archive-ca.com » CA » R » RADIO-CANADA.CA

Total: 1529

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Radio Centralisation
    s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Radio Centralisation Michel Leduc is the Manager Media Engineering within CBC Radio Canada s French Productions group He joined CBC Radio Canada in 1988 as a Project Manager in the Engineering Group EHQ He has worked on many radio and TV projects such as Studio 71 72 and 76 TV audio post production update the Avid post production suites and Studio 14 16 radio audio post production in Montreal as well as many radio and TV studios in the Toronto Broadcast Centre the RCI project etc He was promoted to Manager in September 2001 Since then he has been responsible for most of the radio and TV post production projects for the French network including projects like Radio Centralisation Sanjeev Kharbanda is the Manager Media Engineering within CBC Radio Canada s Media Operations Technology group in Toronto He is responsible for the implementation of Radio TV and Digital projects within the English Services He has been employed with CBC Radio Canada since 1988 and has worked on many projects including Radio Centralisation the DaletPlus Avid rollout Radio studios and the like Philippe Aubé P Eng MBA began his career with CBC Radio Canada in 1999 as a Technical Supervisor Transmission Operations for the Maritime Provinces In 2005 Philippe moved to Halifax and became Project Engineer Atlantic region for CBC Radio Canada s Transmission Engineering division Since 2009 Philippe has been working out of Montreal as Senior Manager for the Transmission Engineering division Philippe is a graduate of the University of Moncton NB in Electrical Engineering 1999 and also has a Master of Business Administration degree from Saint Mary s University Halifax NS 2008 Jean Marc Gellatly is the Director French Services Media Presentation within CBC Radio Canada s French Productions group He is responsible for content delivery to French speaking audiences across Canada Jean Marc and his team are currently completing the consolidation of all MCR activities and technology Radio TV and Digital into a single integrated Media Presentation Centre located in Montreal A broadcast professional with over twenty five years of operations experience he joined CBC Radio Canada in 2005 Scott Stewardson is the Director English Services Media Presentation within CBC Radio Canada s Media Operations Technology group in Toronto He is responsible for the integrated and centralised Radio TV and Digital Media Presentation Centre located in the Toronto Broadcast Centre Over the past two years Scott and his team have implemented technology and workflows that allow for the delivery of content to Canadian audiences when and how they want to see and hear it Scott s background also includes leadership opportunities in TV and Radio Production Engineering Technological Maintenance and he was formerly the Plant Manager at CBC Vancouver Introduction Prior to May 31 2011 CBC Radio Canada s Radio presentation relied on program origination within the network centres Toronto and Montreal supported by numerous regional presentation centres each with its own automation system Radio distribution to feed the presentation signal to hundreds of CBC Radio Canada owned transmitters was based on an expensive complex network of satellite and terrestrial circuits leased from common carriers These terrestrial contracts were expiring in 2011 and as most of the terrestrial carrier infrastructure was reaching the end of its life unreliable and required substantial capital investment by the carriers it was expected that either the carriers would not renew some portions of the terrestrial contracts or they would charge higher amounts to operate these networks Additionally CBC Radio Canada started distributing content using newer channels such as live Web streams that required all regional content to be back hauled to Toronto for centralised distribution to Content Delivery Networks CDNs In the case of English Radio this was accomplished by deploying low cost MP3 encoders Barix in the regions to encode regional programming to MP3 and send that programming to a pair of redundant IceCasts servers in Toronto prior to forwarding them to the Abacast CDN for Web streaming Figure 1 Old vs New Presentation Topology Therefore a study was commissioned to carry out a cost benefit analysis of continuing with decentralised presentation versus reconfiguring our Radio presentation systems to take advantage of Centralised Presentation and satellite distribution similar to what was done for Television in 2001 The cost benefit analysis clearly indicated that due to the extensive capital investment that would be required in the regions to modernise the Presentation infrastructure plus the anticipated increase in terrestrial contract costs it was preferable to proceed with a Centralised Presentation with satellite distribution Based on the results of this study both English French Radio Networks agreed to proceed with centralcasting projects Centralisation Concept CBC Radio Canada s Centralisation model consists of gathering the regional live content and transferring the pre packaged program files to Network Presentation Centres in Toronto Montreal using our Next Generation Converged Network NGCN These Network Presentation Centres integrate programming so that it can be uplinked to satellite and distributed directly to transmitters In the interest of facilitating things in case of disaster recovery it was agreed that the signal would be downlinked to

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-2-2012/radio-centralisation/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive


  • SYNC Editorial
    Unacceptable Advertising 1 3 12 Contests and Games of Chance 1 3 13 Alcoholic Beverage Advertising 1 3 14 Access to Advertiser Property 1 3 15 Advertising Limits 1 3 16 Provincial Regulations Public Service Announcements 1 4 Public Service Announcements Free Time Political Broadcasts Official Languages Reports and Plans Corporate Policies Legal Services 2 4 1 Legal Services 2 4 2 Legal Proceedings Corporate Secreteriat 2 9 1 Records and Information Management 2 9 2 Personal Information and Privacy Protection 2 9 3 Delegation of Signing Authority 2 9 4 Disclosure of Wrongdoings Whistleblower Policy 2 9 5 Access to Information Privacy Protection Privacy Standards 2 9 6 Email Management 2 9 7 Information Classification Policy Communications 2 1 1 Communications Information Technology 2 5 1 Use of Technology Assets Human Resources 2 2 1 Staffing 2 2 2 Employment Equity 2 2 3 Conflict of Interest and Ethics 2 2 4 Compensation 2 2 10 Discipline 2 2 11 Appeal Procedures 2 2 13 Relocation 2 2 14 Official Languages 2 2 15 Anti Discrimination and Harassment 2 2 16 Occupational Health Safety and Environment 2 2 17 Political Activity 2 2 19 Industrial Relations 2 2 20 Non Discrimination and the Duty to Accommodate 2 2 21 Code of Conduct 2 2 22 Prevention of Work Place Violence Finance and Administration 2 3 2 Assets 2 3 3 Capital Leases 2 3 4 Cash Funds 2 3 5 Cheque Control 2 3 6 Procurement 2 3 7 Credit and Collections 2 3 8 Delegation of Financial Authorities 2 3 11 Fraud and Theft 2 3 14 Improvements to Leased Property 2 3 15 Full Program Costing Labour and Facilities Cost Rates 2 3 17 Management of Foreign Currency Risk 2 3 18 Payment of Sales Commissions 2 3 20 Reciprocal Trade Contra 2 3 21 Revenue Recording and Reporting 2 3 22 Shared Use of Transmitter Sites and Facilities 2 3 24 TV Program Inventories Recording and Valuation 2 3 28 Independent Contracts 2 3 29 Management of Investments 2 3 30 Fleet Management 2 3 31 Property and Casualty Insurance 2 3 32 Risk Management Real Estate 2 11 1 Parking 2 11 2 Construction and Tenant Alteration 2 11 3 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Tenant 2 11 4 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Landlord Policy on Business Continuity Program Policy on Employee Related Expenses and Reimbursements Policy on Accounting and Financial Reporting Policy on the CBC Radio Canada Pension Plan Funding Policy on Leave Policy on Learning Development and Performance Corporate By Laws Terms of use CBC Digital Services Transparency and Accountability Access to Information Documents released in answer to ATI requests of general interest Agendas Audits Board of Directors Meetings Expenses External Legal Fees Miscellaneous Policies Retreats Requests How to submit an ATI request Transparency and Accountability Bulletin Proactive Disclosure Business travel and hospitality expenses Board of Directors Meeting Court Judgements External information sources Privacy

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-2-2012/sync-editorial/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mobile Digital Television (ATSC M/H) – Field-testing & Measurements
    Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Environmental Lead Team Corporate Plan Summary Financial Reports Quarterly Reports Annual Report Archives Quarterly Report Archives Supplementary Data on Budget 2012 Implementation Pension Plan Submissions CRTC Submissions LPIF Annual Report Auditor General s Reports Equity Reports Official Languages Reports and Plans Value far Beyond the Broadcast Measuring our Performance Official Languages Employment Equity Technology Standards SYNC online technology magazine SYNC Issue 1 2012 Note from Paul Jané Note from Dany Harrison Cloud Services Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler Local Coverage The Digital Advantage The Not So Black Art of Search Engine Optimisation Next Generation Converged Network NGCN Analogue Television Shutdown The End of an Era for CBC Radio Canada SYNC Issue 2 2012 Radio Broadcast Data System Print Optimisation Program Business Intelligence Adaptive Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Article Contributors Philippe Aubé Senior Manager Transmission Engineering division Mobile Digital Television DTV is a technology that allows small portable devices such as smartphones tablets and automobile based displays to receive digital television signals over the air In North America the standard adopted for mobile DTV is ATSC M H where M H stands for Mobile Handheld and it is compatible with the existing DTV broadcast standards and infrastructure One or more mobile DTV services can be added to an existing DTV channel by allocating a certain amount of the main programme s bandwidth to the new mobile services Figure 1 Examples of Mobile DTV Receivers In other words this new technology uses radio waves reserved for digital television broadcasters rather than those that have been allocated to cellular telephones Unlike typical streaming services mobile DTV will allow viewers to watch local and national programming live without using a single bit of your cell phone data plan Figure 1 shows an example of an iPad and an iPod touch using a dongle i to receive a mobile DTV signal as well as a Samsung Galaxy S Lightray 4G smartphone ii with an integrated mobile DTV receiver Field testing Measurements Field testing and measurements were done in order to assess the potential of this technology in terms of coverage and robustness Mobile DTV transmission equipment was installed on the CBLFT DT DTV transmitter at the CN Tower in Toronto and on the CBMT DT DTV transmitter in Montreal for the duration of the trials Although field testing was done in both cities more in depth measurements and analysis were made in Toronto hence why it is the focus of this article The full report can be found here Specifically the objectives of the field testing and measurements were to Assess the impact of various forward error correction FEC configurations on the coverage Identify the best parameters for realistic prediction algorithms used with our software prediction tools for mobile DTV coverage analysis Recommend optimal FEC configurations that meet CBC Radio Canada s requirements for future installations Gain expertise with this new technology Hardware Requirements There are three additional hardware components required to broadcast mobile DTV from an existing DTV installation an MPEG 4 encoder that encodes and compresses the signal into the correct standard video H 264 baseline profile 416x240 resolution HE AAC v2 audio an ATSC M H multiplexer that will incorporate the ATSC M H signal into the main ATSC stream and finally an ATSC M H compatible exciter for post processing and modulation purposes Figure 2 shows a basic ATSC M H block diagram Yellow blocks represent the existing DTV hardware and green blocks represent the ATSC M H hardware The corresponding devices are shown for Toronto s setup from manufacturer Rohde and Schwartz as well as Montreal s from manufacturer Harris Figure 2 Mobile DTV Block Diagram Toronto Montreal Other equipment that is not related to the ATSC standard can be used to add features such as weather data financial data news feeds advertising content traffic information and various other types of metadata Figure 3 shows a screenshot of the mobile DTV signal in Montreal with some of these additional metadata features The screen layout is customisable and can be modified to meet the broadcaster s requirements Figure 3 Mobile DTV Screenshot Showing Metadata Features Montreal Mobile DTV Service Shown Signal Robustness Signal robustness is key for mobile DTV In order to achieve the required robustness for mobile reception two forward error correction FEC methods have been implemented in the ATSC M H standard the Reed Solomon Cyclic Redundancy Check RS CRC at the packet layer and the Serial Concatenated Convolutional Coder SCCC at the physical layer Various FEC configurations are obtained by changing the parameters of these FEC methods and they each have an impact on the robustness and bandwidth of the

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-3-2013/mobile-digital-television/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive



  • Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception
    Currency Risk 2 3 18 Payment of Sales Commissions 2 3 20 Reciprocal Trade Contra 2 3 21 Revenue Recording and Reporting 2 3 22 Shared Use of Transmitter Sites and Facilities 2 3 24 TV Program Inventories Recording and Valuation 2 3 28 Independent Contracts 2 3 29 Management of Investments 2 3 30 Fleet Management 2 3 31 Property and Casualty Insurance 2 3 32 Risk Management Real Estate 2 11 1 Parking 2 11 2 Construction and Tenant Alteration 2 11 3 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Tenant 2 11 4 Lease of Space Where CBC Radio Canada is the Landlord Policy on Business Continuity Program Policy on Employee Related Expenses and Reimbursements Policy on Accounting and Financial Reporting Policy on the CBC Radio Canada Pension Plan Funding Policy on Leave Policy on Learning Development and Performance Corporate By Laws Terms of use CBC Digital Services Transparency and Accountability Access to Information Documents released in answer to ATI requests of general interest Agendas Audits Board of Directors Meetings Expenses External Legal Fees Miscellaneous Policies Retreats Requests How to submit an ATI request Transparency and Accountability Bulletin Proactive Disclosure Business travel and hospitality expenses Board of Directors Meeting Court Judgements External information sources Privacy Reports Infosource Annual Public Meeting 2015 Edition 2014 Edition Speeches Video Archives 2013 Edition Speakers Questions and Answers Additional Resources Video Archives 2012 Edition Speakers Question and answers Additional resources Video Archives 2011 Edition 2010 Edition 2009 Edition Reports and Plans Environmental Performance Report Environmental Performance Report 2011 2012 President s Message Stewardship Responsibility Environmental Scorecard Impact and Reporting Prevention Training and Engagement Awards and Distinctions Environmental Performance Report 2012 2013 President s Message Environmental Scorecard Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2013 2014 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2014 2015 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Environmental Lead Team Corporate Plan Summary Financial Reports Quarterly Reports Annual Report Archives Quarterly Report Archives Supplementary Data on Budget 2012 Implementation Pension Plan Submissions CRTC Submissions LPIF Annual Report Auditor General s Reports Equity Reports Official Languages Reports and Plans Value far Beyond the Broadcast Measuring our Performance Official Languages Employment Equity Technology Standards SYNC online technology magazine SYNC Issue 1 2012 Note from Paul Jané Note from Dany Harrison Cloud Services Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler Local Coverage The Digital Advantage The Not So Black Art of Search Engine Optimisation Next Generation Converged Network NGCN Analogue Television Shutdown The End of an Era for CBC Radio Canada SYNC Issue 2 2012 Radio Broadcast Data System Print Optimisation Program Business Intelligence Adaptive Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception Article Contributors Guy Bouchard Senior Manager for New Broadcast Technologies The purpose of this article is to demystify Digital Television DTV reception considerations As it is intended for a general audience it is written in non technical language and uses analogies familiar to everyone Mind you there will be a bit of arithmetic to illustrate certain phenomena but nothing that requires you to go back to school Since July 2012 Canadians in several major cities have had access to an over the air digital television service This transition has brought about a few changes in frequency and service contours Add to that the fact that the virtual channel system digital television has replaced the physical channel system analogue television which helps feed into the public s confusion about the service Same Old Physics New Challenges Exterior Reception Digital television uses the same electromagnetic waves as analogue radio and television These waves obey certain unchanging laws Electromagnetic waves weaken according to the distance between the transmitter and the receiver Attenuation phenomenon An ambitious graffiti artist wants to cover the Earth in spray paint What surface will he cover at a distance of X from the Earth We could use the model of a can of spray paint as an isotropic paint source a fancy way of saying that the device sprays equally in all directions As such we are talking about a sphere the surface of a sphere at a distance of R being 4 R2 But the spray paint nozzle covers only a part of the sphere Therefore we have to add a multiplying factor proportional to the ratio between the surface covered by the nozzle and the total surface of the sphere This ratio is called the broadcast gain The same phenomenon applies to receiver antennas with the same terminology The intensity of an electromagnetic wave at a distance R from the transmission antenna is proportional to a factor Gain 4 R2 Fact number

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-3-2013/technical-digital-television-reception/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive

  • From Email to Collaboration
    general interest Agendas Audits Board of Directors Meetings Expenses External Legal Fees Miscellaneous Policies Retreats Requests How to submit an ATI request Transparency and Accountability Bulletin Proactive Disclosure Business travel and hospitality expenses Board of Directors Meeting Court Judgements External information sources Privacy Reports Infosource Annual Public Meeting 2015 Edition 2014 Edition Speeches Video Archives 2013 Edition Speakers Questions and Answers Additional Resources Video Archives 2012 Edition Speakers Question and answers Additional resources Video Archives 2011 Edition 2010 Edition 2009 Edition Reports and Plans Environmental Performance Report Environmental Performance Report 2011 2012 President s Message Stewardship Responsibility Environmental Scorecard Impact and Reporting Prevention Training and Engagement Awards and Distinctions Environmental Performance Report 2012 2013 President s Message Environmental Scorecard Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2013 2014 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2014 2015 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Environmental Lead Team Corporate Plan Summary Financial Reports Quarterly Reports Annual Report Archives Quarterly Report Archives Supplementary Data on Budget 2012 Implementation Pension Plan Submissions CRTC Submissions LPIF Annual Report Auditor General s Reports Equity Reports Official Languages Reports and Plans Value far Beyond the Broadcast Measuring our Performance Official Languages Employment Equity Technology Standards SYNC online technology magazine SYNC Issue 1 2012 Note from Paul Jané Note from Dany Harrison Cloud Services Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler Local Coverage The Digital Advantage The Not So Black Art of Search Engine Optimisation Next Generation Converged Network NGCN Analogue Television Shutdown The End of an Era for CBC Radio Canada SYNC Issue 2 2012 Radio Broadcast Data System Print Optimisation Program Business Intelligence Adaptive Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email From Email to Collaboration Article Contributors Jean Martin Thibault IT Software Enterprise Architect Samir Youssef Director of IT Project Delivery and Risk Management CBC Radio Canada recently chose Google as its email service provider 1 Migration to the Google Apps platform which includes Gmail will be carried out in the first quarter of 2013 This new Cloud based platform will provide CBC Radio Canada users with a suite of integrated collaborative tools This solution was chosen through a rigorous selection process that started with a call for tenders The decision was based on the needs and characteristics of the Corporation and a set of very precise selection criteria A Brief History of Email Email in one form or another has been around almost as long as computer networks and long predates the arrival of the Internet In 1961 researchers at MIT invented one of the first multi user systems called CTSS 2 By 1965 CTSS had hundreds of users and a messaging system was created to allow them to communicate with one another When the researchers floated the idea of electronic letters the heads at MIT were somewhat reluctant since they felt it would result in a waste of what were then expensive resources It was in the early 1980s that one of the first communications protocols for modern email was introduced the SMTP Simple Message Transfer Protocol Finalised as a standard in 1982 in RFC 821 3 of the IETF this protocol is still in use today 30 years after its creation Today messaging systems not only include email but also a variety of indispensable functions such as contacts mailing lists and a calendar which allows users to plan activities and meetings and has become an integral part of the corporate toolbox Together these tools form a limited but essential collaborative platform Consumerisation of Information Technologies In their first decades of existence messaging systems were only available in the workplace since they were expensive and complicated to implement During the 1990s thanks in part to the arrival of the Internet these technologies were democratised becoming accessible to all Technological advances in the past two decades notably in Cloud computing have been influenced by the consumer market not the business sector This phenomenon is commonly referred to as consumerisation for more information see the Emerging Technology and IT s role as an Enabler 4 article in SYNC Benefits of Cloud Computing Cloud computing is a general concept that has become a hot discussion topic in technological circles For more information check out the Cloud Services 5 article in SYNC IT Expertise The evolution of technology and currently available solutions is forcing companies to decide how to optimise their resources in order to fulfil their mission These decisions are often made by Information Technologies IT departments It would not be economically feasible to assign specialised resources to all of a company s technological areas This is certainly the case at CBC Radio Canada where the necessary expertise must be focused on strategic initiatives aimed at providing a quality product to Canadians Messaging is a widely used service that several providers now offer via Cloud computing Google and others have built up an impressive capability in running this type of service given the huge number of mailboxes they manage They have dedicated enormous resources to this product which is at the core of their business plan An Infrastructure to Support the Entire Planet A Giant Global Infrastructure CBC Radio Canada owns a number of data centres across Canada and a massive infrastructure to support office automation services for approximately 10 000 employees as well as radio television and webcasting services This infrastructure is impressive even for a company of this size see for example the SYNC article describing our Next Generation Converged Network NGCN 6 However all of this hardware is nothing compared to that of companies like Google which until recently had kept its technological environment a closely guarded secret In 2012 however the company decided to give the public an inside look at its operations 7 Figure 1 Google Datacenters 8 Part of CBC Radio Canada s mission is to conserve our Canadian heritage To do so we need to constantly invest in and increase our resources Given the significant costs involved we are better off focusing our energies on media rather than messaging Examples of such costs include storage space remote backups for disaster recovery electricity to keep everything running and equipment upgrades every three to seven years Cloud computing companies have the same challenges but to minimise their operating costs and reduce security risks that would affect all of their customers they have developed data centres using innovative techniques that are not readily available to the majority of companies While very costly on a small scale these techniques become highly profitable on an extremely wide scale For example Google develops many custom products for its data centres computers routers electric relays etc This allows the company to optimise space and control energy efficiency and other similar parameters 9 Google frequently uses water instead of air to regulate the temperature in its data centres It is more expensive to install pipes rather than air ducts but the energy savings make this a cost effective compromise 10 These choices make Google s huge data centres more environmentally friendly than smaller centres considering the amount of data they process By using the services of a Cloud computing company CBC Radio Canada will be able to take advantage of all of these technological advances as well as an economy of scale that would otherwise be out of reach Maintenance A lot of planning and effort go into the maintenance and upgrading of a heavily used application like email Interrupting the messaging service at a communications company like CBC Radio Canada is more than just an inconvenience With complex planning costly infrastructure and an army of engineers it is possible to ensure that there will never be service interruptions during equipment or software upgrades However even for an organisation like CBC Radio Canada this is sometimes an unrealistic scenario Cloud service providers are faced with exactly the same challenges in these kinds of situations and have similar solutions at their disposal Because of the size of their operations however they are able to achieve economies of scale It is also inconceivable for them to interrupt services to all of their customers For example a breakdown or service interruption at Google causes problems to several hundred million users The company therefore has to take all the necessary precautions to ensure that this situation never occurs From the customer s perspective software and server upgrades are a non event All who use the Cloud messaging service regularly benefit from security fixes anti virus upgrades improved performance and technological advances in a totally seamless manner This is one of the major benefits of making the switch to Cloud based messaging Scalability Security The scalability of a computer system refers to its capacity to expand and handle an increased workload e g a higher number of users or the ease with which resources can be added without service interruptions This capacity can be assessed by comparing the system s performance before and after the workload increase For example scalability can be evaluated according to the following two criteria the capacity to add 1 of additional users on a permanent basis or the capacity to double i e to increase by 100 the number of additional users for a short period Scalability can also be measured according to the downtime required to add resources A system is very scalable if there is no downtime and the performance remains unchanged after the workload increase Cloud service providers must offer highly scalable systems because of the number of users they support and the fact that workload increases can occur at any time The public s interest in a given service is often difficult to predict and providers must be able to adjust to a rapid spike in demand Over the years these companies have developed scalable and expandable infrastructures In the first six months of 2012 for instance the number of active Gmail users rose from 350 million 11 to 425 million 12 Figure 2 Number of Active Gmail Users From this perspective adding a few thousand CBC Radio Canada users will be a very simple operation for Google s infrastructure The same goes for disaster recovery and business continuity plans which set out the procedures and policies to follow in order to resume or ideally continue regular activities 13 Google owns data centres across the globe and has a single recovery plan for all of its customers In fact most Cloud service providers guarantee the availability of their systems and have integrated continuity processes to ensure that data remain available even if one of their data centres is affected by network or hardware failures Costs A regular software installation in one of our data centres requires cost planning for the entire project There are initial equipment costs such as wiring and computers software licence costs normally for the first year installation costs and so on Then there are recurring costs electricity labour licence renewals and equipment replacements every few years The Cloud computing model is a service rental model as opposed to an upfront purchase model The initial costs are practically nil and recurring costs depend on resources used In the case of email we will pay according to the number of mailboxes we use An analogy may be drawn with transportation according to the traditional model you purchase a car a high initial outlay pay for gas follow the manufacturer s maintenance plan and put money aside to buy your next car Cloud computing in this analogy would be the equivalent of public transit in a luxury bus where passengers have their own private roomettes Users share the operating costs but only according to the distance they travel More than just Email Over time most Cloud service providers have added several other functions to their basic email service A wide range of advanced collaboration and communication tools now complement the traditional email and calendar These collaboration and communication tools are not new to the business sector However they were very complex to implement configure and manage and still are to a degree and the cost was prohibitive for most companies When available such tools tended to be used by only a subset of employees Like many other Cloud based applications these types of tools have become more accessible in recent years They were initially only rolled out to residential users and were only later made available to companies Google for example launched Gmail in 2004 Google Apps the corporate version of the same product that will be used by CBC Radio Canada was launched in 2007 Going back even further one of the most popular public email sites Hotmail has been around since 1996 Microsoft bought Hotmail in 1997 Revamped Office Automation Tools Standard office automation tools such as word processing software electronic spreadsheets presentation software and vector graphics editors are basically as old as email Today s most popular suite by far is Microsoft Office Word and Excel are the most frequently used applications and are considered the norm in the business world Over the years Microsoft has added multiple functionalities to cater to all users writers graphic designers publicists secretaries professional presenters marketing specialists lawyers etc In short a wide range of people with varied and sometimes very specific needs For most users however these additional functionalities are superfluous Over the years several Cloud service providers have significantly enhanced the tools that come with email and the calendar Rather than trying to compete with Microsoft in terms of editing functionalities these providers have focused on the benefits of Cloud computing i e the network availability of the platform and have added collaborative functionalities In the case of Google the Google Apps suite includes the following office automation tools Docs word processing Sheets an electronic spreadsheet Slides a presentation software and Drawings a vector graphics editor The functionalities of these apps do not compare with their equivalents in Microsoft Office However Google has capitalised on its network computing expertise and its vast computer network to offer advanced collaborative functionalities Each of these apps allows several users to work on the same document at the same time in real time In addition Google has done away with the idea of saving a copy of the file Document changes made by each participant are continually saved on Google s servers and are also copied to other data centres across the globe to ensure even greater security Furthermore all changes are saved in the Cloud and users can access each participant s revision history Figure 3 A Text Document in Google Apps It is worth noting that these functionalities are available on several platforms notably mobile platforms like smartphones and tablet devices This allows for increased collaboration and helps to avoid errors and time consuming file transfers by email Users no longer have to save several copies of the same file make regular backups or complete the often complex task of comparing and merging colleagues copies of the same file As we will see in the next section users can carry out these activities whilst talking to one another with new integrated communications tools such as videoconferencing and instant messaging Advanced Communication In addition to the collaborative tools described in the previous section Google like many other companies offers advanced online communication tools These tools may be used for either asynchronous or real time communication Asynchronous Communication Asynchronous communication tools are like specialised websites where users gather to exchange ideas and collaborate on projects They communicate through shared messages that are available to everyone With asynchronous communication users generally expect messages to be saved for a certain time This allows people to collaborate over a long period which is not always the case with real time communication Discussion groups allow users to rapidly create work groups or Q A lists In these groups people can post comments ask questions or answer other people s questions and even vote for the most interesting message This is the oldest type of collaborative site dating back to the early days of the Internet one of the oldest discussion systems still widely used today is Usenet 14 Google s Groups function allows users to join and participate in Usenet groups and also to create private discussion groups at CBC Radio Canada Figure 4 Google s Groups Function For example a technical support team can create a private discussion group in which users can post questions about minor issues instead of sending an email The advantage of discussion groups in this context is that the issues and corresponding solutions are documented and available for all to see Collaboration sites are small specialised websites that can be rapidly created by anyone without specific Web

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-3-2013/from-email-to-collaboration/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Unified Communications
    General s Reports Equity Reports Official Languages Reports and Plans Value far Beyond the Broadcast Measuring our Performance Official Languages Employment Equity Technology Standards SYNC online technology magazine SYNC Issue 1 2012 Note from Paul Jané Note from Dany Harrison Cloud Services Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler Local Coverage The Digital Advantage The Not So Black Art of Search Engine Optimisation Next Generation Converged Network NGCN Analogue Television Shutdown The End of an Era for CBC Radio Canada SYNC Issue 2 2012 Radio Broadcast Data System Print Optimisation Program Business Intelligence Adaptive Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Unified Communications Article Contributors Jean Pierre Bédard Director Telephony Unified Communications CBC Radio Canada Media Technology Services The purpose of this article is to inform users of the sizeable changes that will be brought to the Corporation through the implementation of Unified Communications UC 1 within CBC Radio Canada over the months to come These changes will be positive in the sense that they will facilitate the ability of employees to communicate freely with each other and react decisively and in a timely fashion to the situations that arise within a very dynamic workplace The concept of UC can be somewhat difficult to understand for people who are encountering it for the first time Essentially within CBC Radio Canada UC has the goal of unifying all communication modes e g voice video instant messaging text messaging etc for any devices regardless of their type desktop phone smartphone tablet PC etc In a practical sense this translates to the addition of a layer between the devices themselves and the back end equipment that they depend on to run such as a variety of different types of servers This added layer unifies all of the diverse devices in use and allows them to communicate with each other by means of a universal communication protocol the Session Initiation Protocol SIP 2 This article will take a close look at the challenge involved Internet Protocol architecture the project s various implementation stages and what the end result will ultimately mean for CBC Radio Canada s employees The Challenge Figure 1 Unifying a Very Diverse Set of Elements As you can probably imagine the idea of unifying such a wide gamut of communication devices and methods does not come without its challenges especially when the scope of the undertaking involves multiple departments within a large organisation Traditionally within CBC Radio Canada telephony and videoconferencing were responsibilities handled by Telecommunications whereas Information Technology IT would handle the email system SAP servers and other large back end equipment therefore the active cooperation of both groups is necessary to carry out the mandate of Unifying Communications Approximately four years ago Media Technology Services MTS took a detailed look into the direction in which communications appeared to be evolving and a determination was reached to develop multiple scenarios that would allow the Corporation to streamline its communications Thanks to this careful analysis and development of a long term vision to simplify communication within our organisation CBC Radio Canada chose to adopt an entirely new communications architecture based on Internet Protocol IP 3 Internet Protocol Architecture Figure 2 IP The Right Tool for the Right Task Internet Protocol is at the basis of the architecture necessary to implement complex functionality within an environment comprising various communication systems Without IP one is essentially left with nothing but the least sophisticated options such as a physical destkop telephone Granted this is not to say that a traditional Private Branch Exchange PBX 4 telephone system is an entirely unsophisticated tool as it technically allows for the implementation of about 700 different functions such as conferences bridges transfers call forwarding and the like however there is no way of marrying video or adding mobile devices to a PBX system and in those rare instances when something truly complex can be undertaken chances are that it will only be able to do so in conjunction with a short list of very specific devices If one were to look at the ensemble of traditional tools available to CBC Radio Canada right now one would see a long list of communication devices covering voice video fax machines desktop telephony tablets smartphones etc Our ultimate goal is regardless of the communication device being used to be able to Communicate with others in any mode of communication available these days whether by email voice video instant message or text message amongst others Be aware of a recipient s presence information 5 in the interest of being able to determine the best way of reaching them at the time especially if they are busy doing something else Managing to do all of this requires an excellent and flexible architecture at the heart of it all

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-3-2013/unified-communications/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Telecom Expense Reporting & Management Systems
    2011 2012 President s Message Stewardship Responsibility Environmental Scorecard Impact and Reporting Prevention Training and Engagement Awards and Distinctions Environmental Performance Report 2012 2013 President s Message Environmental Scorecard Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2013 2014 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and reporting Prevention Environmental Lead Team Environmental Performance Report 2014 2015 President s Message Environmental Scorecard In the Green Spotlight Impact and Reporting Environmental Lead Team Corporate Plan Summary Financial Reports Quarterly Reports Annual Report Archives Quarterly Report Archives Supplementary Data on Budget 2012 Implementation Pension Plan Submissions CRTC Submissions LPIF Annual Report Auditor General s Reports Equity Reports Official Languages Reports and Plans Value far Beyond the Broadcast Measuring our Performance Official Languages Employment Equity Technology Standards SYNC online technology magazine SYNC Issue 1 2012 Note from Paul Jané Note from Dany Harrison Cloud Services Emerging Technology IT s Role as an Enabler Local Coverage The Digital Advantage The Not So Black Art of Search Engine Optimisation Next Generation Converged Network NGCN Analogue Television Shutdown The End of an Era for CBC Radio Canada SYNC Issue 2 2012 Radio Broadcast Data System Print Optimisation Program Business Intelligence Adaptive Bitrate Video Streaming File based Workflow Remote Production Terminal Editorial Dany Harrison Radio Centralisation SYNC Editorial SYNC Issue 3 2013 Mobile Digital Television ATSC M H Field testing Measurements Technical Considerations for Digital Television Reception From Email to Collaboration Unified Communications Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Radio Canada Est du Québec Security in Today s Digital Information Landscape Editorial Fred Mattocks SYNC Editorial Paul Jané SYNC Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems Article Contributors Alie McCormack Senior Systems Designer Jean Pierre Bédard Director Telephony Unified Communications CBC Radio Canada Media Technology Services The Telecom Expense Reporting Management Systems TERMS project is a very expansive undertaking within CBC Radio Canada sponsored by the Technology Strategy Board TSB it is designed to cover the entire lifecycle of all of CBC Radio Canada s mobile devices and consists of the implementation of two separate systems A Telecom Expense Management TEM system and A Mobile Device Management MDM system TERMS itself seeks to provide a transparent answer to a few questions that are vital within any organisation Who is using mobile devices within the Corporation Which mobile devices are these individuals using How are they using them The ability to answer these questions allows us to elucidate the reason why we pay for the services that we have contracted and whether we are making the best use of the funding that the Canadian taxpayer provides to CBC Radio Canada Following a Request for Proposals RFP that was issued about a year ago by the Telecommunications Media Technology Services and Information Technology groups Tangoe 1 proved to be the best solution to the Corporation s needs as it fits in within CBC Radio Canada s move towards Cloud based solutions Tangoe provides its service within a Software as a Service SaaS framework as such no equipment needs to be purchased by the Corporation which will lease Tangoe s service on a per month and per user basis Figure 1 TERMS Challenges Solutions and Benefits Telecom Expense Management One of the key issues encountered prior to our implementation of TERMS is that the Corporation s employees have never known precisely how much the monthly use of their mobile device costs Presently CBC Radio Canada has approximately 9 000 employees and 6 500 mobile devices most of which are registered with Bell Mobility as well as approximately 500 split between Rogers and Telus Seven out of ten Corporation employees have a cellular telephone but there was no transparency as to the costs associated with these devices and consequently little attention was paid to the way in which they were used Costs in the cellular telephone market evolve extremely quickly When we launched an RFP seeking a cellular service provider back in 2008 the rates offered by Bell Mobility were the best ones available at the time however we are presently switching our service to Rogers due to the fact that Rogers offers more competitive rates Under the billing structure that we had in place until now we would only receive warnings about extreme cases e g if someone went abroad and returned with an exorbitant bill a week later a situation that has arisen more than once due to the amount of time that some of our news correspondents can spend on the road Until now our employees would not necessarily have billing plans that were properly adapted to their work situation These scenarios will be spotted early on by the Telecom Expense Management system and monthly reports will be sent to each user so that they are aware of what they have consumed The TEM side of the TERMS project covers four important areas Inventory This deals with the creation of a complete inventory of mobile devices used within CBC Radio Canada which provides a detailed view of who owns what as well as how each device is used This was not available under the corporate infrastructure that we had until

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-3-2013/expense-reporting-management-systems/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Radio-Canada Est du Québec
    Editorial Paul Jané Thought Leadership The Perfect Storm of Change SYNC Issue 4 2013 Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Capability Through Connection Cloud Compliance Dejero at CBC Radio Canada Elections Technology File based Workflow Phase II The Second Screen in Power Politics Perceptive Pixel Board at CBC Radio Canada Scoop Contributors SYNC Issue 5 2013 Audio fil CDI Automated Production Control File based Workflow in HD Newsgathering Digital Digest The Private Cloud Turning Points HD Videoconferencing at CBC Radio Canada Editorial Fred Mattocks Editorial Paul Jané Contributors SYNC Issue 6 2014 Editorial Fred Mattocks Sync Editorial A Centralised Public Alerting Solution for CBC Radio Canada s Radio Networks Digital Digest ElectR File based Workflow Phase III Google Earth as a Broadcast Engineering Tool Self Serve IT The Mobile Workplace Media Asset Management Topping off our Digital World Contributors LinkedIn Facebook Twitter Print Email Radio Canada Est du Québec Article Contributors François Legrand Senior Project Manager Transformation Unit of CBC Radio Canada Helène Michaud Manager Media Support Special Projects Jonathan Jobin Systems Designer Media Engineering Over the course of the last few years a series of new technological implementations sponsored by CBC Radio Canada s Technology Strategy Board TSB has been carried out within the Corporation and they have given CBC Radio Canada the tools necessary to substantially improve the quality and timeliness of its local news coverage 1 and programming especially in regions distant from the Corporation s major production centres One of the technological implementations referenced above is CBC Radio Canada s Next Generation Converged Network NGCN 2 and the purpose of this article is to describe how the NGCN tapeless workflows 3 and a series of other revolutionary tools have allowed the Corporation to connect its regional television and radio stations together in Eastern Quebec and centralise its newsgathering and local production activities within the context of Radio Canada Est du Québec The Challenge Figure 1 CBC Radio Canada Stations News Bureaus in Eastern Quebec As with a variety of situations in Canada geography and distance create a distinct challenge especially when trying to provide improved local news coverage and programming in remote regions in an efficient and cost effective manner In this case the challenge was to provide Eastern Quebec with the production facilities necessary to handle the content being generated by a series of regional stations to provide those stations with a central repository for the content that they generate as well as the tools necessary to deliver access and post produce their content immediately and amongst other programming and content production possibilities allow local newscasts to be produced entirely within Eastern Quebec rather than in Quebec City which used to be the nearest centre with the appropriate facilities to handle such a task Radio Canada Est du Québec brings all of CBC Radio Canada s stations and news bureaus in Eastern Quebec together under a common infrastructure which is remarkable considering that the locations involved are the news bureaus in Baie Comeau 92 KM from Rimouski Carleton sur Mer 176 KM from Rimouski and Gaspé 300 KM from Rimouski as well as the stations in Matane 86 KM from Rimouski Rimouski 273 KM from Quebec City and Sept Îles 250 KM from Rimouski Under the Corporation s old infrastructure and workflows obtaining material from these stations for a local newscast produced in Quebec City every evening in a timely fashion was either impossible due to time and distance constraints or extremely costly as a content transfer would require the rental of a satellite feed and a series of telephone calls to coordinate with the station in Quebec City and ensure that someone would be available to receive and record the satellite feed In cases in which content did not require that degree of priority the most cost effective method of content delivery would involve putting a videocassette on a bus to Quebec City which would then leave content at the mercy of a variety of external factors such as the weather the time of day at which the news story broke and even others as mundane as traffic or the bus schedule itself As you might well imagine this creates serious issues when dealing with time sensitive news content To add to the confusion inherent in these arrangements at the time CBC Radio Canada leased unidirectional video links from Carleton sur Mer and Gaspé to Matane and from Baie Comeau to Sept Îles which gave these stations the ability to send content to Quebec City but not to receive any in return as such in these cases content sharing downstream from Quebec City had to be ensured through the physical transportation of cassettes between the sites The Solution One of the main impulses behind the creation of CBC Radio Canada s NGCN was the specific desire to allow the content generated by the Corporation s journalists and production teams to be immediately available and easily distributed throughout the Corporation even in its most distant outposts Consequently once the locations mentioned above were linked through the NGCN producing daily television newscasts from the Maison de Radio Canada de l Est du Québec became a realistic possibility Figure 2 Maison de Radio Canada Est du Québec in Rimouski A decision was taken to centralise all productions in Rimouski following the example set at the stations in Trois Rivières Sherbrooke and Saguenay Three camera crews are based in Rimouski but another nine are in the other cities belonging to the Est du Québec network in the interest of ensuring extensive coverage throughout the region The network s production file server may be located in Rimouski but the bulk of the content acquisition and production activities takes place outside of Rimouski remotely Infrastructure Workflow Insofar as the infrastructure is concerned most of the stations and news bureaus have a fairly limited set of tools and people on site an editing room albeit only in Matane and Sept Îles a small set for live on air appearances and a

    Original URL path: http://www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/en/reporting-to-canadians/sync/sync-issue-3-2013/radio-canada-est-du-quebec/ (2016-02-06)
    Open archived version from archive



  •