archive-ca.com » CA » R » RESTAURANTCENTRAL.CA

Total: 365

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Seven ways technology is influencing culinary and customer service trends
    Once the genie is out of the bottle it may be very hard to put it back so determining how to manage a growing list of permitted and innovative one off modifications will be a challenge How can technology help Mobile Create mobile websites with ingredients readily available by scanning a QR code on the menu The more a customer knows about what is in a menu item the less they need to ask This can also be done with a tablet at the table but that can be costly and they could disappear or breakdown Inventory management Use your systems to help determine ingredient lists and automatically track costs and inventory levels as they are used Updating ingredient lists can be automatic and formatted for easy viewing by your customer on the mobile website Adding an ingredient list becomes less onerous if it is automated and integrated with an Enterprise Resource Planning ERP system Data Anticipate substitutions based on data Use data from sales over time to look for the most common changes and put the recommended substitutions on the menu or add this to the mobile website to make it easy for patrons to see options Website Your desktop website should also display a willingness to adapt to the patrons preferences and possibly show some of the options available This is especially important if you wish to court customers who are health conscious or have dietary restrictions Point of sale interface Set the POS up to handle substitutions easily so staff training is minimized Options such as restrictions on certain substitutions price changes or server prompts should be coded right into the user interface to ensure a smooth workflow Surveys If you decide not to allow substitutions and it is impacting your business then consider using a survey

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/technologyculinarycustomerservicetrends.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Gluten-free ranks as most popular health claim on Canadian menus
    Menas July 15 2014 Tweet Leave a comment Top 10 healthy claims on restaurant menus According to Technomic s MenuMonitor database gluten free is the top health claim on Canadian menus appearing 560 times Restaurants are increasingly listing items as gluten free to appeal not only to individuals with dietary restrictions but also to diners who choose to order gluten free items as a healthier alternative Many of the gluten free item listings are either gluten free bread options for sandwiches or gluten free crust options for pizzas Some chains are even introducing entire menus highlighting gluten free items such as Casey s Grill Bar De Dutch and Hero Certified Burgers The second most popular health claim on Canadian menus is vegetarian Overall most diners consider vegetarian foods to be better for you dining options In many instances operators offer their signature menu items such as burgers Asian bowls and salads with an option to either exclude meat ingredients or replace them with an alternative protein such as tofu or a veggie burger patty There has also been a growing trend to present vegetables as the star of an entrée These vegetable centre of the plate offerings range from stuffed peppers to marinated eggplant Not only are these types of items ideal for strict vegetarian diners but they also appeal to flexitarian diners who occasionally want meat free options Appearing 333 times organic is another frequently used health claim on restaurant menus Most consumers are interested in purchasing foods that are free of chemical additives like pesticides hormones and preservatives By listing items as organic operators are satisfying a growing demand for fresh and natural foods Additionally the word organic is often associated with sustainability efforts using natural chemical free ingredients is viewed as healthier for the environment as well

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/Glutenfreehealthclaim.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Creating opportunity: The employment potential of the aboriginal community
    opportunities for new businesses in aboriginal communities The restaurant sector collectively can accelerate Aboriginal Peoples success in the workforce by helping them acquire skills that will help them throughout their lives regardless of the career path they settle on Provides education Formed in 1998 the Aboriginal Human Resource Council AHRC is a national not for profit organization that advocates the full participation of aboriginal people in Canada s labour market on a national level Through its advisory services AHRC designs programs that help Canadian employers bring aboriginal people into the Canadian workforce The council s charity Kocihta helps members of the aboriginal community including First Nations Inuit and Métis to overcome challenges to reach their dreams and career potential Lendsay says that while there is still a long way to go for full inclusion of aboriginal people business awareness and public perception about aboriginal workers have been moving in the right direction for several years Ten years ago you could walk into a McDonald s or a Tim Horton s and you would see aboriginal people buying stuff but you wouldn t see them working there You wouldn t see aboriginal managers says Lendsay Today in a place like Prince Albert Saskatchewan where one third of the population is aboriginal at every Tim Horton s I see aboriginal people working I see managers This is the real economic change I see across Canada Companies like McDonald s and Tim Horton s are starting to realize that they can do more than just supply employment to management opportunities They re actually helping to change public attitudes Assesses needs Through their programs the AHRC works with employers in three main areas advisory services diagnostics and training and recruitment It is a systems process that not only helps businesses fill their employment needs but also helps create a positive inclusive atmosphere by educating their entire workforce Companies improve performance when they adopt a learning and training attitude says Lendsay We provide a strong set of learning tools and knowledge for employers and also go in house to do advisory work and training It is really important for us to listen to companies to see where they are at Many companies are at the very beginning stages of the Inclusion Continuum roadmap where they need some knowledge and guidance on how to build relationships with Indigenous people and communities and become inclusive employers of choice for Indigenous talent AHRC corporate partners such as McDonald s Tim Horton s and Aramark Remote Workplace Services are turning to AHRC in growing numbers to design and implement strategies and practices to improve their businesses as well as strengthen their relationship with the aboriginal community Provides insights The AHRC program has provided us with great insights on inclusion and diversity that we along with our employees can benefit from says Len Jillard chief people officer at McDonald s Canada For example the council led a Mastering Aboriginal Inclusion Workshop we held in Edmonton this year to educate our

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/employmentpotentialaboriginalcommunity.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive



  • How to manage young staff in the kitchen
    cultivate the best potential from these growing learning young minds It is now our challenge to structure discipline and focus into their culinary foundation without encroaching on borders of respect and wisdom Generation Y is confident ambitious and achievement oriented They have high expectations of their employers seek out new challenges and are not afraid to question authority Generation Y wants meaningful work and a solid learning curve Unfortunately it has also been my experience that Gen Y gets so caught up in achieving that they are quick to take unwise shortcuts and push to fast track a career that has barely taken off This is where leadership skills are vital Here at the Calgary Petroleum Club we have three rules to follow 1 Create a learning environment A successful leader creates and fosters an ideal learning environment In establishing such an atmosphere you will take on new challenges within your kitchen By generating excitement motivation and new skill sets your staff will learn more than if you are constantly screaming at them Learning from a dedicated teacher and having the opportunity to utilize new skill sets instills loyalty and longevity within your team 2 Communication creating an atmosphere that provides positive feedback and opportunity to voice opinions respectfully reinforces a behaviour that will become an active part of a solution instead of perpetuating the disrespectful problem mentality Keeping open lines of communication within your team is important making yourself approachable is also key When your staff is too afraid to ask questions in fear of yelling ridicule or scolding it will only limit their growth and the success of your business 3 Empowerment remembering that Gen Y is goal oriented Empowering your team to make responsible decisions on its own creates a respectful cooperative working environment Everyone wants to

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/manageyoungkitchenstaff.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Three processes for staffing success
    to report their performance on critical business areas leaving no doubts on performance The ownership or leadership team can then provide recognition where possible correct where needed and continue to have their finger on the pulse of the business When Gen Y are properly led managed and clear expectations are set amazing things will happen Measuring staff turnover often The Generation Y work force is the most transient group of staff ever in our industry They move from job to job more often than generations before them Constantly training new people is not only time consuming it s a major expense to your operation The cost of replacing a manager in many organizations is two to three times their annual salary The cost of replacing front line staff can be felt too think about any terrible online reviews of your business Your leadership team should be calculating employee attrition every month to determine the cost to the business and figure out ways to reduce it A great way to find solutions to an attrition problem is to conduct exit interviews with all staff members These should not be a witch hunt or an exercise in blame but rather a top level conversation on why the employee decided to leave and what two or three changes they think would make the business stronger These interviews can be eye opening Tracking reasons over time will definitely show patterns and opportunities for improvement that can deliver previously untapped profits and a stronger company culture Recognition It s free and powerful Our new 19 to 29 year old workforce has grown up being recognized for everything they do Participation trophies and ribbons have become the norm Today s workforce performs better with a higher dose of recognition So do that The great news is

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/processesforstaffingsuccess.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Four questions to help you hire the right restaurant staff
    for your restaurant you need to be able to attract the right people Today s generation has grown up in a digital age and communicating within digital channels is of paramount importance Online job boards and social media are a great place to start Online job boards provide both free and paid platforms to broadcast your job openings to a large audience Social media can then be used to amplify these postings and engage with potential staff Creating a connection with job seekers starts by knowing where these individuals reside online and starting to engage Start by looking at your current staff and what social channels they use to interact Screening for the best fit hires Do you hire using gut instincts or do you have a way of assessing one employee over another While most restaurant owners and managers are great judges of character an assessment tool can give tangible metrics to measure a potential hire versus another Implementing an assessment into your hiring process allows you to better predict who will be a successful employee Assessments can measure areas such as attributes and skills culture fit and engagement levels before hiring is completed Even the most basic assessment tool can provide a level of measurement that can be used for assessing future hires and comparing against your top staff Engaging your staff Do you measure engagement levels of your current staff This generation of workers is known for being a transient group who on average will switch jobs every two years One way to measure your staffs engagement levels is by using ongoing pulse surveys These are quick confidential surveys that give a real time understanding of what is going on within your restaurant and share insights into employee morale Additionally engagement platforms are another tool companies are

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/hiretherightrestaurantstaff.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Recipe for success: Ingredients for an engaged foodservice workforce
    equal better performance and better pay will not convince people to stay in a poor work environment Canadian employees consider health and dental plans as well as short and long term disability benefits the most important benefits employers can offer In 2012 nearly half of food and beverage businesses offered their employees flex time while a lower percentage offered health dental coverage long term disability and short term eg sick leave coverage On the other hand most businesses offer some form of employee discount or free services to their employees While these types of perks are highly valued by young employees they are less important to older workers Workers particularly young employees also place a high value on the opportunity for advancement In fact when considering an offer of employment Canadians aged 18 to 24 who were looking for work considered potential advancement to be more important than a competitive wage or salary As young workers shrink as a proportion of the labour market offering such career advancement perks may become less beneficial Going forward it is important to maintain an awareness of the items that workers value in order to offer the best possible compensation package The importance of employee benefits Benefit Perk Percent of Businesses Offering Importance to Employees 1 Employee discounts free services 81 5 80 Communications technology cell phone PDA 50 4 86 Company car mileage allowance 49 5 16 Flex time 45 7 15 Group health dental insurance 2 44 8 23 Employee dependent life insurance 37 7 41 Tickets to events 35 4 12 Long term disability 28 7 79 Association memberships 26 4 42 Short term disability sick benefits 21 7 83 Maternity parental leave 2 20 5 07 Telecommuting home based 16 4 79 Registered pension plan 14 7 40 Group RRSP 12 5 94 On site amenities 4 4 63 Opportunity for advancement Not asked 8 26 Source CTHRC 1 Rated on a scale of 1 to 10 where 10 indicated the perk or benefits was highly important 2 Benefits additional to legislated requirements Non wage considerations important Foodservice businesses are not only competing with one another when it comes to attracting and retaining staff they are competing with other industries Depending on the competing sector or industry the ability of foodservice operators to compete head to head on wage may be a substantial challenge Therefore highlighting the non wage benefits of working in the sector is key to a successful attraction and retention strategy If workers only cared about the wages they earned one could assume that giving raises to employees would result in higher retention rates But a recent global survey from the iOpener Institute for People and Performance found there was no correlation between pay increases and retention rates Employee engagement was identified as more important in retaining staff This was particularly true for the younger Gen Y generation Projected labour shortages in food and beverage services by province 2030 Happy workers stay the course The iOpener findings

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/engagedfoodserviceworkforce.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Staff and customer rewards are priceless at restaurants and foodservice operations
    filled with price discounts limited time offer deals loyalty programs and reward points the need to trump a competitor in an attempt to build traffic and customer loyalty seem like an infinite immediate need While these programs often have outstanding results and do have merit there are other meaningful ways to resonate with both our customers and our valued employees who serve them Did I mention they are free and don t cost a cent Yes in some recent heart to heart surveys with dedicated foodservice industry personnel and clientele I was reminded that recognition is an incredibly powerful reward Staff want to be recognized for their extra efforts by their Manager Being noticed by your peers for an exceptional job raises self worth exponentially The reward can be the ability to select your own shifts choose your section get preferred parking or be able to bring in friends for a dinner on the house The same is so true for customers We do like to stand out in the crowd and be called by name remembered for our patronage or receive any form of VIP treatment Again with no cost to an owner operator special seating an enhanced celebration

    Original URL path: http://www.restaurantcentral.ca/staffcustomerrewards.aspx (2016-02-14)
    Open archived version from archive



  •