it might consist of changing the copy or title improving the user experience by changing the hierarchy or improving the website s marketing and PR If you touch a website at all SEO is your concern and it boils down to one simple thing The best SEO is to make your content worth sharing How do you know what the best restaurant in town is Why did you take your car to be fixed at that garage Why did you go see that Indie film instead of the Hollywood one Chances are that your decision was made partly because someone told you about it SEO can be thought of as word of mouth for the Internet and it matters because there are over 270 million unique websites over two billion people on the Internet and Google alone performs over a billion searches a day As such you have to ask yourself how anyone is going to find your site SEO also matters because top search results receive 40 of the clicks from users second search results receive 10 third search results receive only 8 5 and the percentage of clicks declines quickly from that point onward which means that if you are not on the first page of results chances are that no one is finding you However search has a massive long tail Over 70 of searches are for words searched five times or less per month This means that you do not need to be number one for generic searches to be successful For example you might not be able to get to the top spot for beans but you might manage to get the top spot for Peruvian lima beans The question then becomes How does it work Google sends out a spider or a bot which crawls the Internet and collects information This information is then indexed and an algorithm is applied to determine the importance of the page The algorithm takes a number of things into account when assigning a pagerank named after Google founder Larry Page Pagerank is the numeric representation of the perceived value of a Web page in relation to the Internet and it is made up of a number of different elements These include The authority of the host domain The link popularity of a page The anchor text of the external links On page keyword usage Registration and hosting data Traffic and click through rate and Social media metrics Domain authority is easy explained as how trustworthy or relevant a site is when compared to other sites Essentially what is the perceived importance for end users For example who are you going to trust more www apple com or www win ipad gamble tv The Internet has already decided and applied more importance to the Apple domain However domain authority is complex and there are over 150 different elements used to calculate this value so it is very difficult to influence directly Link popularity is simply how many links are there to a specific page Think about it this way each link is a vote for a webpage the more links the more votes This is combined with the anchor text of these links Ontario government doesn t know if smart meters are working is pretty descriptive link text You can tell what the content will be if you click on this link Something like click here is not descriptive at all and could be a link to anything As a result Google will apply more weight to the first link If you have a variety of links that all have similar text then Google assigns more credibility to that landing page Therefore using the previous example if there is another link that reads Smart meters broken claims Ontario government the Google algorithm will recognise that page as being an authority on the subject of smart meters and the Ontario government It does this by following the link to its destination and reading the content of the page Specifically it looks at the title tag which is used as the text in bookmarks the tab

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/the-not-so-black-art-of-search-engine-optimisation/ (2016-02-06)
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  • Next Generation Converged Network (NGCN)
    model for broadcasting which means that its regional stations contribute content to a central location Toronto for English Services and Montreal for French Services Regional content is assembled along with national content and returned to the regions so that it can all be sent to the local transmitter for broadcasting On the business side corporate data occupies an important place in CBC Radio Canada s day to day operations This includes email service Internet access FTP file transfers and SAP amongst others An appropriate method of transportation was chosen depending on the nature of the content this could be Asynchronous Serial Interface ASI analogue or Standard Definition SD Serial Digital Interface SDI circuits for video exchange locally or between cities or satellite service for national contribution or collection Integrated Services Digital Network ISDN and analogue audio circuits were used for radio distribution and collection Telus provided a Multiprotocol Label Switching MPLS network for the corporate data and some FTP file transfers CBC Radio Canada has relied on national and local carriers to provide services for media and data exchange between CBC Radio Canada sites including local loops With long term contractual agreements coming to an end the Corporation wanted to explore the possibility of using a single network to carry audio video corporate data and FTP file transfers as well as answer any future needs such as teleconferencing IP telephony and remote productions for special events Following this requirement the Next Generation Converged Network NGCN was born This network offers flexibility and scalability and it ensures efficient use of available bandwidth The NGCN currently provides connections between forty CBC Radio Canada sites as well as eight data only sites five of which are airports and the other three are Pippy Place SSO Carling and the Network Alarm Centre NAC As services expand and new stations are built the NGCN will cover those services whenever possible Remote regions remain a challenge and will continue to be serviced by satellite and other alternative means accordingly Context Network Implementation CBC Radio Canada s broadcast model is one of collection or contribution followed by distribution To better understand the network implementation part of the NGCN let s first take a look at how the old model worked On the collection side content was sent from regional stations or remote locations through terrestrial and satellite real time networks to the Toronto Broadcast Centre TBC and or la Maison de Radio Canada MRC as seen in figures 1 and 2 Figure 1 Satellite Collection Network Figure 2 Satellite and Terrestrial Collection Network On the distribution side televised content from the TBC and MRC was sent by satellite to regional stations to reach the off air transmitter through a Studio Transmitter Link STL and distributed to cable and satellite providers as well as isolated transmission sites as shown in figure 3 Figure 3 Satellite Distribution Network When dealing with radio content collection and distribution was done mainly through land based networks An example of the 1P English Radio collection network is shown in figure 4 Figure 4 1P English Radio One Switched Broadcast Collection Network Each location could receive content and insert content into the network this service was provided by Bell On the data side the MPLS Cloud served as the corporate data network and was also used for some FTP file transfers and Internet access services Figure 5 Data Network The NGCN was designed to replace the satellite collection infrastructure and part of distribution network with the goal of freeing up transponders 9A and 12A on the Anik F1 satellite It also replaces the radio collection network The new network is composed mostly of a fibre optic network and in regions where fibre with Synchronous Optical NETwork SONET service is not yet available Ethernet Private Line EPL is used The NGCN also replaces the MPLS Cloud for data services Multiple services converge onto a single network connecting CBC Radio Canada sites across the country as well as London in the UK and Washington D C in the USA Figure 6 shows the configuration of the NGCN for current and future CBC Radio Canada sites The sites are categorised as core branch TV radio radio only and data only sites which include airports for the distribution of CBC News Express Figure 6 NGCN Network The yellow boxes represent the thirteen core sites to which branch sites and all other types of sites connect The core sites are meshed to allow data to flow through an alternate path in case of failure of the most direct path The core sites also have protection in the form of diverse routing of a working and alternate path as well as a diverse entrance of the protected fibre into the site building This type of protection was also implemented at other non core sites whenever possible and cost effective Refer to the legend in figure 6 for the type of protection as well as the bandwidth for every link Another detail to point out from figure 6 is the grey boxes around the Toronto and Montreal nodes They show that both these sites have the equivalent of two nodes per site The second node is located in a second Central Equipment Room CER in each location and it belongs to a completely redundant architecture from the one in the first CER Other sites also have redundancy however main and redundant architecture are located in the same CER room in those cases This additional spatial redundancy was added to Toronto and Montreal for disaster recovery purposes given that they are the network heads for English and French Services respectively The network provider is Rogers and its fibre network adheres to the SONET standard The EPL segments are IP type networks over fibre or copper The protected OC 192 links between Montreal Toronto Ottawa and Quebec City are fully redundant links meaning that a copy of the data flows through both working and alternate paths of the links simultaneously All other protected

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-1-2012/next-generation-converged-network-ngcn/ (2016-02-06)
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